Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

tikidoc

Getting a whole pig, advice for butchering?

Recommended Posts

We recently moved to rural Virginia, and have found a local farmer selling whole pastured hogs and we are buying one, about 400# on the hoof. They will deliver to a closely USDA approved butcher, and I could use some suggestions as to how to instruct the butcher, and any good resources online, so I can get the most out of the pig. In addition to the major cuts, I'm planning to ask for the extra fat, the caul fat, soup bones, probably some skin, and for all the scraps to be packaged in pieces rather than ground, so I can grind it myself for sausage. Any other tips? And good ideas for things to do with pig organ meats? Is it worth taking the head or should I just stick with the jowls (hubby is a bit squeamish about the head)?

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You will want to get the fat around the kidneys to render into leaf lard. It's wonderful for pastry.

Tim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lots of good stuff in a pig.

Make sure you get the belly's whole so you can either slow cook them or cure your own bacon. (pork belly recipe is on my blog)

I'd keep the head & boil it then pick it apart to make head cheese. You should find some good recipes on the web. Also, don't forget the trotters, pickled pigs feet are a favorite of mine. The hocks are also a great cut, slowly cooked with beans they're ideal in winter.

Are you going to try for your own dry cured ham? It takes a while, but its worth it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a good size pig, but what breed is it? Also, how do you normally use your pork? Are you planning on curing anything, if so, what? Do you want whole muscles or want to butcher it yourself? You can always get the primal cuts and practice your butchery.

If you have them butcher it, make sure they remove the tenderloin before separating the mid-section and the ham. Some places don't and waste about 1/3 of the tenderloin cutting it off and leaving it in the ham. I would also make sure they leave the bones in the belly. There aren't too many, but many people scrap them along with their meat. Instead, leave them in and get all that good flavor in your bacon, braise or whatever.

As far as offal goes, I would take all of it. Liver is great for pate, kidney is good sauteed, the head is very good for a head cheese, braise or if you are adventurous porchetta di testa (pictured below). The ears fry up deliciously like cracklings and the tail can be treated similarly. The shanks braise very well and as mentioned the trotters add body to a soup. The heart is good for a braise or can be cured. If it is a less hairy breed you request everything skin on (if this is accommodated by the abattoir and butcher). Pork rinds aren't too much work, but are delicious and the skin will protect the shoulders and hams during long cooks, if that's what you are into.

5%252520Cross-section%25252002.JPG


Andrew Vaserfirer aka avaserfi

Host, eG Forums

avaserfirer@egstaff.org

eG Ethics Signatory

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you get some pork shoulder with skin on it, you can make Pernil, as from this recently revived EGullet thread:

I'll vote for headcheese, also. Just make sure hubby doesn't see you cooking it. If you put the finished headcheese in front of him, it will be a delicious, interesting pate or terrine with little crunchy bits (from cartilage, including the ears and snout).

I like the roasted pork liver that is sometimes available in Chinatown. It's marinated in an Asian sauce, then roasted and sliced (think of the Chinese roast duck treatment). I've always eaten it at room temp as a side dish with other items and steamed rice or noodles. Some people say the liver-y flavor is too strong. Maybe it's an acquired taste.

You're cooking the pig's feet, aren't you? The cold weather is perfect for making something hearty with pig's feet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thats a big pig! I just butchered three Tamworths last week, about 90kg each (about 200lbs each?). At that size any joints and chops you get are generally too big for my use, although I did cut a few chops for comedy value!

I bone the loins and cure for 'breakfast' back bacon.

I keep the blade (I think in the US you call it Boston Butt) for pulled pork.

Belly is about half on the bone (the ribs) and half off. On the bone I keep for roasting. Off the bone I cure for pancetta style bacon.

Shoulders and most of the leg I mince (grind) for sausages and salami.

Some leg meat I package up to cook as lean pork in stir frys.

I keep the lower third of two brine cure for boiling hams. These are more than big enough to feed 6.

I keep the cheeks and brains. The rest of the head I hack decent bits of meat to go in the sausage pile. I like brawn but I'm the only one in the house that does and I still have some left in the freezer from last years pigs so the rest of the heads have gone for the dog, and various birds of prey.

Livers and kidneys I like to stir fry, or I might get round to some country style Pate with kidneys. It's gone in the freezer for now. I always have the best intentions for the lungs but most of them end up outside for the birds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're cooking the pig's feet, aren't you? The cold weather is perfect for making something hearty with pig's feet.

