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Food neuroses that drive you nuts


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What is Minute Rice? I mean, I KNOW that it comes in a box because I've seen it in food stores, but, is it rice? Or, is it some processed thing made with rice? I'm envisioning that they take rice and pulverize it and add 'flavorings' and then reform THAT into rice shaped bits.

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Minute Rice is cooked, freeze-dried rice which one reconstitutes with water. It bears roughly the same resemblance to rice as Tang does to orange juice.

"There is nothing like a good tomato sandwich now and then."

-Harriet M. Welsch

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ok someone bugged me badly and since it was so long ago I almost forgot!

I was married for about an hour right out of school to this guy would only eat food that had no seasonings other than morton salt and preground pepper...over cooked dried out meat and mushy vegetables..mashed or baked potatoes were the only option for starch (God forbid I cook a pot of rice!) ....

Damn!!! What a twerp! And you lasted a whole hour??

the sex was good

but with out food what is the point? and after an hour I wanted something to eat

I've said it before and I'll say it again: if you're dating someone, and you want to know how well a marriage would work between the two of you, food and eating habits are an extremely strong indicator. A person's willingness to try new things, to adapt, and several other traits and skills, all show in eating habits.

However, if you find someone who shares your own approach to food, but has other habits or dispositions you find intolerable or annoying, don't let the food thing fool you. A sign is a sign.

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Attention! Attention!

I've just been informed that my boyfriend will NOT eat ribs! I repeat, he will NOT eat ribs!

:shock:

...apparently there's something unnerving and nauseating to him about the rib cage... :huh:

"I know it's the bugs, that's what cheese is. Gone off milk with bugs and mould - that's why it tastes so good. Cows and bugs together have a good deal going down."

- Gareth Blackstock (Lenny Henry), Chef!

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Attention! Attention!

I've just been informed that my boyfriend will NOT eat ribs! I repeat, he will NOT eat ribs!

:shock:

...apparently there's something unnerving and nauseating to him about the rib cage...  :huh:

:shock: Oh well, more ribs for the rest of us.

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My sister will dissect meat to remove every visible speck of fat.  She looks like a surgeon in the OR.

My brother does this too. He also likes to mush all his food together and only eats ice cream after he stirs it to a near soup like consistency. We are talking about an adult here. Drives me nuts

I had a roommate who would nuke her ice cream, in the carton, because she didn't like it if it was too hard to scoop...

Needless to say, we never shared ice cream cartons.

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I've heard from a ton of people that they avoid red velvet cake because of food coloring (and thus chemicals). I totally agree that food coloring probably isn't the best thing for you, but for > 90% of us I'm sure we consume FAR more chemicals (and food coloring) through non-red-velvet-cake avenues than through the occasional slice.

Almost everything that irks me is this kind of lose of perspective. Another example: people who won't eat rich dough baked goods because of the butter but will spread an opaque layer of butter or cream-cheese on a bagel

My husband has a co-worker who won't eat red velvet cake because the version they got at work once, from Fox and Obel's was colored with beet juice.

The food coloring is fine, but beet juice is where she draws the line.... :hmmm:

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One of my closest friends claims to be "allergic" to onions. And yet, she consumes them with regularity in restaurants and at home (they're cooked into her food and she doesn't know they are there). She also claims to be allergic to tomatoes, yet just two nights ago ate double helpings of bolognese sauce - appearantly the addition of Italian sausage "balanced out" the tomato factor. -insert eye roll here-

She's one of those people that can not be allowed into the kitchen while others are cooking because if she sees anying she thinks she doesn't like, she will not eat any of the food at all, and will end up bringing take out from somewhere. It's infuriating. She refuses to try anything unusual or outside her norm. One time, a whole large group of us were meeting for dinner at a Thai restaurant. This place is well known in the community, most people who eat there love it, and they have lots of things on the menu to appeal to American unadventurous eaters while also pleasing the more refined palates. And yet, on the car ride there, she would not stop with the pouting. When asked what was wrong, the conversation went like this:

Picky McPickerson: "I know I'm not going to like the food there. I'm hungry and I want something I like!"

Me: "But you've never been there."

Picky: "But I won't like it!"

Me: "Have you ever tried Thai food?"

Picky: "No! Because I know I won't like it!"

Me: "I bet they'll make you something fried with something sweet and corn starchy glopped all over it if you ask."

Picky: "But it's not Jade Palace (local crap HORRIBLE Chinese American joint) and I know I won't like it!"

