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Pacojet recipes

4 posts in this topic

Hi Guys!

 

I'm looking for some real pacojet recipes and I was wondering if anybody care about sharing their recipes here. 

 

The ones I use in my work place are pretty limited and do not work 100% if you change some ingredients.

 

I'm specially looking for sorbet recipes.

 

If someone have any good tips about pacojet, I would love to hear it.

 

Cheers  :smile:

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Looking forward to the answers.


Edited by gfweb (log)

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as am I.  the PC in on my Lottery LIst.   Its used regularly on Great British Menu with a blast freezer.

 

not so much at my house.  I take it this is an At Work Item?

 

what's made at work that's popular, if you are able to share ....

 

:biggrin:

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You get some recipes on the official website:

http://www.pacojet.com/en/recipes/

 

Pacojet is more versatile than a standard churning machine, you can get good results even if your recipe is quite out of the standard balance (much less sugars, less fats and so on). Usually all recipes that work with a churning machine work perfectly with a Pacojet too.

About sorbets you can drastically reduce the sugars ratio, just give a look at the official recipes.

 

 

 

Teo


My pastry blog (in Italian language): http://www.teonzo.com/

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