I have the wrong pigs or I'm doing this wrong, but I can never get any meat off trotters. I keep them for stock. What recipes do you use?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, thanks for all the suggestions - I'm taking notes for the sheet that goes to the butcher - they have a sheet you are supposed to fill out, but I'm going to attach an extra sheet. I'm going to try to keep pretty much everything, so yes, feet, head, etc. I've never had feet but I'm willing to give it a try. I'm asking for skin-on wherever possible.

Avaserfi, the pig is a 9 month old Tamsworth/Gloucestershire Old Spots cross, raised primarily on raw milk and pasture - minimal grain. Old Spots get pretty big so I guess he takes after that side of the family!

As for how we use pork, it is really pretty variable. We do pulled pork, roast Cuban style, grilled tenderloin. I recently picked up a book on charcuterie and we have a ceramic smoker (similar to a big green egg) so we are planning on doing our own smoking and curing. Unfortunately, I have yet to find a good and reasonably priced vacuum sealer for home use, so I think I will ask them to cut the primals into manageable chunks. No steaks but maybe 3 big pieces per side of the loin (bone in) and the shoulder and hams cut into ~5# pieces. The sides, I will get whole, since we will likely smoke/cure one side at a time.

Keep the advice coming!!!


Edited by tikidoc (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're cooking the pig's feet, aren't you? The cold weather is perfect for making something hearty with pig's feet.

I have the wrong pigs or I'm doing this wrong, but I can never get any meat off trotters. I keep them for stock. What recipes do you use?

Doubt it's just you (or your pigs). Meat yield will depend entirely on where the trotters are lopped off.


 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Is it worth taking the head or should I just stick with the jowls (hubby is a bit squeamish about the head)?

I don't eat brains anymore but you must keep the jowls and the ears. Fresh double-thick chops are my favouritepart of a farm fresh pig, along with the belly.


Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're cooking the pig's feet, aren't you? The cold weather is perfect for making something hearty with pig's feet.

I have the wrong pigs or I'm doing this wrong, but I can never get any meat off trotters. I keep them for stock. What recipes do you use?

There's not that much meat in pig's feet anyway. Mostly it's gelatinous, fatty skin. I have fond memories of it from my childhood, when my parents stewed it Asian-style. It was very warming for those New England winters. The sauce in this recipe is similar to how my parents cooked pig's feet, although they never bothered with niceties like mushrooms or eggs. I remember the base of garlic, ginger, soy, & five spice powder.

http://sunflower-recipes.blogspot.com/2009/10/southern-taiwanese-stewed-pork-rice.html

The last time I cooked with a pig's foot, I tossed it into a braised beef dish to enrich the sauce. Before service I removed the bones and the skin. This recipe from the Zuni Cafe cookbook calls for a pig's foot if you use chicken stock instead of beef stock, but I'm pretty sure I used beef stock and a pig's foot. Is there such a thing as a beef stew that is too rich?

http://kayaksoup.blogspot.com/2006/12/zuni-cafe-brasato.html

High on my list for this winter is Gratin of Pig's Foot with Vin Jaune and Comte Cheese, from Paula Wolfert's Mediterranean Clay Pot Cooking. The first page of the recipe is available on Googlebooks. After that, you can figure out how to make a gratin. Here, page 178:

http://books.google.com/books?id=HT6D2fD4qIwC&pg=PA178&lpg=PA178&dq=gratin+of+pig's+foot+with+vin+jaune+and+comte+cheese&source=bl&ots=GL-wfphVNj&sig=chgojZXT-FS4ITVoHZ4_pkj4We4&hl=en&ei=O6S4Tpu-GaXniALB35TmBA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&sqi=2&ved=0CBoQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q&f=false

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We recently moved to rural Virginia, and have found a local farmer selling whole pastured hogs and we are buying one, about 400# on the hoof. They will deliver to a closely USDA approved butcher, and I could use some suggestions as to how to instruct the butcher, and any good resources online, so I can get the most out of the pig. In addition to the major cuts, I'm planning to ask for the extra fat, the caul fat, soup bones, probably some skin, and for all the scraps to be packaged in pieces rather than ground, so I can grind it myself for sausage. Any other tips? And good ideas for things to do with pig organ meats? Is it worth taking the head or should I just stick with the jowls (hubby is a bit squeamish about the head)?

Thanks!