Me: -irritated silence-

She's a grown woman in her thirties with a career and a car and a stable living environment and yet she eats like a four-year-old. A four-year-old who is indulged and pampered by over-indulgent parents and allowed to eat nothing but macarroni and cheese and grilled cheese sandwiches. It's an extreme neurosis, and it makes me (and just about everyone else who knows her) absolutely butt-crazy insane. Otherwise, she is a perfectly lovely person for whom I would do just about anything but her food ticks really irk. To be fair, I will admit we have had some headway in recent years - she will now eat some vegetables but only mushrooms, canned green beans (ew!), and lettuce. The only acceptable salad dressing is Ranch.

-Sounds awfully rich!

-It is! That's why I serve it with ice cream to cut the sweetness!

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Minute Rice is cooked, freeze-dried rice which one reconstitutes with water.  It bears roughly the same resemblance to rice as Tang does to orange juice.

Wow, you just add water you have rice? That sounds kind of space age and, um, interesting. Maybe we'll try it some day for the fun factor.

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Minute Rice is cooked, freeze-dried rice which one reconstitutes with water.  It bears roughly the same resemblance to rice as Tang does to orange juice.

Wow, you just add water you have rice? That sounds kind of space age and, um, interesting. Maybe we'll try it some day for the fun factor.

Well, it's not quite that easy, you do have to nuke it for two minutes then let it rest for 5 minutes.

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Minute Rice is cooked, freeze-dried rice which one reconstitutes with water.  It bears roughly the same resemblance to rice as Tang does to orange juice.

Wow, you just add water you have rice? That sounds kind of space age and, um, interesting. Maybe we'll try it some day for the fun factor.

Well, it's not quite that easy, you do have to nuke it for two minutes then let it rest for 5 minutes.

The worst thing about Minute rice is that I am going to have to start using it again for "grandma's stuffing"....I have tried every other rice available to me and the stuffing doesnt taste "right"

It actually smells better than Uncle Ben's

tracey

The great thing about barbeque is that when you get hungry 3 hours later....you can lick your fingers

Maxine

Avoid cutting yourself while slicing vegetables by getting someone else to hold them while you chop away.

"It is the government's fault, they've eaten everything."

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My hair coloriste is a young woman who actually cooks, and we chat about food every six weeks when I put myself in her brilliant hands and say: "You are the Holbein of hair. Do whatever you want."

Jennifer has told me that she's "picky." She's also seven months pregnant. I told her about a watermelon/tomato sorbet a friend made, and she turned paper white and retched into the (handy) sink. All us ladies with foil on our heads gasped.

She returned to me and my head. "I'm so sorry. But I detest any member of the melon family and raw tomatoes mystify me -- so slimy. The thought of eating either of them makes me shudder, even when I'm not pregnant. What kind of sicko would deliberately put them together?"

Um, a good cook I know.

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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I brought a tiny espresso maker home to my father's house at Christmas so that I could have my fix. The first day, he watched me make it, asked what it was, shuddered, and refused to taste it. Day two: his ancient coffee maker had finally broken the night before, my sister-in-law made coffee in a pan on the stove. No coffee in the morning, Christmas eve, I'm sipping my espresso out of a regular coffee cup.

"It's mean to drink coffee in front of a person."

"You told me you didn't want any. Do you want me to make you some?"

"No."

Then there's a cousin of mine who is over fifty years old, still lives with his still living and still married parents and will not eat anything with seeds in it.

My nephew, as a small child, would not eat bread. Yep, bread.

I like to bake nice things. And then I eat them. Then I can bake some more.

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there are some I do not care for and avoid them if possible but try to be discrete about it if they are served to me.

God bless you! This, I think, is the worst food faux pas if not neurosis -- having to freeking tell everyone at the table what you don't like and why and blah blah blah. Boring, rude and immature (can you tell this really fires me up?) My husband is a great, creative cook, but both his mom and sister have so many won't-eats, and are so willing to tell you all about them, it's truly embarassing. It's one thing to decide after a few experiences that you're not fond of something. It's another to not even try it (sister-in-law and her husband), or turn down an otherwise delightful dish because you don't like one ingredient. My MIL once exclaimed about the delicious looking, wonderful smelling dessert we were serving, then announced, "Well, I won't like it -- it has raisins." Please.

I prefer meat without bones, but wouldn't miss a meal over it :biggrin: I think it's because it's often hard to get off the bone, and sometimes has not gotten hot enough to get sufficiently cooked near the bone. Especially chicken.

