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I haven't found a previous thread about this, so what pasta shapes do you like and why? I'm sure we must have both logical preferences and aesthetic predelictions:)

I must admit I'm very much a no.1 spaghetti guy. But recently I returned to tagliatelle, finally overcoming the 1980s trauma of too many carbonaras :biggrin: So who likes what? Penne because they're holey, farfalle cos they're pretty, orrechiette cos they take a sauce well... and more...?

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I like wide noodles, whether you call them Tagliatelle or something else in your neck of the woods. Double wide "miniskirt" as well. Fantastic with meat sauces.

I like Bucatini. It's more or less replaced spaghetti and linguine in our household.

I like radiatore, particularly in Mac and Cheese.

Gemelli is great with seafood sauces.

Edited by Jason Perlow (log)

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Radiatore, Tagliatelle, Gemelli, ORCCHIETTE...... :biggrin: ...........

love them all. Minipenne, too.

But the pasta of my youth, in tomato soup, is tubetini.........

absolutely NOT TO BE FOUND in California...........

tubetini, with a little browned butter :wub:

All the rest are pedestrian............

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I forgot that we might need a glossary to cover the regional differences too!

So what's with bucatini? I used to hate what we called tubular spaghetti when i was a teenager. You think i should try it again? LOL.

-- lamington a.k.a. Duncan Markham

The Gastronomer's Bookshelf - collaborative book reviews about all things food and wine

Syrup & Tang - candid commentary and flavourful fancies

"It's healthy. It's cake. It's chocolate cake."

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Pappardelle, rigatoni and penne are my favorites. Spaghetti-type of noodles have never really done it for me. Not sure why, actually.

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Penne has to be the most used for me - supremely versatile and takes both tomato and creamy sauces well.

Orichiette (Probably spelt that wrong!) I love for it's dense texture and good 'bite'.

Papardelle with braised meat sauces or also maldafine (Slightly narrower than pappardelle with crinkly edges)

As for the long thin pastas I'm a linguine guy - hardly ever use spaghetti.

I am a sucker for buying new and interesting shapes though. I bought some huge spiral things recently - no idea on the name. Wasn't to keen though - A slight wormy feeling on the tongue!

I love animals.

They are delicious.

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Full length fusilli (my friend called them worms) #9 thin spaghetti and medium shells. I like the shells because some stick together so they cook chewier than the separate ones.

and...Acini Pepe (peppercorns) for breakfast with mik and LOTS of butter

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Strozzapreti - a speciality of Romagna -twisted strips of pasta about 4-5cm long. I like the name - it means strangled priest. One of the legends created to explain the origin of the name goes back to the tradition of the women from Romagna preparing this type of pasta for the local priest, while the husbands, evidently a little bit more anticlerical, wished the priest would choke while he was stuffing himself with it.

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I love oriechette, as mentioned above, for it toothsomeness and the way it captures small chunks of sauce. The first pasta dish I made with these was with sausage and broccoli raab and it is still a favorite.

For similar reasons reasons I like gemelli which has two (twinned) short pieces of pasta fused together. This also works well with chunky small pieces of sauce.

Long, slippery pieces of paparadelle are classic and delicious with ragus.

I love orzo as a side dish in the summer--dressed after cooking with olive oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper and chopped up oil-cured olives and parsley. It's easy, delicious and goes with almost anything.

I must try bucatini--this fits well with carbonara, no?

Edited by ludja (log)
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I must try bucatini--this fits well with carbonara, no?

I believe spaghetti is the "default" pasta for carbonara, but I could be wrong. Bucatini is for amatriciana.

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I must try bucatini--this fits well with carbonara, no?

I believe spaghetti is the "default" pasta for carbonara, but I could be wrong. Bucatini is for amatriciana.

I completely agree about Carbonara, spaghetti or spaghettoni is the pasta to use.

Amatriciana is an altogether more complex affair. The thing is, there actually are two kinds of Amatriciana: the one from Amatrice and the one popular in Rome. The first one has only tomato, ganciale, pecorino and a little chilli pepper in the sauce, the second has onions (and garlic sometimes) and a dash of wine or vinegar added to the sauce. In Amatrice they eat their pasta with spaghetti or penne, in Rome strictly with bucatini.

Il Forno: eating, drinking, baking... mostly side effect free. Italian food from an Italian kitchen.
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QUOTE(Brad Ballinger @ May 12 2006, 02:48 AM)

QUOTE(ludja @ May 11 2006, 10:30 AM)

I must try bucatini--this fits well with carbonara, no?

I believe spaghetti is the "default" pasta for carbonara, but I could be wrong. Bucatini is for amatriciana.

I completely agree about Carbonara, spaghetti or spaghettoni is the pasta to use.

Nonetheless, the Trattoria La Carbonara cooks penne for what it claims as its signature dish. When in Rome...

Edited by Pontormo (log)

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The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

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I completely agree about Carbonara, spaghetti or spaghettoni is the pasta to use.

Nonetheless, the Trattoria La Carbonara cooks penne for what it claims as its signature dish. When in Rome...

Didn't know that, thanks for the info.

Plenty of places that serve spaghetti alla carbonara in Rome though :smile: .

Il Forno: eating, drinking, baking... mostly side effect free. Italian food from an Italian kitchen.
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