First there is no "closely USDA approved butcher" but only meat processors who have USDA Inspectors on-site. The carcass is then stamped if inspected and approved.

Second, I know of no pig that's 400# in 9 months. Check your source for either weight or age. Market hogs go about 200#'s.

There have been a lot of good suggestions already on this thread, certainly the head whole or cracked to bone out the external fat and flesh for headcheese. I don't use the brain but the ears are good and crunchy. You can render the fat but its a big job as well as preparing the skin for cracklins. Most cuts are standard in the industry for the USA and you should have no problem. Do you have a big freezer to accommodate the animal?

Lastly, good luck!-Dick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry, the word "closely" was a typo, should be close-by. Autocorrect strikes again.

And yes, we have a pretty big freezer. It fit most of a year old steer last year. And we have a couple old refrigerators we have acquired over the years that can be put into service if we need a little more freezer space.

Not sure on the size, I am going by what the farmer told me. Even if quite a bit smaller, the price is reasonable for a heritage breed pig (actually a cross of two heritage breeds), fed a diet that makes for healthy eating. I guess we'll see once it goes to the butcher. Our local high-end butcher (who is awesome, by the way, but I can't afford him for every day) who buys mostly local grass fed animals for his shop (including from Polyface Farm, which is fairly close) charges a lot more than what I will be paying for the pig and the butcher, even if I cut the estimated weight substantially.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

tikidoc, Up above, in a previous post, you mentioned that you do Cuban roast pork. If your recipe comes even close to the taste of the pork used in the Cuban sandwiches in Key West I'll gladly swap my Danish grandmother's old recipe for what she called "liver paste" (Pâté) using pork liver. Some of the best I ever had. :smile:

Edited to add: Polyface farm is close? Lucky you. Have you gone over there and visited?


Edited by Country (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Country, I think the two most important ingredients for Cuban pork roast are time and good pork. But I'll dig up the recipe I have used and post it here. It's been a while since I made it. And I'd love a recipe for pork liver. I don't think I have ever eaten pork liver. Come to think of it, I think all the livers I have eaten have been from birds (or one kind of fish).

And yes, we have been to Polyface once, even briefly met Joel Salatin. He seems like a real character. We recently moved from a small farm in the Johnson City TN area to another small farm about 1/2 hour west of Richmond, 3 miles from the epicenter of the earthquake in August. Anyone want to buy a beautiful custom log home with a killer kitchen on 22 acres in TN, LOL? Anyway, we stopped at Polyface once on a trip between TN and VA. It's a fascinating place. Way off the beaten path - you have to take all kinds of narrow twisty roads to get to the farm. Looks kinda dumpy, honestly, but remarkably efficient in use of resources, and pretty doesn't grow livestock. One of our "to do" projects is building a chicken tractor based on Salatin's design, which is a moveable pen that you can use to have the birds pick over the manure of the cows and horses, making for healthier birds and pastures. Maybe next spring, when we get some broiler chicks. We just have a small flock of laying hens at the moment. We also learned from him about a breed of broilers that we want to try, the "Freedom Ranger", which puts on weight fairly quickly but acts like a fairly normal chicken, unlike the Cornish crosses used for most commercial birds. We raised a crop of them for the freezer once and they were freaks. They literally did not walk, just sat next to their feed bowl and ate and crapped in one location. No interest in "free ranging".

Anyone who lives in this part of the country who has an interest in farming, either as a fellow farmer or as a consumer, should try to stop by Polyface at some point (or at least take a look at Salatin's books).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tikidoc - I'm pretty swamped with stuff to do right now, but I'll post the liver paste recipe later. It's an old recipe that includes putting the liver through a hand grinder three times.... But, there are probably easier ways to do it with modern appliances. :smile:

I know what you mean, raising those Cornish crosses. Years ago, I grew them for a couple of years and they could barely get around outside. By the time they were ready to be killed they'd worn off all their breast feathers. Pitiful, really. More meat, and decent meat, but it wasn't a pretty sight seeing them trying to get around.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great thread

Would love to try this myself someday.

Just got a new grinder that would take care of a good chunk of the pig :smile:

Shane

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with others that 400+ lbs is a monster hog. The biggest I've ever handled whole was 325 lb. It took four of us to carry it, not just because of the weight but also the sheer size.

If you decide to back out of using the whole head but are going to be curing, you can still make some great guanciale from the jowels.


