• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Beth Wilson

"Chocolates and Confections"

10 posts in this topic

I was checking out Amazon and I discovered Peter Greweling has a new book coming out. Well, not really a totally new book but a new edition of Chocolates & Confections.

http://www.amazon.co...r/dp/0470424419

I have his first two books and I have used them with great success. The first book was a great reference book for my Food Chemistry course last year, actually it was a whole lot more informative than the text I had to buy for the course.

I am having a hard time deciding if I want to put the money down and pre-order this book too. Decisions Decisions.

I think I am leaning towards getting it anyway. His books have been great so far. Anyone got an opinion on picking this book up if you have the other two?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just got an email from amazon that the release date is sooner then November, should have it by the end of this month!

Sent from my DROID X2 using Tapatalk 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

About time: I sold my old edition back when this one was announced to pay for the new one!


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for posting that info minas6907. Wish the author indicated where his various photos are being used... would buy some other cookbooks based on those photos.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think those photos are all in various CIA books. I recognize some from The Professional Chef and The Modern Cafe for sure (ans obviously Chocolates and Confections), and I'm going to assume also Garde Manger, and possibly The Art of Charcuterie. Not able to pinpoint them all though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My copy arrived today: some first impressions (I have not made anything from the new edition yet)...

It's considerably larger than the first edition: the bulk of the new material appears to be expansion of the text itself, covering more ground in more detail at the beginning of each chapter. There are some new recipes, but that was not the focus of this revision. As was true of the first edition the text is clear and concise: I appreciate the additional details given regarding decorating molded chocolates (for instance). I think that the book remains the most definitive confectionery reference available, and if you don't own the first edition the new edition would definitely be a great resource for you. If you already own the first edition things are less clear. I certainly wouldn't suggest keeping both: if you want the new edition, sell your first edition (I think amazon is still offering a few dollars, but I bet there are a lot of amateur confectioners who wouldn't mind a cheap copy of the first edition either). Is it worth upgrading? Well... probably only if you're the obsessive-compulsive type. Then again, that might still be most confectioners out there!


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By HeatherAvila
      Ideas on why enrobed marshmallows stored at room temp (68 deg F) have recrystallized sugar particles while the same batch of enrobed marshmallow stored airtight in a cooler (40 deg F) do not?
       
      I'm all ears!
       
      Thanks,
      Heather
    • By pastrygirl
      Do you ever end up with ganache that reminds you of extra-heavy mayo?  I was winging it today, testing batches that set up ok but grainy, then weirldy flexible. The 60% i usually use is 39% cocoa butter, but in this batch I used 72%, which is 45% fat.  I also made some other changes but was trying to keep a similar ratio of liquid to chocolate.  The 72% ganache is far thicker than the 60% ever is - it probably needs more cream or a splash of booze, right?  Arg, I should know this!
       
      I got annoyed and left the slab out to do whatever it will overnight - cross your fingers that it is either use-able or save-able tomorrow!
    • By minas6907
      Hey all, I got a question for you who make pate de fruit on a regular basis. I know it's quite simple to pour the finished pate de fruit into a frame, but does anyone here use a confectionery funnel to deposit them into forms? I'm asking because in Notters 'Art of the Chocolatier' it seems his primary way of making the jellies is to deposit the mixture into a flexipan, and his alternate method is to pour it into a frame. I'm wondering simply if anyone does/has done this before. The jellies seem to set quite quickly, and I'm not sure if you just need to be super fast with this or not. I want to try it, but shy away (I need to get appropriate forms first) because I keep feeling like I'll end up with half the mixture deposited and the other half solidified in the funnel. I assume warming the stainless funnel will aid the process, but I also assume that you have one attempt at this, and you cant rewarm the mixture as you would with fondant or gummies. Anyways, just a question I wanted to put out there. Thanks!
       
       
      Host's note: this is the second part of an extended topic that has been split in order to reduce load on our servers.  
      The first part is here: Pâte de Fruits (Fruit Paste/Fruit Jellies) (Part 1)
    • By elizabethnathan
      I buy pate de fruits whenever I find them, and particularly like these: http://www.recchiutichocolates.com/home.htm.
      Now I'd love to try making them. Any tips?
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.