Amy in Michigan
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I brought a tiny espresso maker home to my father's house at Christmas so that I could have my fix.  The first day, he watched me make it, asked what it was, shuddered, and refused to taste it.  Day two:  his ancient coffee maker had finally broken the night before, my sister-in-law made coffee in a pan on the stove.  No coffee in the morning, Christmas eve, I'm sipping my espresso out of a regular coffee cup.

"It's mean to drink coffee in front of a person."

"You told me you didn't want any.  Do you want me to make you some?"

"No."

Wait a second.....

You're telling me that your father will drink regular brewed coffee, but not espresso, and he chastised you for drinking it in front of him when there was no brewed coffee in the house?

Thats just plain rude and picky.

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...I can't bear to use food colouring in cooking at all, even though I do know that it isn't that bad for you and also it's not like I avoid it in prepackaged foods and drinks.

I have one that drives myself nuts- I must eat m&ms two at a time, and they have to be the same color.  Then when you are at the end of one color and you only have one left of that color, you have to decide whether to eat it by itself, or mix it with another color.... I've tried to stop myself, and the only good strategy is not eating m&ms at all.

[

Apparently there are two of us in the world who do this! ............

And only with the plain M&M's, not the peanut.

Good Lord, I didn't know this was classified as nuts :shock: But, I just realized I do the same thing with Skittles....except it has to be two different colors UNLESS it's the purple ones. The purple ones go in two at a time :unsure: I'm not going to sleep tonight worrying about this.......

I only eat 'broken' chips, pretzels, animal crackers or any packaged item in that vein.  I will also eat curled/folded potoato chips.  I  adore the texture of curled/folded potato chips. As for the 'broken' chips and things, well, I feel sorry for them. Yes, you read that correctly, I.FEEL.SORRY.FOR.THEM.

I know, it's crazy, I know! I just can't help it.

And Good-n-Plenties...  Must eat them two at a time, never mixing the pink and the white...   :biggrin:   And Smarties (the American kind--I think the Brits have a completely different idea of what these are)...  I open a package, arrange them in groups by color, then in a "pyramid" from most to least, throw away the orange ones (which taste like baby aspirin), and eat the color with the largest quantity first, working my way through to the color with only one representative...  Unlike May, I'm pretty sure I need help.   :unsure:

On the other hand, Necco wafers can only be eaten one at a time.

On the other hand, Necco wafers can only be eaten one at a time.

After crinkling open the packet and taking out the black ones. And tossing the two on each side that might have touched. There's just something transferrable about that dusty powder that conveys the licorice taste to its neighbors.

And I LOVE fennel and basil and anise stars in stuff---just no black lickrish.

I think there is the invitation list to a perfectly delightful party here.

Easter's coming - may I invite y'all over?

We can display our oddities, laugh at each other & ourselves, and secretly cringe when forced to watch someone who's ticks dont conform to our own.

When I eat M&M's or Skittles (or any multicolored candy for that matter) I group them in rainbows and eat each rainbow in ROY G BIV order. It brings new meaning to "tasting the rainbow" from the skittles commercial.

WHile we are confessing our "issues" I might as well add my others :wacko: :

I won't eat even a hint of runny white in my eggs (that gets scraped aside and my dog gets it at the end - I do like my yolks runny though!

Also - I won't eat pancakes unless they are neatly stacked, cut into eight wedges (after buttering each one) then pouring syrup on them. I eat from one stack at a time going counter clockwise - it's my mom's fault though - that's the only way I know how to eat them.

My husband dissects burrito's like he is a surgeon, studying the top and making a very precise incision on the top, then turing it into a square window and proceeding outward - it's very weird!

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I'm gonna open up a new territory here: Eating to *provoke* neuroses.

It's a Shibboleth in every EMS system I've worked or volunteered in across the country: After working a particularly wretched and gory scene, inevitably the crews go out for a meal together.........and *somebody* in the group will order scambled eggs and put ketchup on them.

It's a test.

The people who won't eat meat with a bone in it because it reminds them of the origins........would never be happy in a VFD.

I'm a canning clean freak because there's no sorry large enough to cover the, "Oops! I gave you botulism" regrets.

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hah... I guess my neuroses would be:

1) Blue food. Food is not blue. If it is blue, it is not food (I'm not talking blueberry-blue, I mean blue-popsicle blue, or anything close).

2) I can't watch people eat mayonnaise. SO gross. *note: i have no problem eating it myself.

3) I've been getting better, but I've ALWAYS and still do have problems eating soup that other people made. Between my love of classic english murder mysteries, and my Uncle teasing me about eyeballs sneaking their way into soup, I always hear the voice in the back of my head going "...you don't know what they could've slipped in there!!"

