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Chamber Vacuum Sealers, 2011–2014


roygon
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Congratulations! You're going to love it. I hope you also saved a bundle by deleting the printer.

Absolutely, it was a surprisingly significant portion of the cost for something that seems (to me) a bit frivolous.

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New video of the Polyscience 300 series chamber vac. I'd been looking at the VP 112 and VP 210, but when this was announced I thought I'd wait for it. It's a few months behind schedule, and I'm still waiting to read some first-person reviews... but it looks like it might be a winner!

Edited by btbyrd (log)
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I'm trying to understand both the functional difference, and life-expectancy of an oil-free pump vs an oil pump for a chamber vac.

Im looking for something durable, user friendly, and if an oil version is worth while, doing preventive maintenance on that pump at

home as sending these for servicing seem to be difficult to do.

I found this quote from a person at Amazon evaluating the VP210:

"" Researching the machine online, I read that this is dry rocker piston instead of the more expensive rotary oil motor. The dry rocker piston machine will tend to clog after sealing bags with alot of moisture in them (items like fish), but supposedly will still last 10 time longer than the typical countertop external strip sealing machine. The rotary oil motor machine will last 10 times longer than the dry rocker piston machine. However, I am using this on a home basis, not a commercial setting, so the representative said that the dry rocker piston would be fine. ""

your thoughts would be appreciated.

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The simple answer is that a dry pump is not capable of pulling a 99.9% vacuum. At best, you can expect to achieve 93-95% vacuum. This is still good, unless you want to compress watermelon. A dry pump is also prone to wear due to contamination from water vapor that comes from the food at low pressure. This is the reason you should never vacuum seal warm or hot foods. The oil pump will not have this wear because the oil absorbs the moisture and the pump continues to be well lubricated. Changing the oil is not a big deal but should be done at least once a year or more, depending upon usage.

I have a VP112 and it is fine for home use. I don't really need to crush watermelon so the lower vacuum level works fine for me. I doubt that there are many home users with oil type chamber sealers.

Edited by paulpegg (log)

Paul Eggermann

Vice President, Secretary and webmaster

Les Marmitons of New Jersey

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I chose an oil pump because as long as I was spending a bundle, I didn't mind spending a little more to get maximum flexibility. Since the oil pump is tolerant of water vapor I don't have to worry too much about what I put in the chamber. Being able to seal warm, watery leftovers, or vacuum-dry foods before frying is pretty handy.

I rarely need the higher vacuum level of the Busch pump but it's also nice to have.

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I had a problem w the pump on my Weston sealer. after 3 years of use though. but had to sent it back for repair which was a pain and total cost was about 150 $$

although i was very careful w water/warm foods it did get decent use over that time ( 1 1/2 freezer loads ) Id like to avoid that problem again if I can

http://www.webstaurantstore.com/ary-vacmaster-vp210-chamber-tabletop-vacuum-packaging-machine-10-seal-bar-110v/120VMASVP10.html

cost at the above for the 210, delivered no tax: 829

amazon for the identical or similar vacmaster:

http://www.amazon.com/VacMaster-VP210-Piston-Chamber-Vacuum/dp/B001Q3LSW4

$ 1,300 Amazon does not list the price for the 215

for the 215 at webstaurantstore is 889 so that 60 $ is just pump insurance.

many thanks for your insights.

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~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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well that's not bad. I even have that same 'power-screw-driver' very convenient.

:biggrin:

your ref has 3 units left. its shipped by truck and you take it off the truck.

how easy is this to 'hobble around with?"

many thanks

Edited by rotuts (log)
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I'd unbox/uncrate it in place and inspect for damage.

The VP215 weighs ~85 lbs. so eat some extra Wheaties! :biggrin:

~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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That's meaningless...there are dozens of "NEMA" plugs.

It should say a "Nema 5" plug which is the common 3 prong plug.

The machine is 110V, 60Hz, 4.2 Amps.

~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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The simple answer is that a dry pump is not capable of pulling a 99.9% vacuum. At best, you can expect to achieve 93-95% vacuum. This is still good, unless you want to compress watermelon.

I'm not sure that this is a limitation of dry piston pumps as such since the new Polyscience unit employs a dry pump but is apparently able to do vacuum compression. It might just be an issue with the VP-112. But since the Polyscience costs almost twice as much as the VP-112, it might not be worth the price difference unless you're looking to do a lot of pickling or melon-crushing.

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Well, I have searched and searched and cannot find a single place where PS states the actual vacuum level the can achieve in this box. At least the VP112 has a gauge that shows where you are. I think their marketing material leaves much to be desired. A 60 pound box with a dry pump? This is equivalent to the VP112. I doubt they can do to even 98% but of course, they aren't telling. Are they? For twice the money I would beware.

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Paul Eggermann

Vice President, Secretary and webmaster

Les Marmitons of New Jersey

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over time, if you are not careful moisture from even common meat and poultry might

damage a dry pump

on my Weston vac, after 3 years ( a long time ) I had to send it back for a pump replacement.

perhaps there pump came from " walmart "

( a joke ) at 3 years, 150 for the re-due, the oil pump in question would pay for itself in :

6 years + ?

and might be a bit of fun costly though and 85 lbs.

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might have a touch of " Ice Brain ". its 4 degrees you see ...

ordered the VP-215 the nice people at

https://olivia-hayse-r7le.squarespace.com/meat-packaging-vacuum/vacmaster-vp215

threw in the $ 40 for a lift gate so in 4 days it will be at my front door.

all I have to do it wrassle it inside over the door jam

after that, well .....

many thanks to all on the thread .

this is a bit cheaper than the BMW X3 my sister decided I needed.

Edited by rotuts (log)
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Congrats -- I think you will be super happy with it -- had a nice member here not had a mvs-31x for sale, I am certain I would have gone with the VP-215 -- seems like a great machine for the price.

I was going to get the 215 before I talked myself into the MVS-35. I think the 215 looks like a great value.

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I'm a more than happy owner of a VP-112. Here's where I bought mine - http://www.homebutcher.com/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=23. I purchased the scratch and dent mode lfor $499 shipping included just about a year ago and you would be hard pressed to find a flaw. It's listed as out of stock. I have seen it at other sites for around $650. It may not have all the bells and whistles but it is solid and does the job. A nice advantage of the 12-inch seal bar is you can seal two 6-inch bags at a time. Great for small portions and reduces wear and tear. It has the same motor as the VP-210 but can be used on a counter top with cabinets above. It is heavy, probably around 60# so you better have a dedicated place to park it. I have gone through 800-900 cycles to date and it has performed very well. The bags cost 3-4 cents which is 10x less than seal a meals so it can pay for itself with steady use. Does a great job on liquids with caveat do not start with the bag to full. Butcher Packer also has very good pricing on bags. At 30 second cycle it will pull 29.5 " hg.

How do you know you pulled 29.5 hg?

I'm told that's as high as any machine can go and it truly does this, then the VP-112 may be the machine for me. I'm hesitating because I want to make sure that whichever machine I buy gives me the option to not only seal but compress fruits, do brine infusions, etc

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How do you know you pulled 29.5 hg?

I'm told that's as high as any machine can go and it truly does this, then the VP-112 may be the machine for me. I'm hesitating because I want to make sure that whichever machine I buy gives me the option to not only seal but compress fruits, do brine infusions, etc

I've done compression of citrus fruits in my vp112, orange slices turned translucent, I haven't gotten around to doing vacuum infusions yet, but it's on the list ;)

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