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Chamber Vacuum Sealers, 2011–2014


roygon
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I'm not so sure about that.

1. The bar is quite heavy.

2 It raised with only -15 mm Hg in the chamber with the same speed and clamping action as at -28. and it stays up until the chamber has refilled with air. Also there is a significant spring holding the rods down. You have to get a good grip and pull hard to lift them. I doubt that -8 psi could do this. More likely is that these are magnetic plungers that are pushed up only if the lid is closed.

BTW, a few weeks ago someone suggested putting some vaseline on the gasket to help get a better seal around the lid. DON"T DO IT! I tried it and even a very thin layer caused the gasket to squirm under the lid as the vacuum level got to about -26 mm Hg and it got sucked into the chamber. What a job to clean that up! The best way to treat the gasket is to keep it and the groove it sits in clean and dry. It needs the friction in the groove to keep it from deforming and sliding around. lesson learned.

Paul Eggermann

Vice President, Secretary and webmaster

Les Marmitons of New Jersey

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Okay here's my two cents worth regarding the VP-112. I bought mine in March 2012 and have probably gone through ~1500 cycles. The amount of vacuum definitely has an effect on the quality of the seal. At high vacuums the standard seal time of 5-6 seconds is fine. If you decrease the vacuum below a 20 second cycle time I have to increase the seal time to 7-9 seconds. I usually insert the bag with about an inch past the seal bar. If I'm not sure about the seal I double the seal by decreasing the vacuum and increasing the seal time. Be careful to not overfill the bag as it will bunch resulting in a bad seal.

Regarding warm or hot food. Be prepared for a big mess in the chamber with liquids because the food in the pouch will boil like crazy regardless of machine. Been there done that, forgot that I'd been there and cleaned up the slop again. After two or three iterations I've learned my lesson.

The VP-112 has (or had) the same pump as the VP-110. The gauge on my machine reads to 30" Hg and my machine will hit 29.5". It is important to keep the gasket seal clean and free of dust, crumbs, ets. I use food grade silicone on the gasket. I have had no problem with fruit compression. Here's a few photo's from 2012 with my first try with watermelon.

DSC_6314_1077.JPG

DSC_6315_1078.JPG

DSC_6453_1231.JPG

The company has replaced two lids that developed stress fractures. They replaced them with no questions and included 2nd day shipping. I assume they were aware of a manufacturing\design defect and took care of the problem.

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FYI. The bar is vacuum operated. I spoke with a tech about it a couple years back. Also, the gauges are trash, and get even worse with all the vibration. That was back in 2012, so maybe they use better gauges now.

Edited by lordratner (log)
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FYI. The bar is vacuum operated. I spoke with a tech about it a couple years back. Also, the gauges are trash, and get even worse with all the vibration. That was back in 2012, so maybe they use better gauges now.

All the vibration? Trash gauges? What unit are you referencing? My Ary unit does not vibrate to the degree that there is any bounce in the needle. The vacuum observed is also consistent with the vacuum required to compress fruit and "boil" like crazy warm food or liquids.

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FYI. The bar is vacuum operated. I spoke with a tech about it a couple years back. Also, the gauges are trash, and get even worse with all the vibration. That was back in 2012, so maybe they use better gauges now.

All the vibration? Trash gauges? What unit are you referencing? My Ary unit does not vibrate to the degree that there is any bounce in the needle. The vacuum observed is also consistent with the vacuum required to compress fruit and "boil" like crazy warm food or liquids.

VP112. Like I said, this was a couple years back, so they may have switched to a better gauge. This was from the service tech, who was helping me troubleshoot a broken unit.
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I contacted Polyscience to ask about their 300 series chamber vac and they report that the pump can achieve 0mbar or a 100% vacuum. That's about as strong as it gets.

I also contacted ARY Vacmaster about the VP-112 and they responded that their quality control tests to make sure that the machine can pull at least 10 Torr, or about 13.33 mbar. This is strong enough to achieve compression and flash pickling (as fellow eGulleter's have testified). I read on ChefSteps that the crucial factor for compression is that you can get below 20mbar.

I was sold on the Polyscience unit when it was first announced, but now that I'm almost ready to buy I realize that there's no way I can fit it into my kitchen; it's about 30 inches tall with the lid open, so unless it sits out on a table I won't be able to fit it anywhere. It also costs twice as much as the VP112 and still isn't available in the US (though it's probably going to be available widely in the next few weeks). So I've been eyeing the Vacmaster pretty hard. It's also going to be hard to squeeze into my space, but it should fit. It's got a larger footprint but isn't nearly as tall.

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another issue with all Vac's is this:

is the pump a 'dry' pump or an oiled pump ?

this is something that might be important to future repairs. re: moisture with a dry pump and an oil change with an oil pump or a

new pump w a dry pump that has accumulated moisture.

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So I've been eyeing the Vacmaster pretty hard. It's also going to be hard to squeeze into my space, but it should fit. It's got a larger footprint but isn't nearly as tall.

I've been quite happy with mine so far. just wish I'd bought a case of the 10x13 bags in the first place, since I seem to be using more of them than the others.

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another issue with all Vac's is this:

is the pump a 'dry' pump or an oiled pump ?

this is something that might be important to future repairs. re: moisture with a dry pump and an oil change with an oil pump or a

new pump w a dry pump that has accumulated moisture.

From

It's a dry pump

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Interesting video on the Polyscience -- I am super curious to see what the first comsumer on here has to say about it. I had a strange (I am calling it weather related) phenomenon with my Minipack recently -- It was showing 99.9% vacuum but was clearly not getting there. It was probably sealing in the 92-95 range based on previous settings. It was also super cold in the basement where I have the machine hooked up. Once the weather slightly broke, it was back to normal. Colder temperatures are the only variable I could come up with.

Overall, the Polyscience machine looks nice -- it is too bad there isn't any sort of gauge to determine the level of vacuum, but, as discussed above, who knows if those are even accurate. Being a person who seals tons of "wet stuff" I would be concerned with the statement of "maintenance free" -- has anyone had any experience with the dry pump getting jammed up with moisture? I know with an oil pump, you can always change the oil and pretty much solve the moisture issue. It does look like a nice machine for sure though.

Edited by Unpopular Poet (log)
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Chamber Vacs with Oil Pump start at about 2k don't they... thus the lovely question... If it's a 1k machine and it's a dry pump... how long before it was a better choice to spend 2k?

Edited by Raamo (log)
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Chamber vacs with an oil pump start at about $869.00 with "free" shipping.

~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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Chamber vacs with an oil pump start at about $869.00 with "free" shipping.

Vacmaster vp215 and it's ilk? it's 86 lbs. I guess that's the only down side (if you have a home for it that doesn't require movement it seems like a fine one, and rotuts bought one)

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