Torren O'Haire - Private Chef, FMSC Tablemaster, Culinary Scholar

"life is a combination of magic and pasta"

-F. Fellini

"We should never lose sight of a beautifully conceived meal."

-J. Child

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We went out to dinner the other night with some relatives and close friends, and it was quite the enlightening experience.

First off, I rediscovered a quirk of my own that seldom rears its head, but is impossible to ignore when it does. I. Can't. Mix. Pasta. (or most starches, besides bread, but mixing pasta shapes is the worst) There can NOT be two kinds of noodles on my plate, period. It makes me extremely uncomfortable.

A piece of penne bounced off my friend's plate, when the waitress set it down, and it had a piece of spaghetti threaded through it, by some freak occurance. It sat close to the rim of my plate for the duration of my meal, and it really bothered me. I kept trying to subtly move it, or cover it, without making a scene, but it stayed right there, just taunting me. My husband noticed my silent distress, and picked the thing up and dropped it in my plate of fettucini, and I lost my appetite. I have no idea what it is, or why, but mixing pastas really affects me.

I also can't eat potatoes and rice together on the same plate, or noodles and rice (pilaf, gross!), and some people like mixing different kinds of cereal in the same bowl, and it just sends shivers down my spine. I kinda forgot about that till the whole penne/spaghetti incident.

The second thing that was genuinely entertaining, was trying to watch my food neurotic friends sit across from each other and try to function. One of them was the typical "no food touching, one thing at a time" kind, where he seperated everything on his plate, and ate it clockwise, till he finished with his entree. The other friend was the one that I mentioned upthread that has to eat everything in exact proportions, one bite at a time, equally. Sometimes, to make it happen, he has to shove two bites of different things in his mouth. Watching them kinda stare at each other, and look uncomfortable was well worth my pasta ordeal.

:blink::rolleyes::wub:

Edited by Lilija (log)
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1) Blue food. Food is not blue. If it is blue, it is not food (I'm not talking blueberry-blue, I mean blue-popsicle blue, or anything close).

I won't eat blue things either. I don't count blueberries, because when they are in a baked good, you can see that they are really kind of purple.

I think it's true that blue is not so much a color that food occurs naturally in, so I balk at eating it, despite the fact that I am sure I eat food that's artificially colored in some manner all the time. Mentally I cannot deal with blue. And I especially hate things like "blue raspberry" flavor. There's no such thing as a blue raspberry! It's not nature's fault that so many good foods are shades of red.

I also have the thing where I have to balance out what I eat, so that I finish everything at the same time, but I'm not compulsive about it. I can easily shrug it off it it's not going to happen. In addition, I try to save the best bite for last. (PS - to the other person who said this, but worried about eating too much, you can solve this by just eating the best bite once you start to feel full and stop there).

Until it was pointed out to me, I used to always leave something on my plate. I never completely cleaned off my plate. I never noticed it, and no one else did either because I have a small appetite and rarely finish a meal unless I prepare and plate it for myself. But a German friend who stayed with us for a summer pointed out that I NEVER cleaned my plate. Even if I ate almost everything, I would always leave one small piece behind. As soon as she pointed it out, I started paying attention and noticed it was true. Once I noticed I was doing it, I stopped. But I have no idea where that came from.

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I was shopping with my mother the other day and, on the way home, she said, "Oh, I forgot to buy eggs."

"No problem," said I. "I bought two dozen. You can have one of them."

She replied, "But I don't like the brown ones."

No amount of evidence was going to convince her that white- and brown-shelled eggs taste exactly the same. I knew not to bother. She'd rather make a whole 'nother trip to the store than eat a brown egg.

I'm sure we've all encountered maddening food neuroses like this. Please do share.

I still think your example is the best. :biggrin: They're exactly the SAME!!!!

At the age of six I wanted to be a cook. At seven I wanted to be Napoleon. And my ambition has been growing steadily ever since. ‐ Salvador Dali

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Until it was pointed out to me, I used to always leave something on my plate. I never completely cleaned off my plate. I never noticed it, and no one else did either because I have a small appetite and rarely finish a meal unless I prepare and plate it for myself. But a German friend who stayed with us for a summer pointed out that I NEVER cleaned my plate. Even if I ate almost everything, I would always leave one small piece behind. As soon as she pointed it out, I started paying attention and noticed it was true. Once I noticed I was doing it, I stopped. But I have no idea where that came from.

It used to be considered ill-mannered to clean one's plate (too piggish?), and proper to leave a bit of food, even if only one bite. This could come in handy if there was something on your plate you didn't like: you could leave a goodly portion of it and it would be taken as good manners.

