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renam

Fondant for Confections

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I have a question. I made Peter Grewlings fondant over the holidays and it's a really good reciepe. I had not problem making it. I did separate it to make different flavors. I used the mint extract for one flavor and the powdered raspberry from Sweet celebration for the other flavor. Once I put them in the mold and tasted one it was good. Good flavor for both batche's. But as time went on it seemed to lose the potency of the flavor. Is there something I missed or did wrong? I added the flavor after it 'ripened' overnight. Then I re-heated it and added the flavors.

Thanks in advance :smile:

Rena

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I have a question.  I made Peter Grewlings fondant over the holidays and it's a really good reciepe.  I had not problem making it.  I did separate it to make different flavors.  I used the mint extract for one flavor and the powdered raspberry from Sweet celebration for the other flavor.  Once I put them in the mold and tasted one it was good.  Good flavor for both batche's.  But as time went on it seemed to lose the potency of the flavor.  Is there something I missed or did wrong?  I added the flavor after it 'ripened' overnight. Then I re-heated it and added the flavors.

Thanks in advance :smile:

Rena

I've noticed the same thing. Creams tend to lose flavour over time. Probably best to over flavour when you make them so they will retain potency for a longer time. I find mint oil last longer than extract.

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Thanks Kerry,

I acutually added frest mint leaves the first time I made fondant but I had to put it thru a strainer because the chopped leaves were to big and I was worried that it would spoil. So I strained it (very labor intensive) and I was left with little speckles of green which was perfect. I'm not sure if I want to go thru that again with the straining. You mentioned Mint Oil where did you order it from?

Thanks,

Rena

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Thanks Kerry,

I acutually added frest mint leaves the first time I made fondant but I had to put it thru a strainer because the chopped leaves were to big and I was worried that it would spoil.  So I strained it (very labor intensive) and I was left with little speckles of green which was perfect.  I'm not sure if I want to go thru that again with the straining.  You mentioned Mint Oil where did you order it from?

Thanks,

Rena

I buy my mint oil from Xenex labs. It's quite often available in pharmacies and bulk stores I think. If you are in the US look up Anatolian Treasures on Google. They carry it as well as a lot of other fabulous oils. They are wonderful to deal with and they send you sample of other oils when you put in an order, which gives you a chance to try all sorts of things risk free. I highly recommend the black pepper oil A few drops of that with some oil of bergemot makes a wonderful combination.

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I've been having trouble getting my confectionery fondant to properly crystallize. I'm using the Greweling recipe (by weight: 1 part water, 1 part glucose syrup, 5 parts sugar; cook to ~240F, agitate when it cools to 120F).

When I begin agitating it on my marble slab with my scraper, it quickly becomes very sticky and viscous - nearly impossible to work with. After about 15 minutes, it becomes opaque white, but it remains a sticky, very viscous mass, much like saltwater taffy but denser. Even when I continue to agitate it for an additional 20 minutes, it never seems to reach the short, crumbly texture that it's supposed to. Even leaving it to ripen overnight in an airtight container overnight makes no difference. I've tried 4 or 5 times now, and the same thing happens each time.

As an experiment, I left some exposed overnight and, by the next morning, it was the proper texture: it would hold together, but it wasn't sticky at all, and it was slightly crumbly around the edges when molded.

The pictures of the agitation process in Greweling's book seem to show a much thinner syrup that looks easier to work with. The last picture shows a short-textured white mass that looks like a white frosting. I've done some research online, but I haven't found any helpful information.


Edited by Nimbok (log)

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This is a handy link as well for fondant

http://www.eddyvandammeusa.com/2010/02/fondant/

I haven't tried the Greweling recipe. When I have made fondant in the past, the agitation process has taken a good 20+ minutes of hard agitation - you really do work your arms. The link above uses a high powered food processor to do the agitation (if you have one). I have also done the agitation step in a kitchen aid with the paddle attachment (after a little working manually first).

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I can barely scrape the syrup from the marble slab. There is absolutely no way my food processor could handle it. I just can't figure out why mine seems to be so much thicker - I'm positive that I'm only cooking it to 240F and using the correct ratio of ingredients.

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Have you checked the thermometer recently?? That's all I could think of. Or, if you're quartering a batch, it might be cooling too quickly on the marble.

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have you ever made fondant before?

Me?? Yep, many times before. That said I'm in the middle of moving house and don't have any of my recipe books at the moment.


Edited by gap (log)

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Have you checked the thermometer recently?? That's all I could think of. Or, if you're quartering a batch, it might be cooling too quickly on the marble.

I use the thermometer all the time for tempering chocolate, so I'm sure it's still accurate. The smaller batch size may be the issue. I am making about 1/3 the recipe in the book - I'm using 300g sugar, 60g water/glucose. The recipe in the book is for a batch using 1kg sugar.

