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Jen Keenan

Thai Cooking at Home, 2007 – 2012

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Does anyone know how I can contact David Thompson ("Thai Food")?

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Another dinner from Thai Food:

Soup of minced pork, scallions, and shiitake mushrooms. The soup base was chicken stock, soy sauce, and a pinch of sugar. We added ground pork, sliced scallions, and shiitake mushrooms, and finished the soup with cilantro and white pepper. The bowl is a little empty because the family nearly finished the soup before I sat down. :biggrin:

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Mom Leaung Neuang’s famous satay: strip steak marinated with coconut cream, turmeric, sweetened condensed milk, fish sauce, bourbon, and a paste of shallots and roasted peanuts, cumin, and coriander seed. We sprinkled on the excess marinade while the satay was on the grill. This was one of my favorite satays ever.

Coconut crab salad (“mock frog salad”): Thai basil, sliced shallots and lemongrass, with shredded chiles, Thai lime leaves, and long-leaf coriander. We warmed cooked crab meat with coconut cream, palm sugar, fish sauce, and lime juice, mixed everything together, and topped the salad with ground roasted peanuts.

Cucumbers and jasmine rice to round out the meal.

gallery_42956_2536_29351.jpg

*drooooooooool* Can I come to dinner? I'll make something!!!!!!!!!!!

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Something different......

I've been playing lately with ideas from the Lao or lam, and roasting my eggplants and chillis, and then grinding the roasted veggies down and adding it into the curry.

It really chunks it up nicely, and gives that Luang Prabang smokiness. You don't get the smooth coconut delivery of a central plains Thai, and it's not the coconut free clean of the North, but it does make for an interesting combination of texture and taste (I'm a sucker for coconut).

However, it isn't pretty. So we won't worry about pictures of "brown" food.

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Something different......

I've been playing lately with ideas from the Lao or lam, and roasting my eggplants and chillis, and then grinding the roasted veggies down and adding it into the curry. 

It really chunks it up nicely, and gives that Luang Prabang smokiness.  You don't get the smooth coconut delivery of a central plains Thai, and it's not the coconut free clean of the North, but it does make for an interesting combination of texture and taste (I'm a sucker for coconut).

However, it isn't pretty.  So we won't worry about pictures of "brown" food.

Awww nothing wrong with brown UNDIGESTED food. :P

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*drooooooooool* Can I come to dinner? I'll make something!!!!!!!!!!!

OnigiriFB, thank you! Sure, stop in next time you are in the neighborhood, and make whatever you like – I am sure that it will be delicious.

Awww nothing wrong with brown UNDIGESTED food. :P

:laugh::laugh::laugh:

Peter, I would love to see your experiments, however brown.

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Awww nothing wrong with brown UNDIGESTED food. :P

:laugh::laugh::laugh:

Peter, I would love to see your experiments, however brown.

gallery_22892_3828_49160.jpg

I dunno, this looks pretty close to Onigiri's description of what can be "wrong".

The long strands are fermented bamboo, and the big chunky bits used to be chicken meat. Oh, and there was a big handful of fresh basil, some of which manages to give a glimmer of spectral diversity.

A nice smoky, burnt flavour, but it's just not pretty. (Maybe some red food dye?)

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Peter, when you say roasting eggplant

1) how do you roast?

2) what stage do you take the eggplant to (how does the skin look?)

3) do you remove the skin

4) do you mean blending the cooked result? is it wet? grinding says dry to me but that might be the English (rather than US) use of the word

5) then what?

:smile:

cheers

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Awww nothing wrong with brown UNDIGESTED food. :P

:laugh::laugh::laugh:

Peter, I would love to see your experiments, however brown.

gallery_22892_3828_49160.jpg

I dunno, this looks pretty close to Onigiri's description of what can be "wrong".

The long strands are fermented bamboo, and the big chunky bits used to be chicken meat. Oh, and there was a big handful of fresh basil, some of which manages to give a glimmer of spectral diversity.

A nice smoky, burnt flavour, but it's just not pretty. (Maybe some red food dye?)

Looks good to me. I bet the smokey flavor is great! Did you add a little sugar to meld the flavors better? I bet with good fish sauce and all the curry paste it was mighty tasty. Sugar though if you didn't bother with it. Best if it's palm sugar then you'll get the caramel type sweet as opposed to the staight sweet of regular sugar. The caramel will meld with the smokey flavor and create a front taste that should meld on your tongue into the salty smokey bitter taste that makes a good curry GREAT! (ok I feel like Tony the Tiger :P)

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Peter, when you say roasting eggplant

1) how do you roast?

2) what stage do you take the eggplant to (how does the skin look?)

3) do you remove the skin

4) do you mean blending the cooked result? is it wet? grinding says dry to me but that might be the English (rather than US) use of the word

5) then what?

:smile:

cheers

I use the open flame of the bbq out back, turned to medium, and then turn to get fairly even blacking of the skin. The inside of the eggplant is just giving up some wetness when I cut in.

