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Roasting tomatoes


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I want to try that too. I've roasted many veggies, usually with some olive oil, salt and pepper, but not many fruits, and never tomatoes..

"...which usually means underflavored, undersalted modern French cooking hidden under edible flowers and Mexican fruits."

- Jeffrey Steingarten, in reference to "California Cuisine".

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YUM! Roasted tomatoes are so good when you make them yourself.

When I was growing up my mum being the good Italian cook she is today, would slow roast Roma tomatoes that have been cut in half and placed on a baking tray lined with non-stick baking paper. Simply dressed with olive oil, sea salt and fresh rosemary and whole garlic scattered.

The trick to a rich flavour is to keep the over at a low temperature and bake them overnight. Of cause when it was bed time all the roasted garlic would have been eaten up we were too young to care about going to bed with garlic breath and the garlic had done its job of effusing the oil.

Mums dedication to her cooking would have her wake up at all hours of the night to reset the timer on the oven.. However by early morning her efforts were rewarded and we would have beautiful bottled dried tomatoes for another week.

Respectably you could bake them during the day but this just wasnt what was done in my house growing up..

They wouldn't last past lunch time.

Edited by Two fingers of Scotch (log)
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  • 6 months later...

It depends on the type of tomato, where it was obtained and what you intend to do with them.

For example:

tomatoes1.jpg

these were canned organic tomatoes that were slow-roasted at 250 F for 6 hours -- I wanted to concentrate their flavor to approximate what I would expect if they had been fresh. hard to obtain equivalent tomatoes in the middle of December unless you buy hothouse varieties (and those don't really have the same "oomph" I'm looking for)

tomatoes2.jpg

these beauties were a tray of yellow plum tomatoes that were roasted at 200 F for 10 hours, then transformed into confit. nothing's better than pulling out a jar of tomato confit in the depth of winter. it's like jarred sunshine.

and then there are times when you want a quick confit, like this:

tomatoes3.jpg

tomatoes4.jpg

2 ripe Jersey tomatoes in an olive oil bath with salt, pepper and parsley. These were roasted at 350 F for 90 minutes -- just enough to transform their texture to a luscious softness while simultaneously infusing the oil with their essence.

you can tell that I'm a freak when it comes to tomatoes. :wink:

Edited by SobaAddict70 (log)
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I used to roast tomatoes low and slow in the oven. When I tasted them, they didn't taste much different than moistened sun-dried tomatoes. And I can get those really cheap at Restaurant Depot. Now, when ripe tomatoes are available, I cut them lengthwise into sixths or eighths ( depending on size), spray on some olive oil when they are on a foil-lined rimmed cookie tray, and pop them into my blazing hot (600 degrees plus) outdoor pizza oven. Then keep close watch and rotate the trays frequently. Takes about 15 to 30 minutes, and they come out charred and caramelized. The flavor is to die for, they're so good and intense. Then I can use them on almost anything, but they do something magical to sandwiches.

Ray

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I have lots of tomatoes coming in right now, and I am in the midst of canning sauce and salsa. Being an extremely lazy person, I hate standing over the stove and stirring a vat of bubbling sauce, and being spattered by plops of boiling tomato.

So. . . .instead of simmering sauce to thicken it, I now take all the ingredients of my sauce (tomatoes, green peppers, onion, celery, garlic), chop them coarsely and spread them on oiled half sheet pans. I roast at 400 for an hour or more, until the tomatoes are bit browned around the edges. Then I scrape the veggies into a big pot, whiz them up with the stick blender, and can or freeze. No stirring, no scorching, no tomatoes cooked onto the top of the stove. The sauce is naturally sweet--sometimes so sweet that I have to add vinegar.

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sparrowgrass
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Summer has finally started to give me serious amounts of tomato. My current favorite roasting method involves cutting out the core, filling with oil marinated blue cheese and putting them on a hot grill until the skin blisters and the cheese melts. The centers of the tomato still taste garden fresh while the outside is nicely roasted with some caramelization and then there is that blue cheese...

