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Question concerning the use of a European Gas Range Cooker in the USA


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Hello !

Ich have a small question: First of all, i am aware that this is a customer service question which a already reached out for, however this customer service is slooooowww.

 

The following scenario happened: I will move work related to the united states and would love to take my Falcon Excel 110 gas range cooker with me.

Is anyone experienced with whether i am able to use it at all or need to transform anything to use this cooker in the states? Mayor concerns would be electricity (110v vs. 240v ) and gas type.

 

I have read that some appliances use 240volt in the united states but i wanted to make sure that is correct or if there is any solution to use the device as it would be a shame to get rid of it.

 

thanks a lot in advance!

 

 

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Ah this is good news. any idea how complicated it would be or is this a standard in the us for big appliances as i read?

 

Gas ist says dual fuel. i use regular gas from my outlet, unfortunately i do not know by head what this is. the range cooker can also use propane if that helps.

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If you’re buying a house, presumably you can do whatever you like, though not all homes have natural gas already connected and you may need to run a line from the street to the house.  If you’ll be renting, most US  rentals include major appliances. 

 

Where are you moving to?  Gas availability will also vary by region. Here in the Northwest we have relatively inexpensive hydropower electricity and gas is not as common, especially in rental apartments. 

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i agree, however, this is being paid by the company and probably still cheaper then storing. considering the prices these beasts cost in the us and what i have paid for it ( i got it from a company that went out of business, dirt cheap, as this is usually not the kind of lifestyle i could or would live ) it would be sad to let it go. so it seems impractical but maybe is even more practical then selling.

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If you will be in the Portland metro area natural gas is quite available, but not always in rental properties.

I'd say that more often it is electric.  Again, if you're going to be in Portland, know that rentals are quite pricey right now and can be hard to find.

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I am not familiar with your oven, but went here http://www.rangemaster.co.uk/media/332729/u109010.pdf and found a manual that says it is a dual fuel. 

 

If you have a dual fuel, that may present an issue, and you will likely need to have either electric or gas work done.  In general, most outlets in US homes are 120 volt.  240 volt lines are run directly to certain appliances, like a dryer which will have a 240 volt outlet, and an hvac handler, which will be hard wired.  It is not uncommon to see a 240 volt outlet in a kitchen, but that is for an electric oven, but usually, the space where the oven is located has either a 240 volt outlet for an electric range - oven, or a gas pipe, and a 120 volt outlet for a gas oven.  ( Gas ovens use 120 volts to run the electronics ).  If you have dual fuel, you will need both gas and 240, and again that is extremely unusual.  As to gas, they don't use voltage numbers, but instead use pressure ratings.   The manual says it uses 29 millibars of gas.  According to this page, natural gas at the meter varies  from .27 to .29  psi    https://inspectapedia.com/plumbing/Gas_Pressures.php      According to a gas calculator I just ran online, that is 19 millibars.   I am no expert in this field, but you do want to have the pressure correct, so you will definitely want to do more investigation.

As to the electric, the manual I referenced above says the  electrical requirement is 230 v / 400 v at 50hz?   Standard in the US is 240 volt  60 hz..  You should have a plate somewhere on the range   that tells you the acceptable electrical requirements.  

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13 hours ago, lindag said:

If you will be in the Portland metro area natural gas is quite available, but not always in rental properties.

I'd say that more often it is electric.  Again, if you're going to be in Portland, know that rentals are quite pricey right now and can be hard to find.

 

So OP not only needs to find a rental with gas in the kitchen, s/he also needs to convince the landlord to remove and store the existing range and possibly request electrical work be done?  I can't imagine landlords being too excited about that.

 

 

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if you end up w a rental , its very unlikely that your range will be accepted by the owner.

 

if a firm is paying you , then ask them to pay for storage.

 

if you move permanently to the USA

 

store the range until you buy your own place.  and have your employer at least cover the cost of getting the range to USA storage.

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