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Ader1

"Florence Lin's Complete Book of Chinese Noodles, Dumplings an

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I'm considering buying Florence Lin's Complete Book of Chinese Noodles, Dumplings and Breads. It's out of print but it's possible to get hold of it but it's expensive. I've seen some brief reviews on this site and basically, most of them rate it quite well if not highly. I would like to hear what people who've got this book think of it? Have they tried making noodles from the recipes provided? Have they made any of the noodle soups/dishes and how did they turn out? And also, how to you rate the dumplings and bread recipes? It's a shame that they don't do a re-print. Thanks in advance.

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Doesn't look like many have this book although I have seen it mentioned briefly on other threads.......

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I put in a request through public library interlibrary loan, sounds interesting enough to take a look.

I take it you already have Andrea Nguyen's book on Asian dumplings? Though Lin's book looks more technical, arranges by wheat, rice, bean flours.


Per la strada incontro un passero che disse "Fratello cane, perche sei cosi triste?"

Ripose il cane: "Ho fame e non ho nulla da mangiare."

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I've had this book for ages, but haven't made anything besides the shao bing (which is excellent).

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When you mentioned it it sounded familiar. So I went searching and found my paperback copy. Lots of post-it notes, and written notes in it. It must have been an early "Asian" cook book for me. Time to get it out and get cooking. Do have, and love Asian Dumplings so will see how this compares now.

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Not to derail the thread, but it just makes me think of how annoying it is when a great cookbook becomes way too expensive because it's out of print... Case in point for me is Please to the Table... starts at $50, and tops out around $200! The situation is even worse on ebay for that one.

I managed to pick up a used library copy for $2 a few years ago, perhaps my greatest cookbook find.

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Not to derail the thread, but it just makes me think of how annoying it is when a great cookbook becomes way too expensive because it's out of print... Case in point for me is Please to the Table... starts at $50, and tops out around $200! The situation is even worse on ebay for that one.

I managed to pick up a used library copy for $2 a few years ago, perhaps my greatest cookbook find.

Luckily, I bought that one while it was still in print. More in line with this thread, I really want a new copy of Irene Kuo's Key to Chinese Cooking, but I'm not paying $100+ for it.

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Not to derail the thread, but it just makes me think of how annoying it is when a great cookbook becomes way too expensive because it's out of print... Case in point for me is Please to the Table... starts at $50, and tops out around $200! The situation is even worse on ebay for that one.

I managed to pick up a used library copy for $2 a few years ago, perhaps my greatest cookbook find.

Luckily, I bought that one while it was still in print. More in line with this thread, I really want a new copy of Irene Kuo's Key to Chinese Cooking, but I'm not paying $100+ for it.

Abebooks has a bunch in the $14 range.

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I have both these books. they were in a dusty pile of cookbooks + in a room i rarely go into, mice may have had a bite, but

happy days are here again.

:biggrin:

thanks for the nudge to take a peak into the Past.

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I have Florence Lin's book, and I love it. Made the jiao zhi (fried dumplings) and it is my go-to recipe for both the wrapper skin and filling.

I am not at home so don't have access to the book, but I also found a (obscure) recipe for panfried yam pancakes that I ate and thoroughly enjoyed at a restaurant, the owners of which are hanging up their woks unfortunately. There are many other recipes that I have marked down that I want to try, but so many books, recipes and so little time to do them all.

It is definitely worthwhile having in your collection.

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Don't give up on the used copy search -- just nabbed one off amazon for US$35 -- totally within reach of mere mortals!

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