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Long cooked eggs


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Has anyone ever made "uova inhaminade" or long-cooked eggs?
I'm looking for suggestions for a good temperature at which to cook them and any experience regarding length of time.

I'm equally curious if anyone has tried to do this sous vide?

 

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Has anyone experience with cooking eggs sous vide for extended periods of time?
It's been my experience that cooking meats for too long, even at precise temperatures, can cause textural changes--sometimes rubbery sometimes mushy.

I'm wondering if this could be used with cooking eggs to some advantage.

 

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It's quite common in the Jewish Sabbath dish called cholent, although it's most often used in the Sefardi version, which is called Hamin and seems to exist within the name you've mentioned. Essentially, eggs (still in the shell) are added to a pot of meat and potatoes that is placed in a low oven on Friday night. It cooks all night and is eaten for the Saturday mid-day meal. The eggs take on a very particular flavor, texture and color. I've never heard anyone mention a set amount of time or a set temperature for the cooking. 

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1 hour ago, faronem said:

Has anyone experience with cooking eggs sous vide for extended periods of time?
It's been my experience that cooking meats for too long, even at precise temperatures, can cause textural changes--sometimes rubbery sometimes mushy.

I'm wondering if this could be used with cooking eggs to some advantage.

 

 I rather doubt it but given that eggs are not an expensive ingredient you might want to give it a try.

Edited by Anna N
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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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12 minutes ago, scubadoo97 said:

What are you shooting for, rubbery or mushy? :P

I suspect but don't know for sure that the OP is looking for the texture you get with oven baked eggs.   

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

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It's worth a shot. Long-cooked hamine eggs are an Egyptian staple, and I'm told develop a uniquely soft texture over time. 

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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i have made hamine eggs in the pressure cooker. They have a unique consistency, kinda like a custard, and a hammy flavor! I don;t think that has anything to do with their name. Everyone should try a hamine egg at least once. They are intriguing. 

Never made it sous vide, although i suppose you could at 180F for a long time, but whats the point. 

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I had to Google hamine eggs. Here's one iteration of the method. 

 

@Heartsurgeon

can you give us your method in the pressure cooker,  please?

 

 

Here's a link to the Sephardic eggs I meant when I said "oven-baked". 

Edited by Anna N
Added a link then fixed a typo (log)

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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I have made hamine eggs in the pressure cooker, probably the most efficient way to do this. they have a custard iike texture, and in my opinion, a hammy flavor (nothing to do with the name).

60 minutes in the pressure cooker at 15psi. let the cooker cool/decompress by itself off heat. 

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Somehow (I'm guessing caffeine deficiency) I'd missed that the OP spoke specifically about hamine eggs, and only got the part about wondering if they'd work sous vide. My bad. 

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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Hammin eggs are very popular in Israel, most often served as part of hammin or tchoulent,  with jacnun, and sometimes with hummus, more often with hummus-ful. They are very liked and appreciated due to the long cooking time. Some will boil eggs with a tea bag in order to color them without a long cooking time, but this does not effect the taste or the inner color. 

 

 

Personally, I'm not a fan, but I don't really like regular hard boiled eggs either. 

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I googled this, and found quite a few articles.

 

A simple 7 hours pressure slow-cooker eggs:

http://www.fourpoundsflour.com/the-history-dish-seven-hour-eggs/

- Put eggs into pressure slow-cooker

- Cover with water

- Set pressure cooker to low

- Cook for 7 hours

 

Similar to above, but only 1 hour in pressure cooker:

https://www.reddit.com/r/Cooking/comments/2w0rr0/pressurecooked_hamine_eggs/

 

5 hours oven roasted eggs:

http://fxcuisine.com/default.asp?language=2&Display=64&resolution=high

- Soak eggs into warm water for few minutes

- Place the eggs in 105C/220F oven

- Cook for 5 hours

 

Sous vide experiment, it doesn't work:

http://mengwong.livejournal.com/81737.html

 

They are very interesting!

 

I like the roasted one :)

Edited by Josh71 (log)
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 I think you mean seven hour slow cooker eggs.  

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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1 hour ago, Anna N said:

 I think you mean seven hour slow cooker eggs.  

 

You right, my mistake, and updated.

 

Too bad, I don't have slow-cooker.

 

And still thinking why the sous-vide experiment didn't work. Shouldn't it be the same as slow-cooker? ... hmmm

Well, it was not mentioned how-long the sous vide was done though.

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@Josh71, what was wrong with the sous vide eggs? If you were to repeat the experiment, what would you do differently?

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Josh I just read the fourpoundsflour article with interest and was intrigued with the results and the history.   I'm not sure what the water temperature is at low in a slow cooker,  but since the eggs are cooked in water I don't see why using a SV bath wouldn't work

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6 hours ago, cakewalk said:

Haven't checked this blog in a while, but here's what she's been doing:

http://www.aglaiakremezi.com/pickled-huevos-haminados-slow-cooked-eggs-with-plenty-of-onion-skins/

 

 

Fascinating.  And an interesting blog too!   Thank you for sharing.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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I have done this last weekend:

 

5 hours oven roasted eggs:

http://fxcuisine.com/default.asp?language=2&Display=64&resolution=high

 

The result was exactly as described in the article, brown egg, smooth yolk, distinct aroma.

 

But that's it :)

 

I served with infusing olive oil with bacon and garlic, by warming it. A little bit accidity from lemon juice.

 

Taste nice, but my wife said "It's just an egg and you wasted 5 hours electricity for this???" LOL.

Edited by Josh71 (log)
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  • 3 years later...
On 4/9/2017 at 11:56 AM, shain said:

Personally, I'm not a fan, but I don't really like regular hard boiled eggs either. 

 

How taste can change, I came to mostly enjoy hard boiled eggs and I love hamminados.

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