I scrub off the blister on the skin, but leave the part that argues adequately with me. I want that "burnt" element in there.

The chilis I just char a bit, but looking here for more of a light charring. I also use a head of garlic, as I like roasted garlic.

Once everything off the fire I chop it into manageable bits, and then put it all into the cusinart for a wet mix, except for the garlic, which I squeeze out of the skin like pustules (I could use the mortar and pestle for a bump and grind - which would also be wet with these ingredients - but I'm just dog lazy. Hey, I've been outside grilling in 115 degree weather! Have some mercy :blink: ).

Then it was work up the coconut cream, add in some red curry paste (I've still got some of those chunky wet sachets), fry in extra garlic (you can never have too much garlic) toss in some julienned kaffir lime leaf, get the nose wilting, and then work in the chicken meat. Once that's skin-fried, then it's add more coconut cream, include the blended veggies, add in the fermented bamboo strips, and let come up to a boil.

I've found that the grater I use for parmesan works well on those otherwise indestructible cow patties of palm sugar. I'll season the mix with nampla and palm sugar.

When it's ready, add the last bit of coconut cream, hit it with some lime to balance, and then cut the heat and toss in a handful of basil to wilt in.

It's very important when you do all this, as a guy, to try and use way more dishes and gear than any woman would think humanly possible. Ideally, you should have a mess that stretches from the yard, through the kitchen, in and out of the pantry, and with the sinks stacked up.

If you're a woman, you've probably got one pot and a knife to wash up. I don't know how you do it.

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I am highly offended by this word: pustules *throws up in mouth a little* Dude I thought the picture looks yummy. That word makes me wanna awk (throw up)!

Um... never thought of a cheese grater for palm sugar. I usually just shave it with a sharp knife? (Another trick us women do to make only one dirty pot and one dirty knife. It's something woman learn from having to clean up after dirty men and boys so we learn that when WE do something we need to be neat.)

LIME????? In curry??????? *boggle* :huh::blink:

To each his own :raz:

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Um... never thought of a cheese grater for palm sugar. I usually just shave it with a sharp knife? (Another trick us women do to make only one dirty pot and one dirty knife. It's something woman learn from having to clean up after dirty men and boys so we learn that when WE do something we need to be neat.)

Yoonhi made me use the grater for the sugar. She didn't share my benevolence regarding feeding the ants with stray bits of sugar all over the floor.

LIME????? In curry??????? *boggle*  :huh:  :blink:

To each his own  :raz:

A bit of tamarind for the acid would've been better, but we were out. Anyways, in Luang Prabang you'd generally hit just about everything with a bang of lime at the end, and I was extemporizing from Phia Sing's book.

Tonight it's salt baked chicken. I love doing salt domes. I can reallly trash out the kitchen. :biggrin: (mind you, that'll have to go in the China thread)


Edited by Peter Green (log)

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Huh not familiar with Laotian food, like the real Luang Prabang stuff but I can see that. I guess without the coconut milk base that it wouldn't curdle. Um, I noticed you did not apologize for pustules! *shudder* I don't even like typing that I copy and pasted last time  :hmmm:

I figured the less I said about it, the better off you would be :raz:

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Huh not familiar with Laotian food, like the real Luang Prabang stuff but I can see that. I guess without the coconut milk base that it wouldn't curdle. Um, I noticed you did not apologize for pustules! *shudder* I don't even like typing that I copy and pasted last time  :hmmm:

I figured the less I said about it, the better off you would be :raz:

LOL! No no no didn't a Thai lady teach you that you must always apologize even if it's not your fault? Now say after me Koah Toad Krup

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LIME????? In curry??????? *boggle*  :huh:  :blink:

To each his own  :raz:

What's the problem?

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LIME????? In curry??????? *boggle*  :huh:  :blink:

To each his own  :raz:

What's the problem?

I'm used to coconut based curries and the addition of lime would curdle it wouldn't it? Make it look like off milk? *shudder* I think tastewise it might be good. Just concerned about appereance. Vain of me I know. :rolleyes::laugh:

I wouldn't know, I'm still waiting for my granite mortar and pestle to arrive. Being in the food biz, appearance is important to me as well. I can't say I won't experiment with this though. :raz:

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LIME????? In curry??????? *boggle*  :huh:  :blink:

To each his own  :raz:

What's the problem?

I'm used to coconut based curries and the addition of lime would curdle it wouldn't it? Make it look like off milk? *shudder* I think tastewise it might be good. Just concerned about appereance. Vain of me I know. :rolleyes::laugh:

I wouldn't know, I'm still waiting for my granite mortar and pestle to arrive. Being in the food biz, appearance is important to me as well. I can't say I won't experiment with this though. :raz:

Onigiri and I worked this one out offline. Hitting it with lime at the end won't curdle things, so don't worry.

But I still figure the dish (as I've done it) looks ugly enough that some more disfigurement would hardly hurt.

