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The Parson's Wife

Baking with Peter Reinhart's Whole Grain Book

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Just wondering if anyone is using this book yet? Any news about this new book? I have one on order and look forward to using new formulas.

Blessings on your Baking! Shawn <><

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Just wondering if anyone is using this book yet?  Any news about this new book?  I have one on order and look forward to using new formulas. 

Blessings on your Baking! Shawn <><

I know that Chapter's Book Store in Canada shows that it is not yet released - appears to be being released October timeframe. I too am awaiting my copy. I have enjoyed and had excellent success with Peter Reinhart's other books "American Pie" and "The Bread Baker's Apprentice".

His blog contains some info on upcoming classes showcasing his new book.


Edited by gfron1 (log)

Support your local farmer

Currently reading:

The Art of Simple Food by Alice Waters

Just finished reading:

The 100-Mile Diet by Alisa Smith & J. B. MacKinnon

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Hmmm, strange, I just ordered it from Ten Speed Press, they didn't say that I would have to wait until October, :huh: I hope it is on it's way! Blessings, Shawn <><

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I just ordered it from Amazon and can't wait to get it. I didn't realize it had been published. Thanks for the heads-up! :smile:


Ilene

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Mine arrived on.... Thursday I believe. So far, I have only flipped the pages. With any luck, I can actually delve a little more deeply tomorrow!

Watch your mailboxes :smile:


"There are no mistakes in bread baking, only more bread crumbs"

*Bernard Clayton, Jr.

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As one of the recipe testers for the new book, I got an e-mail from Peter on Monday saying he has several boxes of them and we could order copies directly from him. So I am waiting.....first my check has to get to him.....then my book has to get to me.......(tapping feet).

I was so excited that I ordered two, one for me and one for his number two fan, my father. But today Dad called me up to tell me all about how marvelous the book is, and how he has spent three days just studying the introductory chapters, and I am having a hard time not driving straight out to every bookstore in town to get it RIGHT NOW!

As it is, he will have to give away his present copy when his signed copy arrives in the mail.

And I am going to go make some unyeasted bulgur bread while I wait for mine.

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Chapter's website in Canada now shows it being available so my copy should be on its way as well! :biggrin:


Support your local farmer

Currently reading:

The Art of Simple Food by Alice Waters

Just finished reading:

The 100-Mile Diet by Alisa Smith & J. B. MacKinnon

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Bought my copy today at Barnes & Noble here in Akron, OH. I've already devoured (sorry, pun intended) the first 100 or so pages and I have to say that it's a very informative read. I can't wait to see how utilizing some of Reinhart's new ideas can make my breads even better.


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Got the book, read the book, sourdough starter coming along well again, first bread made without the sourdough, and it is quite nice.

His "breakthrough" in this book is finding ways to improve the flavor and rising qualities of whole wheat breads. He is combining techniques to yield the flavor qualities of prolonger fermentation and autolyse on breads made with commercial yeast by making a separate yeast-less soaker dough and a yeasted biga or sourdough which are combined after 24 hrs to give the final dough to shape and bake.

He also has continued to work witht he mash technique which was one of the test recipes that was splendidly successful re flavor though quite messy to work with.

My first attempt with a yeasted biga plus soaker collapsed in proof (due to crazy work hours) but still tasted great. I can see I will have to work a bit to adapt it to my schedule--maybe taking it to work so I can warm it up several hours in a advance of coming home to shape/proof/bake.

Full of great info, appealing recipes, and clearly a keeper.

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I am so gald I decided to do a search before starting a thread!

BTW, the book we are talking about and baking from here is:

Peter Reinhart's Whole Grain Breads: New Techniques, Extraordinary Flavors

Those who bought and enjoyed baking from his Bread Baker's Apprentice (there is a thread here somewhere) must buy this outstanding book. I could not stop reading through it at Borders about a month ago so I went ahead and bought it. I mean he is using beer mash to make mash breads! I got to try that! Whole wheat Brioche? Defintily I need to try. The whole idea of making true whole grain breads (using zero white flour in almost all recipes) and having them turn light and tasty was a deffinit selling point.

