Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.


nextguy
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi all I was wondering if any of you think it would be feasible to make black garlic in a temp controlled water bath? I understand from reading an article on ehow that you need to pack the garlic loosely in a jar and heat them for 40 days at 140 degrees and that the garlic should remain humid. I was thinking of putting them in a sealed bag (not vacuumed) and then floating it on a 140 degree water bath for 40 days.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi all I was wondering if any of you think it would be feasible to make black garlic in a temp controlled water bath? I understand from reading an article on ehow that you need to pack the garlic loosely in a jar and heat them for 40 days at 140 degrees and that the garlic should remain humid. I was thinking of putting them in a sealed bag (not vacuumed) and then floating it on a 140 degree water bath for 40 days.

I'd say it's worth a try. But how about putting them in a mason jar instead of a bag so they can be held more easily under water?

I'm thinking I need an old microbiology incubator for these experiments! Here's one that should work

Edited by Kerry Beal (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

How many waterbaths do you have??? I'd hate to tie mine up for 40 days at 140F!!!

Ya I only have one and would hate to lose it for 40 days but I can't think of any other way. I am also a bit concerned about food safety. I know very little about microbiology but I would think that after 40 days I would achieve pasteurization but not sterilization. I am also concerned about the humidity. In the traditional process the garlic is heated in a container in an oven which would still allow more airflow than a sealed bag in a water bath. I don't know how this process would work with the garlic basically steaming in its own vapors.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd say it's worth a try. But how about putting them in a mason jar instead of a bag so they can be held more easily under water?

I'm thinking I need an old microbiology incubator for these experiments! Here's one that should work

I thought about using a jar but I think the garlic needs to be in a single layer. A mason jar would not be as wide as a good sized bag.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd say it's worth a try. But how about putting them in a mason jar instead of a bag so they can be held more easily under water?

I'm thinking I need an old microbiology incubator for these experiments! Here's one that should work

I thought about using a jar but I think the garlic needs to be in a single layer. A mason jar would not be as wide as a good sized bag.

True - so you might want to sink it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Hello all. I should have been posting updates on this little project but, well, life sometimes gets in the way. In any case, today I have finally hit the 40 day mark and my garlic is nice and black. It has been tough not having my water bath for such a length of time. For the first few weeks the smell was quite strong but now is pretty mild. I haven't opened the bag yet because of one concern. Does anyone have ideas on how I should store the garlic? I have 6 whole heads and thought about just storing them in a jar unpeeled but I am still concerned about food safety. And even though I cooked these things at 140F for 40 days I am still worried eating them at all. Does anyone have any thoughts?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello all. I should have been posting updates on this little project but, well, life sometimes gets in the way. In any case, today I have finally hit the 40 day mark and my garlic is nice and black. It has been tough not having my water bath for such a length of time. For the first few weeks the smell was quite strong but now is pretty mild. I haven't opened the bag yet because of one concern. Does anyone have ideas on how I should store the garlic? I have 6 whole heads and thought about just storing them in a jar unpeeled but I am still concerned about food safety. And even though I cooked these things at 140F for 40 days I am still worried eating them at all. Does anyone have any thoughts?

The ones I buy seem to be packaged with a silica drying pouch. I'd probably put them in a jar with one or two of those.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

The process of making Korean Black Garlic is long. Traditionally it is fermented for 40 days at 140degrees. I wouldn't want to tie up my sous vide cooker that long and also worried about developing botulism. Would using a pressure cooker to over carmelize the garlic work? Any other ideas on a modernist take on making black garlic?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A pressure cooker would only burn and not ferment the garlic. It would "look" black, but it wouldn't "taste" black.

I've read that you can do black garlic in the oven, too. So you could just SousVide it, and when you need to use the machine just move the garlic to the oven to keep the fermentation process going.

Ciao,

L

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 5 months later...

Hi,

I'd like to give black garlic a go, does anyone have a tried and tested process? Based on what I read on internet, I am inclining towards using my rice cooker in warm setting, just need to double check the temperature it runs at. I have seen temperatures mentioned from 60 to 66C, I guess lower temp will mean longer "cooking" time. How about the drying step afterwards, is 20 days really necessary or can it be done in 2-3 days to get it fully dry and safe for spoilage?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's a link that was post a year or so ago. Black Garlic process.