I have not made fondant before, but I am comparing mine to photos in Greweling's book and on websites (http://sum.ptuo.us/roller/ks/entry/how_to_make_fondant), and it's clear that mine is far too viscous. If I pulled the scraper back in the manner shown in those photos, it would barely scratch the surface of the fondant. Also, it would be impossible for me to use the scraper in those photos as I couldn't get enough leverage without a handle.


Edited by Nimbok (log)

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Even chef Greweling hates making fondant, I think he dreads it actually. Making fondant takes an immense amount of force, you really have to work the sugar to hell and back. I doubt you are having abnormal difficulties, not many (and when I mean not many I mean I still have yet to meet a single person) people make their own fondant. The stuff you can buy in the pails is very well made fondant. I recommend skipping the task, its too intense.

-And I have made my own fondant a few times before (very small batches)

-And I have been with Peter Greweling while he made fondant.

-And no gap, I wasn't asking you that question.

Also, in case you just want to do so you know you can, do a smaller batch and work with it fast. Your room may be too cold?


Dean Anthony Anderson

"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This

Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

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PROBLEM SOLVED!

P235 of the book (Greweling) says to combine the sugar, glucose syrup, and water in the saucepan at the start. This is what I had been doing. However, on p221, it says to add the glucose syrup only once the sugar and water reach a boil. I tried doing this instead, and the syrup was much, much thinner and easier to work with. Before, it was impossible to agitate - almost the consistency of hard candy during pulling, yet even stickier.

In short, don't add the glucose syrup until the sugar/water mixture reaches a boil!


Edited by Nimbok (log)

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I'm planning on making some chocolate covered cherries for my Dad. For starters, I need to make some fondant.

I've been looking at Peter Greweling's Chocolates and Confections and Chocolates and Confections at Home as my reference.

In Chocolates and Confections, he specifies tabling the fondant and agitating it with a scraper after cooking.

In Chocolates and Confections at Home, he suggests that you pour the heated syrup in the bowl of your mixer and beat it with a paddle attachment.

Is one of these methods preferable to the other in terms of the finished product? Is it just the scale of the two recipe in Chocolates and Confections (which makes 53 oz of fondant) makes it impractical to use the mixer?


Edited by YWalker (log)

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I dont think it has such a big impact on the product, its a matter of whats more accessible to the person making candy at home. Most people are going to have a mixer rather then a marble slab, so its just a way to make the same recipe that more people will be able to do practically at home.

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Using the mixer will result it a slightly grainier fondant, but in cordials, it will dissolve anyway, so doesn't really matter.


Ruth Kendrick

Chocolot
Artisan Chocolates and Toffees
www.chocolot.com

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Thanks very much for the perspective. I was just wondering "What sane person would rather spend 20 minutes wrestling it into submission, when the nice KitchenAid mixer will do that for you?" However, as Chocolot noted, since it's all going to dissolve anyway, it looks like I can go ahead and take the easy way out.


Edited by YWalker (log)

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I personally still like the idea of using a slab, I just think its cool to make candy the way they did it 60 years ago.

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I personally still like the idea of using a slab, I just think its cool to make candy the way they did it 60 years ago.

I totally agree - the first time I do it - after that I always try to find a less work intensive way - cause I'm essentially lazy!

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Someone told me I could use a food processor to make fondant, pouring the hot liquid into the bowl of the processor and then waiting for it to cool down to a specific temp (which I've forgotten) and then turn on the blade of the processor. It sounded like it would work, in theory. In reality, I burned up my wife's food processor. I know, I know, I need a Thermomix....

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I made my first batch on the slab, then saved a bit and used it to seed my mixer batch. I did have to finish the mixer batch on the slab though as it never seemed to set up quite as well as the first, slabbed batch.

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I personally still like the idea of using a slab, I just think its cool to make candy the way they did it 60 years ago.

I also agree that working it on the slab is my preferred method. Though I do remember it seemed much easier to muscle in culinary school then when I did it last winter...guess I better spend more time at the gym!

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I've made fondant using the recipe in Greweling at Home countless times with no problems. I cooked the sugar to 236F as per the recipe, but while mixing the fondant, it turned very dry and crumbly. I let it mature overnight before trying to make thin patties. When I tried to melt the fondant for thin patties it was very difficult to melt. It didn't start to melt until about 140F and at 170F was still way too thick to use. I couldn't push the temperature any higher since I wanted to add invertase.

Any ideas as to what happened to my fondant?

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You can add additional liquid at 160 f. Try thinning it out at that temp to a pourable consistency, and check the texture after they set up.

Sent from my DROID X2 using Tapatalk 2

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