Chief Scientist / Amateur Cook

MadVal, Seattle, WA

Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Country, no hurry, the hog doesn't even go to the butcher until the first week of December, so we won't have it until a couple weeks later. And we are never growing Cornish crosses again. They stink, they have a really high mortality rate compared to other chickens, and they are just disgusting creatures. Not worth it for the meat, and when I eat them I just picture those nasty creatures wallowing in their own poop. I threw away the skin when I ate them for that reason. Blech.

Vengroff, I contacted the farmer and this is what she said:

" I used the formula on this site http://www.thepigsite.com/articles/541/weighing-a-pig-without-a-scale. He has a 53 inch girth and 59 inch length. Using the formula 53 inches squared gives me 2,809 multiplied by length gives me 165,731, divided by 400 equals 414.33 pounds. His weight. Hanging weight is usually 75%, this web site says 72%. So multiply 414.33 pounds by 72% and that will give a hanging weight of 298.52 pounds."

And "I do feed different than the average hog feeder, not too many have milk cows to feed raw milk :) We do not feed garbage. They are feed quality grass and grass hay too, I eat them too so I am feeding them what I want to eat. My hogs do not smell because they are healthy. I have heard hogs fed garbage and on concrete and small pens can stink but mine don't. They are tame and love scratches so they live a good life outside on dirt not concrete where they can be hogs. Another thing, mine actually have room to get exercise."

Looking forward to non-supermarket pork.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There have been a lot of good suggestions already on this thread, certainly the head whole or cracked to bone out the external fat and flesh for headcheese.

You might want to ask the butcher to split the head and remove the brain, if you are making headcheese. Also to ask the butcher to split the feet for easier handling.

Meanwhile, I came across this recipe for country pate, using fresh pork liver, while flipping through Susan Loomis' Cooking At Home On Rue Tatin.

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Pate-de-Campagne-105269

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Vengroff, I contacted the farmer and this is what she said:

" I used the formula on this site http://www.thepigsite.com/articles/541/weighing-a-pig-without-a-scale. He has a 53 inch girth and 59 inch length. Using the formula 53 inches squared gives me 2,809 multiplied by length gives me 165,731, divided by 400 equals 414.33 pounds. His weight. Hanging weight is usually 75%, this web site says 72%. So multiply 414.33 pounds by 72% and that will give a hanging weight of 298.52 pounds."

That makes sense. I was thinking hanging weight. In any case, if your experience is anything like mine was you will be amazed just how large and unruly a hog that size is on the butchering table.


Chief Scientist / Amateur Cook

MadVal, Seattle, WA

Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This thread gives new dimension to "Go big or go home."


Who cares how time advances? I am drinking ale today. -- Edgar Allan Poe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Vengroff, I contacted the farmer and this is what she said:

" I used the formula on this site http://www.thepigsite.com/articles/541/weighing-a-pig-without-a-scale. He has a 53 inch girth and 59 inch length. Using the formula 53 inches squared gives me 2,809 multiplied by length gives me 165,731, divided by 400 equals 414.33 pounds. His weight. Hanging weight is usually 75%, this web site says 72%. So multiply 414.33 pounds by 72% and that will give a hanging weight of 298.52 pounds."

That makes sense. I was thinking hanging weight. In any case, if your experience is anything like mine was you will be amazed just how large and unruly a hog that size is on the butchering table.

No I won't, because I will not see the pig until he is in neat little vacuum packed packages!

The chronology - I pay the farmer, the farmer delivers the pig to the butcher, the butcher processes the pig, I pay the butcher for their services and pick up the packages!

I'll do my own chickens (not happily) but that's my limit!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"No I won't, because I will not see the pig until he is in neat little vacuum packed packages!"

Please explain how your processors packages? I have never seen any processor use anything other than standard butcher paper and tape.-Dick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By Glen
      Looking to learn and ask questions about home curing meats.  I have an 11 lb batch of genoa salami going and it is my first batch.  Worried about the PH level not dropping as needed.  Need some advice.   I followed the Marianski recipe exactly.  I have a pH meter and the starting point was 6.15pH which I thought was unusually high.  2.5 months in, I am about 73% of starting weight yet my pH is only 5.88pH.  My curing chamber is consistently at 57deg. F. /80% humidity.  My pH tester seems calibrated properly using the calibration solutions.  I am using the meat probe adapter and just sticking it in the salami until the tip is submerged etc...Thanks in advance for any suggestions or reassurances. 
       