:biggrin:

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LIME????? In curry??????? *boggle*  :huh:  :blink:

To each his own  :raz:

What's the problem?

I'm used to coconut based curries and the addition of lime would curdle it wouldn't it? Make it look like off milk? *shudder* I think tastewise it might be good. Just concerned about appereance. Vain of me I know. :rolleyes::laugh:

lime juice is quite commonly added to certain gaeng 'curries' in Thailand...don't worry OnigiriFB, it won't curdle yr dish :wink:

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LIME????? In curry??????? *boggle*  :huh:  :blink:

To each his own  :raz:

What's the problem?

I'm used to coconut based curries and the addition of lime would curdle it wouldn't it? Make it look like off milk? *shudder* I think tastewise it might be good. Just concerned about appereance. Vain of me I know. :rolleyes::laugh:

lime juice is quite commonly added to certain gaeng 'curries' in Thailand...don't worry OnigiriFB, it won't curdle yr dish :wink:

REALLY!!??? I didn't know that? Um, like the central region? Isaan region? The southern? Or the Northern? I can see Isaan, southern, and northern. I can't think of anything in the central. They use tamarind but not lime to my knowledge.

:wub: I love that this thread is getting more and more post! I've been trying to get a Thai friend interested in egullet just to up this thread more and more. :smile:

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LIME????? In curry??????? *boggle*  :huh:  :blink:

To each his own  :raz:

What's the problem?

I'm used to coconut based curries and the addition of lime would curdle it wouldn't it? Make it look like off milk? *shudder* I think tastewise it might be good. Just concerned about appereance. Vain of me I know. :rolleyes::laugh:

I wouldn't know, I'm still waiting for my granite mortar and pestle to arrive. Being in the food biz, appearance is important to me as well. I can't say I won't experiment with this though. :raz:

Onigiri and I worked this one out offline. Hitting it with lime at the end won't curdle things, so don't worry.

But I still figure the dish (as I've done it) looks ugly enough that some more disfigurement would hardly hurt.

:biggrin:

Yup! Mai ben rai khon bha (sorry sorry but er ya kinda are teasing teasing :P) sai manaow nai gaeng curry! Wierdo! :rolleyes::laugh:

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REALLY!!??? I didn't know that? Um, like the central region? Isaan region? The southern? Or the Northern? I can see Isaan, southern, and northern. I can't think of anything in the central. They use tamarind but not lime to my knowledge.

well, when I learned to cook with my friends in Rawai they did commonly use manao, thor thot ka OFB, I also speak reasonable Thai, sorry if I offended you, unintended, just passing on my experience over 10 yrs there


Edited by weinoo (log)

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lime juice is quite commonly added to certain gaeng 'curries' in Thailand...don't worry OnigiriFB, it won't curdle yr dish  :wink:

I often use lime juice (along with fish sauce, sugar/palm sugar, etc.) to adjust the flavors of coconut milk curries just before serving. It may or may not be traditional, but it tastes good to me and the curry has never curdled. Perhaps that makes me a weirdo, too. :wink:

insomniac, do you know which curries traditionally use lime juice vs. tamarind vs. something else as last-minute souring agent?

Peter, I have eaten many delicious things that look a lot like your picture. Beauty is in the eyes (and tastebuds) of the beholder.

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REALLY!!??? I didn't know that? Um, like the central region? Isaan region? The southern? Or the Northern? I can see Isaan, southern, and northern. I can't think of anything in the central. They use tamarind but not lime to my knowledge.

well, when I learned to cook with my friends in Rawai they did commonly use manao, thor thot ka OFB, I also speak reasonable Thai, sorry if I offended you, unintended, just passing on my experience over 10 yrs there

No no no no offence. I was just surprised. Um, I hope I didn't offend anyone with my Thai to Peter up above. Rawaii... is in??? Remind me? I forget. I actually don't know THAT much about Thailand most of my knowledge is just what I picked up living there and growing up Thai. Um... my Aunties tried their hardest to make me a gurasatree Thai and made me help in the kitchen but I couldn't really cook when I first got back to the States. I think some of it must have sunk in subconsciously though. :blink:

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lime juice is quite commonly added to certain gaeng 'curries' in Thailand...don't worry OnigiriFB, it won't curdle yr dish  :wink:

I often use lime juice (along with fish sauce, sugar/palm sugar, etc.) to adjust the flavors of coconut milk curries just before serving. It may or may not be traditional, but it tastes good to me and the curry has never curdled. Perhaps that makes me a weirdo, too. :wink:

insomniac, do you know which curries traditionally use lime juice vs. tamarind vs. something else as last-minute souring agent?

Peter, I have eaten many delicious things that look a lot like your picture. Beauty is in the eyes (and tastebuds) of the beholder.

hey Bruce, I guess my use of lime juice was a local habit, I certainly couldn't say that it was traditional as my friends are all my age and not living with their parents...all I have ever used as a souring agent are tamarind and the dreaded lime juice...

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