So far I have tried two recipes. The first one after reading the long intro about the 'new technique' and such which comprises about a third of the book is the good old 'Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread'. He recommends making that first before moving on. The recipe like all of them uses a soaker, a yeast starter and of course the final flour addition. Like all recipes it also requires time (2 days) but little effort. The result: Highly recommended. I have never tasted a bread made with 100% whole wheat that was so good. It was not dense or too acidic, but had a nice chewy texture, a soft crumb and a wonderful earthy taste. It also freezes very well BTW.

Here are a couple of pictures:

gallery_5404_94_340156.jpg

gallery_5404_94_130548.jpg

Next recipe coming soon...after I upload the pics.


Edited by FoodMan (log)

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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I'm on my third bread from this book. The third, the transitional rye hearth meteil is in the oven now, so I don't know how it tastes yet. The other two, the traditional hearth whole wheat and the potato rosemary bread tasted really good, especially the potato rosemary, which was like having a meal in a loaf -- very savory and delicious.

The only problem I've had with the breads is that instead of getting any oven spring, I seem to get a bit of "oven collapse." The loaves just aren't as big as I think they should be. As a result, the crumb is a bit tighter than I'd like. Any suggestions?

Also, it would be good to get some hands on training so that one can tell the difference between sticky, tacky, and very tacky dough. It's hard to tell that from pictures.


Check out our Fooddoings and more at A View from Eastmoreland

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I don't have the book yet, but read through parts of it at the bookstore. It looks like it could be a major work in the world of bread. The techniques he describes seem unique, and like a step up from what he's done in the past. I wouldn't be surprised if this leads to a second edition of the breadmaker's apprentice, updated with the new approach.

My breadmaking jag is behind me for now, but if i ever get into it again I'll snap up this book first thing.


Notes from the underbelly

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Does anyone here bake regularly from Whole Grain Breads by Peter Reinhart? I've been getting excellent results from using his "epoxy" method of constructing the final dough.

In a nutshell, The final dough is made from half starter and half soaker prepared at least a day before baking. The starter and soaker are then cut up and combined on baking day (this is where the "epoxy" analogy comes from).

I think the best advantage of this technique is that the final dough can do a quicker final rise compared to more traditional methods. It's possible to have freshly baked bread by dinnertime even on a busy weeknight. Most of the flavor development comes from the large amount of starter and soaker, so the final dough can get mixed with fairly large amounts of additional instant yeast and rise quickly on baking day.

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I ordered mine last week and have received notification that its in my mail box in MI.  I'll pick it up on Wednesday.

I can't wait to start baking from it!!

hahaha, the best laid plans eh?

I'm sorry to report I havent baked a darn thing from this book.

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I just bought this book and made the Struan bread last weekend and it turned out awful. Fine rise and texture, but something was off in the flavor and it was way too salty for my taste. I'm putting down the off flavor to my use of soymilk, which I have never used in bread. I will probably try another recipe this weekend.

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Been working my way through the book and it's been great -- the scheduling is a lot easier to work with even on a weekday because the second half (after the biga and soaker have matured) is really quick compared to more traditional methods.

I'm working on a batch of hapanleipa - anise scented flat rye bread.

anadama bread:

whole-grain-anadama-bread-crumb.jpg

pumpernickel bagels:

pumpernickel-bagel-crumb.jpg


Edited by judec (log)

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I am topping this thread b/c I received the book for Christmas and I am looking for guidance. I have successfully made several recipes from Reinhart's Bread Bakers Apprentice, and am a regular at making the No Knead Bread from the NYT article (I make 2-3 loaves of that each week). But, I want to make healthier, whole grain breads.

I am most curious as to whether anyone has tried the miche? I LOVE Poilane bread, and would be extremely happy if I can develop the skill to make something similar.

Anyone have updates?

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