      Glen

    • By liuzhou
      It is possibly not well-known that China has some wonderful hams, up there with the best that Spain can offer. This lack of wide -knowledge, at least in the USA, is mainly down to regulations forbidding their importation. However, for travellers to China and those in  places with less restrictive policies, here are some of the best.
       
      This article from the WSJ is a good introduction to one of the best - Xuanwei Ham 宣威火腿  (xuān wēi huǒ tuǐ) from Yunnan province.
      This Ingredient Makes Everything Better
      I can usually obtain Xuanwei ham here around the Chinese New Year/Spring Festival, but I also have a good friend who lives in Yunnan who sends me regular supplies. The article compares it very favourably with jamon iberico, a sentiment with which I heartily agree.



      Xuanwei Ham
       

      Xuanwei Ham
       
      more coming soon.
       
       
    • By Daily Gullet Staff
      by Chris Amirault

      Anyone who wants to write about food would do well to stay away from similes and metaphors, because if you're not careful, expressions like 'light as a feather' make their way into your sentences and then where are you?

      - Nora Ephron

      I attended a training last fall at which we were asked to share an object representing something important about mentoring, our focus for the week. I suspect that few in the workshop had difficulty coming up with their tape measures, baby photos, and flower pots, but I usually find this sort of assignment challenging, preferring simple denotations to forced connotations.

      On the drive home, I rolled down the windows, sensing that the air was turning slightly crisp and cool. I savored that harbinger of autumn in New England, when my thoughts turn to braises, stews and charcuterie. After a summer of keeping the oven off in my non-air-conditioned kitchen, I dreamed of daubes, considered new curries, and generally jonesed for the promise of meat to come.

      And then I realized that I had a perfect metaphor for mentoring: my 5 lb. vertical sausage stuffer from Grizzly Industrial, Inc. The next day, I lugged the apparatus to the training, hiding it behind a door for fear of ridicule. When my turn arrived, I hauled it out and clunked it down dramatically on the center table. "Good mentoring is like a sausage stuffer," I said, "for at least ten reasons:

      + + +

      That's the article as I started writing it. But over time, Nora's words came to haunt me. The whole shtick began to smell a bit fishy, and I began to fear that, like many tropes, this metaphor turned attention away from a trickier, worrisome truth hiding in plain view.

      But unlike many tropes, the worrisome truth I was hiding is in the object, and not the subject, of the metaphor. That is, the metaphor wasn't really about my relationship to mentoring. It was really about my relationship to sausage.

      Imagine the scene: I whip out my sausage maker and give ten reasons why my metaphor is bigger and better than everyone else's. (I did mention that I was the only man among three dozen women in that training, didn't I?) Laugh if you want, but one's sausage is important to many a man. A quick perusal of this topic reveals that I'm not alone. (You did notice the gender breakdown in that topic, didn't you?)

      Last weekend, while in the unfinished basement of a chef buddy, talk turned to our sausages, and before long we four charcuterie nuts were looking at our feet and commiserating about our failures. We shared a bond: our sausages had the better of us, and we knew it. Pathetic though it is, are you surprised that I felt a deep sense of relief, even of control, when I walked through my ten reasons? My metaphor afforded me a rare opportunity to feel superior to the process of sausage-making, and believe me, that doesn't happen often.

      My name is Chris A., and I have sausage anxiety.

      Read that list up there about my sausage maker, the instrument that I describe with distanced assurance. It's a ruse, I tell you. No matter how often I try to buck up, no matter how definitive a recipe, no matter how wonderful a pork butt or a lamb shoulder, when it comes to making sausages, I go limp with worry.

      Can you blame me? Look at all the places you can screw up, where your sausage can fail you utterly and leave you in tears.

      You grab some wonderful meat, hold it in your hands, appreciate its glory. Chill. You grind it, add some fat, and sprinkle some seasoning, whatever the flesh requires. Chill again. Slow down, contemplate the moon or something. You paddle that meat to bind it, melding flavor and texture seamlessly. Chill some more. What's your hurry? Toss a bit into a skillet, ask: are we ready? and adjust as needed. Stuff away. Then relax. If you can.

      I can't. You need to keep things cool to take care of your sausage, and it's challenging to stay cool when I'm all a-flutter about the prospect of a culminating, perfect, harmonious bind. If you read the books and you watch the shows, everyone acts just about as cool as a cucumber. But that's not real life with my sausage.