I tried it in my Excalibur dehydrator - the results were just so-so so I am buying mine because I do not need a large supply.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've looked at this a year or so ago since I can't find the stuff anywhere (yeah, could order, but there's no "hunt" in that) but I gave up quickly on the idea of doing this at home. From what I read the long time is a key ingredient and I'm not inclined to run a machine for 40 days to see if it works. This is one of the things (like fish sauce) that I leave to the pros with the right machines.

But if you do manage to make this at home, please let us know, I'm sure there'd be some interest!

"And don't forget music - music in the kitchen is an essential ingredient!"

- Thomas Keller

Diablo Kitchen, my food blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Did using your dehydrator ... dehydrate it too much? I would imagine 40 days - even wrapped in foil - would be enough to dry them out.

Not just in foil, I first put it in a glass container with a vacuum-sealed lid and wrapped that in foil. There were no problems with the dehydrator and it runs off a solar panel so no electric cost.

It was as moist and soft as the commercial stuff but did not have the flavor. I bought the best garlic (a hard-neck variety) from an organic grower but the flavor just was not as complex as I like.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you for the replies. I tested my rice cooker overnight, it can maintain 57C. My plan was to fill in with few cm of warm water, then put in a wrapped jar with garlic in and let it run. In a different articles I found, the process was described as first steam the garlic for one day ( but no temperature specified), then let it sit warm and humid for 30 days. Other sources claim 10-14 days in rice cooker is sufficient. I guess it depends on what you are after.

While this can be fun to do, I am not sure it will be worthwhile, if I can only achieve average home results compared to the commercial garlic, and risk killing my rice cooker or even starting fire. Hmmm...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
  • 1 month later...
  • 3 years later...

I'm currently a few days short of finishing my first black garlic experiment. This is in aid of coming up with a novel product for the Toronto Garlic Festival this fall.

 

I'm working with this sous vide method suggested on the ChefSteps Community forum.

 

I started with peeled garlic cloves, sealed and cooked at 75C for 48 hours. Then removed from the bag and placed in dehydrator at 60C for another 48 hours. It was supposed to be 24 hours - but...

 

Sealed again and back in sous vide at 75C where it has been bathing for a week so far.

 

After the first bath and drying it was a dark caramelized brown - now back in the bath it's getting quite inky black.

 

Doesn't smell quite as distinctive now - but still glad it's in the garage.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By Anonymous Modernist 16589
      I'm looking to buy some new pots and pans and would like to tap into your knowledege and experiance with them. Which pans tend to yield the best and most consistant results. Same for pots. Any and all recommendations would be greatly appriciated, thank you in advance.
      Herman 8D
    • By Doodad
      Has anybody tried making a dark roux in a pressure cooker? Can this be done without scortching do you think? I have made roux in the oven before and started wondering about this topic.
    • By kostbill
      I really want to improve the flavor of my chicken breast so I want to try to inject brine with fat and flavors.
       
      I would like to try brining with some hydrocolloids. The one example I found is this: https://torontofoodlab.com/2013/08/20/meat-tenderizing-with-a-carrageenan-brine/.
       
      However I cannot apply that to my chicken breast because I am cooking it sous vide, so the chicken will not reach the temperature needed for the carrageenan to gel.
       
      I am thinking of using Methyl cellulose, first disperse in hot water, then leave it for 24 hours in the fridge, then add salt, fat and flavors and inject it.
      I am afraid that until it reaches the 50C or 60C that the Methyl cellulose needs in order to gel, the liquid will escape.
      Any ideas?
      Thanks.
    • By Anonymous Modernist 760
      Thanks for putting up this forum 🙂
      I would like to bake using a combination of sous vide and a conventional oven. Would it be possible to put the dough in a vacuum bag cook it sous vide at 37C for the dough to raise optimal and then put it in a conventional oven?
      Thanks
    • By Chef Hermes Blog
      Warm Onion Bavarois
      * 300g Sweet Onion purée
      * 250g Whole milk
      * 150g Whipping cream
      * 150g Chicken stock (or fresh vegetable nage, not stock cubes)
      * 3.5g Gellan gum
      * Seasoning
      Lightly grease with vegetable oil the moulds you intend to use (darioles, ramekins etc) and set to one side.
      In a pan (but not on the heat), whisk together all the ingredients.
      Place on a medium heat and whisk continuously, the mix will start to thicken slightly. Carry on whisking for a further 3-4 minutes when it has started to bubble. Then quickly pour into the greased moulds & chill.
      To reheat for serving, just place the ramekin in a pan of water and simmer gently for 8-10 mins.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...