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Kerry Beal

Report: eG Chocolate and Confectionery Workshop 2013

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Today we started out with a trip to the college to start getting ourselves set up for tomorrow. Then at 10 am we met at ChocolateFX and started our tour. Of course hair nets are obligatory if you are going to go into a food manufacturing facility!

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Wilma and Art had the small pan set up so that we could pan some raisins.

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Here's Pat (psantucc), with beard appropriately netted, applying some chocolate to the raisins.

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Ava (FrogPrincesse's little one) preparing to add more chocolate, Kyle helping and FrogPrincesse awaiting her turn.

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The fancy packing machine.

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Listening with rapt attention to Wilma explaining the making of ganache truffles in the round silicone molds.


Edited by Kerry Beal (log)

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Lunch today at the Old Firehall Restaurant in St David.

Here are a few pictures snapped around the table -

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Dinner tonight at The Old Winery -

Got a few pictures of things close to me -

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Believe it or not - I did not order the Calamari!

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Arctic Char for Anna.

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Lots of pizzas ordered.

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A nice grilled pork chop for me.

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And finally for today - Show and Tell.

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Here's what happens when you drive all the way from Virginia on a nice sunny day.

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Some more photos from Art & Wilma's wonderful shop, Chocolate FX, in Niagara-on-the-Lake.<br />ImageUploadedByTapatalk1367060494.691611.jpg<br />ImageUploadedByTapatalk1367060542.347558.jpgImageUploadedByTapatalk1367060599.040837.jpg

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As always, thank you Kerry, for all the photos you take. And the commentary. Would that I could go.

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Production is under way for our dinner tonight.

FrogPrincesse is getting the cocktails ready -

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Dave and his students are preparing the various meats and veg for us. Student just pulled out the best looking cheese platter I've seen in a long time.

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Ruth's centerpiece has been adorned with wine thanks to little Ava.

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The room temperature wine is waiting - cold wine still in the fridge.

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Can I mention how wonderful it smells in here?

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Dinner Panorama at Niagara College. Great spread - Thanks to chef David Gibson and his Crew.

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I'm am so unbelievably envious. Looks like a fabulous time - again - thanks for all the pictures. Maybe next year.....

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wow, everything so far looks incredible! Thank you for sharing! That fruit plate and the cheese- does it for me!

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Photos of some of the chocolates we made at the workshop. Everyone took home a fabulous selection and we still had plenty to share with Niagara College. <br />ImageUploadedByTapatalk1367184772.642517.jpgImageUploadedByTapatalk1367184791.477114.jpgImageUploadedByTapatalk1367184808.639074.jpgImageUploadedByTapatalk1367184825.727300.jpgImageUploadedByTapatalk1367184845.163135.jpg

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Thanks Kerry for all of your work this weekend - we had a great time!!

Alas, upon returning home, Matthew Kayahara and I discovered that four of our caramel rulers appear to have not made it back to Guelph with us - two 16" 1/2 inch ones, and one each of a 12" 1/2 inch and a 12" 1/4 inch. I'm pretty sure we loaned them out to someone today (although with my head bent over a ganache, I'm not totally certain who), so if they turn up in your luggage, please let me or Matt K know!

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Thanks Kerry for all of your work this weekend - we had a great time!!

Alas, upon returning home, Matthew Kayahara and I discovered that four of our caramel rulers appear to have not made it back to Guelph with us - two 16" 1/2 inch ones, and one each of a 12" 1/2 inch and a 12" 1/4 inch. I'm pretty sure we loaned them out to someone today (although with my head bent over a ganache, I'm not totally certain who), so if they turn up in your luggage, please let me or Matt K know!

Aluminum? I probably grabbed them - next time you are through have a look at my collection and grab the ones that are yours.

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Thanks Kerry for all of your work this weekend - we had a great time!!

Alas, upon returning home, Matthew Kayahara and I discovered that four of our caramel rulers appear to have not made it back to Guelph with us - two 16" 1/2 inch ones, and one each of a 12" 1/2 inch and a 12" 1/4 inch. I'm pretty sure we loaned them out to someone today (although with my head bent over a ganache, I'm not totally certain who), so if they turn up in your luggage, please let me or Matt K know!

Aluminum? I probably grabbed them - next time you are through have a look at my collection and grab the ones that are yours.

Yup, aluminum. I wouldn't be surprised if they had ended up with your array. Thanks again!

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I've got lots of finished product shots and can post them later. Meanwhile here are a couple of panorama overview shots of them. And the kitchen at the end.

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The calm before the storm. Anna setting up the coffee service, Chocolot and RobertM having a little chinwag.

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Breakfast - muffins and scones made for us by Chef Storm.

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Croissants made by Chef Ellis - who was supposed to join us but unfortunately found himself having to work at a friends bakery for the day.

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Liron and Tikidoc perusing the transfers given to us by www.chocotransfersheets.com'>Chocotransfer Sheets. They also kindly donated a chablon kit that merlicky was lucky enough to win in our draw.

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Lunch was lovely buns baked by Keith Ellis (there was also bread but we didn't figure this out until day 2), salads and cheese and cold cuts. The cold cuts come from Denninger's which is a store selling eastern european food products - their german salami and sliced roast beef are two of my favourite sandwich fillings.

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After lunch I made some coloured cocoa butters. I had planned to demo this anyway but it became more necessary by the little incident that happened. I had placed all (and I mean all) of the coloured cocoa butters that we have collected from kindly donations from Chef Rubber over the past several workshops on a heating pan with an dimmer switch attached - a hotel pan placed over the top to keep the heat in. When we arrived Saturday morning we were alerted to a problem by the appearance of a puddle of dusty rose cocoa butter on the ground. The bottom of about half the bottles had melted and the rest were hanging on by a straw.

One little problem - the cocoa butter that I had melted overnight on another little warmer was about 95º C in the morning and even when it had cooled down to room temperature it remained liquid. The colours sprayed though an airbrush it were fine, but painted not quite so good.

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Ava and her treats.

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Alleguede showing Cacaoflower how to back off a mold.

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I don't have as many pictures as I'd like to - spent a bit of time running around - so I'm counting on others to post as many pictures as possible.

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We had a bit of a tempering problem on Saturday - still makes a rather interesting appearance IMHO!

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You can see Matthew Hayday's cherry cordials - a collaborative effort between Matt and Chocolot.

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Group shot!

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wonderful looking at everything and imagining being there!

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Fantastic workshop. Kerry is Wonder Woman!! She doesn't have the word NO in her vocabulary. I will attempt to post some photos.

The Three Amigos in Kerry chocolate room. (photo is posted to make everyone envious:)

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Kerry treated us to lunch while shopping at Costco-poutine

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Art and Wilma at Chocolate FX were extremely generous in allowing us to play at their factory. We all had a chance to pan and enrobe.

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Lunch at the Firehall.

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Dinner at the Old Winery-does it seem like all we did is eat??

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