      It's a frenzy, I tell you. I know I should chill and relax, but I get all hot and bothered, start hurrying things along, unable to let the meat chill sufficiently, to take things slowly. Hell, I'm sweating now just thinking about it.

      I have to admit that I don't have this sausage problem when I'm alone in the house, have a couple of hours to kill, and know I won't be disturbed. I just settle in, take it nice and slow, not a care in the world, and everything comes out fine. But with someone else around, forget about it.

      Despite this mishegas, my wife is as supportive as she can be. She humors me patiently about these things, gently chiding, "Slow down! The house isn't on fire. It's just your sausage." Though I know she loves me despite my foibles, that sort of talk just adds fuel to that fire -- I mean, she can speak so glibly because it's not her sausage we're worrying about.

      Even if I am I able to relax, the prospect of sudden, precipitous sausage humiliation comes crashing down upon me. Think of it. All seems to be going so well -- a little too well. I'm keeping things cool, making sure that I'm taking it easy, following the plan step-by-step, trusting my instincts. I smile. I get cocky.

      And then, the frying pan hits the fire, and within moments I'm hanging my head: instead of forming a perfect bind, my sausage breaks and I break down. I want a firm, solid mass, and I'm watching a crumbly, limp link ooze liquid with embarrassing rapidity.

      Given my gender, in the past I've tried to subdue sausage anxiety with predictable contrivances: machines, science, and technique. If there's a tool or a book useful for perfecting my sausage, I've bought or coveted it. I calculate ratios of meat, salt, cure, sugar, and seasonings past the decimal; I measure out ingredients to the gram on digital scales; I poke instant-read thermometers into piles of seasoned meat; I take the grinder blade to my local knife sharpener to get the perfect edge. (We've already covered the stuffer above, of course.) I've got a full supply of dextrose, Bactoferm, and DQ curing salts numbers 1 and 2. The broken binding of my copy of Michael Ruhlman's Charcuterie has xeroxes and print-outs from eight other sources, and the pages are filled with crossed-out and recalculated recipes.

      It's the sort of thing that I used to do when I was younger: arm myself with all things known to mankind and blast ahead. It hasn't helped. I've learned the hard way that my hysterical masculine attempt to master all knowledge and technology has led, simply, to more panic and collapse.

      There is, I think, hope. I'm older, and my approach to my sausage has matured. I'm in less of a hurry, I roll with the challenges, and when the house is on fire, I just find a hydrant for my hose.

      If things collapse, well, I try to take the long view, recall the successes of my youth, and keep my head up. I mean, it's just my sausage.

      * * *

      Chris Amirault (aka, well, chrisamirault) is Director of Operations, eG Forums. He also runs a preschool and teaches in Providence, RI.
    • By Tara Middleton
      Alright so as of a few months ago, I decided to take an impromptu trip to Europe--mostly unplanned but with several priorities set in mind: find the best food and locate the most game-changing ice cream spots on the grounds of each city I sought out for. One of the greatest, most architecturally unique and divine cities I have visited thus far has gotta be Vienna, Austria. But what in the heck is there to eat over there?! (you might ask). 'Cause I sure as hell didn't know. So, I desperately reached out to a local Viennese friend of mine, who knows and understands my avid passion for all things edible, and she immediately shot back some must-have food dishes. Doing a bit of research beforehand, I knew I had to try the classic "Kasekreiner". Please forgive my German if I spelled that wrong. But no matter how you say it- say it with passion, because passion is just about all I felt when I ate it. Translated: it basically means cheese sausage. Honestly, what is there not to love about those two words. Even if that's not necessarily your go-to, do me a favor and give it a shot. Trust me, you won't regret it. A classic Austrian pork sausage with pockets of melty cheese, stuffed into a crisp French Baguette. No ketchup necessary (...and as an American, that's saying a lot). YUM. Best spot to try out this one-of-a-kind treat?! Bitzinger bei der Albertina – Würstelstand. Now here's a shot of me with my one true love in front of this classic Viennese green-domed building-- Karlskirche. Now, go check it.
       
       

    • By DanM
      One of the surprises from our move to Switzerland is the availability of kosher charcuterie. Sausages of all types, confit, mousse, rietttes, etc... One of the recent finds is this block of smoked beef. It has a nice fat layer in the middle. Any thoughts on how to use it? Should I slice it thin and then fry?
       
      Any thoughts would be appreciated.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...