That custom must have been dropped a long time ago, I'd forgotten all about it.

Ruth Dondanville aka "ruthcooks"

“Are you making a statement, or are you making dinner?” Mario Batali

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Until it was pointed out to me, I used to always leave something on my plate. I never completely cleaned off my plate. I never noticed it, and no one else did either because I have a small appetite and rarely finish a meal unless I prepare and plate it for myself. But a German friend who stayed with us for a summer pointed out that I NEVER cleaned my plate. Even if I ate almost everything, I would always leave one small piece behind. As soon as she pointed it out, I started paying attention and noticed it was true. Once I noticed I was doing it, I stopped. But I have no idea where that came from.

It used to be considered ill-mannered to clean one's plate (too piggish?), and proper to leave a bit of food, even if only one bite. This could come in handy if there was something on your plate you didn't like: you could leave a goodly portion of it and it would be taken as good manners.

That custom must have been dropped a long time ago, I'd forgotten all about it.

I think in many Asian cultures you should leave something. It shows the host that they have provided enough food and you are satisfied. Sometimes if you clean your plate they will continue to put food on your plate for you! I've seen some people who come from the "clean your plate" culture get in big trouble because of that sometimes unknown cultural practice. They kept eating and the host kept on feeding! Hahaha!

I think hospitality is very linked to face in Asian cultures and you lose face if someone thinks you are er... the Thai word is kee ngok and for the life of me I cant think of the english equivalent. Maybe stingy? Our family always seemed to have enough food to feed an army. EVERY night. I wonder if thats why we generally had leftovers for breakfast... hrm. I always felt sorry for our cook cause she had to get up at some obscene hour to make food for alms for the monks, our breakfasts, and then go to the market for that nights dinner. Often before 7am.

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Two come to my mind, though only one's a neurosis; the other's an oddity.

I too had a friend (who used to eat my cooking regularly) who would cry if the foods on his plate touched or "co-mingled".  Sadly for him, my idea of a meal is a main course with many complementary sides, served on what I call dinner plates though others call serving platters, and by design, things co-mingle.  One particularly successful night I served a pork roast with 5 sides, and his wife exclaimed "wow - not only does each side go with the roast, they go with each other no matter what combination you take!" 

He wept.

The second one is my partner, who when I met him ate like a picky child.  No fish, no shellfish, no organ meats, nothing you touch with  your hands, etc.  With time, all that changed.  Now his favorite foods, aside from as much foie gras as he can get, are things like duck thighs (i.e. confit) and braised or confit thighs of pigeon, pheasant, etc.  Yet when we go to the Thanksgiving meal, he still takes only white meat turkey.  It boggles the mind.  Of course, it means I don't have to fight him for the legs or share one, but I find it mind boggling.

Out of curiosity, how old was this person?

At the age of six I wanted to be a cook. At seven I wanted to be Napoleon. And my ambition has been growing steadily ever since. ‐ Salvador Dali

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Two come to my mind, though only one's a neurosis; the other's an oddity.

I too had a friend (who used to eat my cooking regularly) who would cry if the foods on his plate touched or "co-mingled".  Sadly for him, my idea of a meal is a main course with many complementary sides, served on what I call dinner plates though others call serving platters, and by design, things co-mingle.  One particularly successful night I served a pork roast with 5 sides, and his wife exclaimed "wow - not only does each side go with the roast, they go with each other no matter what combination you take!" 

He wept.

The second one is my partner, who when I met him ate like a picky child.  No fish, no shellfish, no organ meats, nothing you touch with  your hands, etc.  With time, all that changed.  Now his favorite foods, aside from as much foie gras as he can get, are things like duck thighs (i.e. confit) and braised or confit thighs of pigeon, pheasant, etc.  Yet when we go to the Thanksgiving meal, he still takes only white meat turkey.  It boggles the mind.  Of course, it means I don't have to fight him for the legs or share one, but I find it mind boggling.

Out of curiosity, how old was this person?

The guy who wept was about 21 or 22; he had been eating my cooking (with food touching) for about 4 or 5 years.

Overheard at the Zabar’s prepared food counter in the 1970’s:

Woman (noticing a large bowl of cut fruit): “How much is the fruit salad?”

Counterman: “Three-ninety-eight a pound.”

Woman (incredulous, and loud): “THREE-NINETY EIGHT A POUND ????”

Counterman: “Who’s going to sit and cut fruit all day, lady… YOU?”

Newly updated: my online food photo extravaganza; cook-in/eat-out and photos from the 70's

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