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Tomatoes.jpg

These are some very ripe ones I roasted last summer - I skinned, cut in half, concussed them, then put in the oven at 200° F for about 10 hrs with plenty of olive oil, garlic, thyme and sea salt on them. They kept under olive oil in the fridge well into the winter.

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Pam Brunning Editor Food & Wine, the Journal of the European & African Region of the International Wine & Food Society

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  • 8 months later...

Stopped in a new (to me) restaurant today for coffee and ordered a piperade with eggs poached on top -- the piperade was made with fire-roasted tomatoes and was unbelievably delicious. Will try some of these ideas for making the tomatoes and see if I can recreate that piperade.

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LOL! Are you sure they are not using the Muir Glen Fire roasted tomatoes?

Try tossing with a bit of oil and broiling them or roasting high heat until the skin gets blacked. May be let them cool un covered so they don't get too soggy and let them come to room temp.

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LOL! Are you sure they are not using the Muir Glen Fire roasted tomatoes?

Try tossing with a bit of oil and broiling them or roasting high heat until the skin gets blacked. May be let them cool un covered so they don't get too soggy and let them come to room temp.

Don't know if Muir Glen is up here in Canukistan. Used to get them at Whole Foods in the States. But will look. In the meantime, imma try some of those roasted tomatoes.

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I use Bayless's method from Mexican Kitchen which is basically a cast iron pan covered in tin foil and cut up to high. It still gives the flavor concentration of roasting in the oven but also gives a little char to the skin that I like, makes for a great salsa or pasta sauce.

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  • 9 years later...

@Dorie Greenspan wrote, beautifully as she does, about a slow-roasted tomato she had eaten in Giverny, while paying a visit to Monet's house and garden. And how she wanted to recreate the recipe. So -  from the NY Times Magazine a Sunday or two ago...

 

Slow-Roasted Tomatoes With Olive Oil and Lime

 

image.png.ca1c3236ecf0f250d9e6f7a0c2dbe7c4.png

 

But what really got me, I mean really, is the garnish on the styled tomato. Imagine that!  Some here are probably apoplectic.

 

Here's the full piece...Everything You Love About Tomatoes, Amplified

Edited by weinoo
To insert the full article text. (log)
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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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12 minutes ago, weinoo said:

@Dorie Greenspan wrote, beautifully as she does, about a slow-roasted tomato she had eaten in Giverny, while paying a visit to Monet's house and garden. And how she wanted to recreate the recipe. So -  from the NY Times Magazine a Sunday or two ago...

 

Slow-Roasted Tomatoes With Olive Oil and Lime

 

 

But what really got me, I mean really, is the garnish on the styled tomato. Imagine that!  Some here are probably apoplectic.

 

Looks good to me.

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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2 hours ago, weinoo said:

@Dorie Greenspan wrote, beautifully as she does, about a slow-roasted tomato she had eaten in Giverny, while paying a visit to Monet's house and garden. And how she wanted to recreate the recipe. So -  from the NY Times Magazine a Sunday or two ago...

 

Slow-Roasted Tomatoes With Olive Oil and Lime

 

image.png.ca1c3236ecf0f250d9e6f7a0c2dbe7c4.png

 

But what really got me, I mean really, is the garnish on the styled tomato. Imagine that!  Some here are probably apoplectic.

 

Here's the full piece...Everything You Love About Tomatoes, Amplified

 

What's the temp and time to cook this beauty?

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So here is a first try at   @weinoo's roasted tomato.

 

Steam-peeled in the CSO, then 220 F x 3 hours in the Breville. It was a BIG tomato so I upped the temp. Before cooking I sugared and salted the surface.

 

Definitely worth doing again.  Its firm enough to slice and then cut on the plate but deep flavored and tender.

 

089.jpg

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