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MatthewB

Salt Lake City Restaurants

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Thanks for the info. One more question. Any spots for cheap eats near the convention center?

cchen:

Yup! :biggrin: All within a block of my SLC office :wink: and 1 to 2 blocks from the Salt Palace:

Cafe Atlantic (or Atlantico?) in 300 South block of Main St., East side of street. Eastern European......great smoked beef, feta, gyros, stuffed cabage rolls, salads etc.

A Chilean place on the West side of Main in the 200 block. Empanadas and stuff....cheap and good.

Curry in a Hurry..........same side and same block of Main..............pretty good Pakistani style curry, very cheap.

House of Kabob..............same side and same block of Main.............pretty good pan-middle eastern food......reasonable.

Also the Thai Orchid is pretty good and reasonable.......a couple of blocks west of the Salt Palace on 200 South. Next door is Cup of Joe...........a great coffee joint.

I second the vote for Junior's Taco's. I am less inclined toward the brewpubs, but that's just me, I guess :unsure:

An excellent Mexican place............a little further afield is Julia's..............about 10th or 11th West between 1st and 2nd South, east side of the street. Mom and Pop place................no English spoken..........Very good and cheap!

My favorite Mexican place is really south in Murray. Tacozana at about 8000 South State on the West side of the road, next to a bowling alley. Superb and very cheap. Again, limited English.

Have a great stay :smile:

Bill


Bill Benge

Moab, Utah

"I like eggs", Leon Spinks

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cchen-

I must second Bill's recommendation of Takashi.  I eat there about once a week and it is always fabulous.  I have not ordered omakase style there but have in Vegas and CA at comparably priced restaurants and I am sure you would not find the pricing to be astronomical.  Then again, I suppose it depends on what you end up with!  I would say go for it.

Happy eating~

Angela  :biggrin:

Hi Angela:

Lucky you :smile: . I made it to Takashi's about once a week when I spent more time in SLC............now it's only about every two weeks............but that's almost enough to keep me from totally "jonesin'" and going into withdrawal for his great sushi :unsure:

I was a devoted customer of Takashi at the Shogun for about 15 years.............same great sushi..............just a little "seedier" ambience :rolleyes:

I love his fried oyster lunch specials and the rice wedges :wub: as well as all of his sushi and sashimi.

This sushi talk has me really looking forward to getting up there Thursday and Friday.............YUM!!! (And, anyway, it's "Jeep Safari" down here in God's Country and really a ZOO this week!!..............no way to get into any restaurant in Moab right now :wacko:)

Maybe I'll run into you at Takashi sometime.

Best,

Bill


Bill Benge

Moab, Utah

"I like eggs", Leon Spinks

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Hello Bill,

Actually spent last weekend in Moab (with a side trip to Goblin Valley and Little Wild Horse Canyon) with my daughters. Had a great time except I am a bit scraped and bruised :sad: Looked at some property in Castle Valley but didn't really find anything.

I am not sure I would call myself lucky... more like addicted. Need to go into recovery because the kobe appetizer alone is seriously draining my bank account. I was a devoted customer at Shogun too but never liked the seating much prefer everything at the new place. Except one of the wines I tried last time. :blink:

Maybe I will run into you at Takashi sometime. Problem is, how will I know it is you??

Take care,

Angela


Edited by angberke (log)

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Bill,

It was great to see you at the restraunt yesterday. I'm glad you guys decided to stop by, made my night. I hope eveerything lived up to Metropolitian's reputation.

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So I had lunch at Takashi, and suprisingly they didn't have an omakase. Takashi-san said that most SLCers aren't interested in that level of sushi experience, which I can understand. Anyway, here are pics of what I had (except for 2 pieces bluefin toro sashimi):

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cchen/sets/72057594108811038/

Overall, everything was great and very fresh. I had a great time. Thanks for the recommendation!

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So I had lunch at Takashi, and suprisingly they didn't have an omakase. Takashi-san said that most SLCers aren't interested in that level of sushi experience, which I can understand. Anyway, here are pics of what I had (except for 2 pieces bluefin toro sashimi):

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cchen/sets/72057594108811038/

Overall, everything was great and very fresh. I had a great time. Thanks for the recommendation!

Hi cchen,

Happy to hear that you enjoyed your meal. I am not surprised to hear there wasn't an omakase. Your photos are gorgeous and now my mouth is watering. Too bad I am on a layover right now on my way to Boston. :hmmm:

Take care!

Angela

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LOL - belated reply (with a faded memory)....

LOVED Red Iguana - fantastic assortment of moles. Line out the door by the time I left the place. (Just beat the crowd.) My bosses are at OR this weekend, so I'm steering them that way.

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We're in SLC for three nights next month. We don't really drink, but we're looking for good food options.

Incidently, we booked the romance package at the sheraton for 20 bucks less a night than the standard room rate. Includes a bottle of wine, go figure.

lalala


I have a relatively uninteresting life unless you like travel and food. Read more about it here.

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So, Metropolitan and Red Iguana.

Anything else worth visiting?

Takashi has some killer sushi and Fresco has some really great northern Italian (they just rolled out a new menu in fact). Incidentally Metropolitan rolls out it's late fall/winter menu on Tuesday :)

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I will be staying at The Canyons towards the end of the month hopefully to do a little skiing in addition to dining. I have a reservation for Metropolitan, want to hit The Red Iguana and Takashi. Is there anyplace else that I really must hit either in addition to or in place of the restaurants I just mentioned? Canyons area? Park City? We wil be in a condo with a kitchen. Any good food markets?

Thanks for your help.


John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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I will be staying at The Canyons towards the end of the month hopefully to do a little skiing in addition to dining. I have a reservation for  Metropolitan, want to hit The Red Iguana and Takashi. Is there anyplace else that I really must hit either in addition to or in place of the restaurants I just mentioned? Canyons area? Park City? We wil be in a condo with a kitchen. Any good food markets?

Thanks for your help.

If you come back in January, come up to Snowbird and I'll feed you!! :biggrin::laugh: I ship a lot of food out there (meat from Ottomanelli's, fish from a guy up in Port Washington, Wa.) I think its Wegmans, they have an online service and will deliver groceries to your condo.

The restaurants up at Snowbird are not so fantastic, mostly we eat in.

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I will be staying at The Canyons towards the end of the month hopefully to do a little skiing in addition to dining. I have a reservation for  Metropolitan, want to hit The Red Iguana and Takashi. Is there anyplace else that I really must hit either in addition to or in place of the restaurants I just mentioned? Canyons area? Park City? We wil be in a condo with a kitchen. Any good food markets?

Thanks for your help.

If you come back in January, come up to Snowbird and I'll feed you!! :biggrin::laugh: I ship a lot of food out there (meat from Ottomanelli's, fish from a guy up in Port Washington, Wa.) I think its Wegmans, they have an online service and will deliver groceries to your condo.

The restaurants up at Snowbird are not so fantastic, mostly we eat in.

Judith, that is a truly tempting offer, but alas, I will not be able to take you up on it this time! I do like the idea of Wegman's though. I will look into that. Thanks.


John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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Quick report. Thanks to bad weather in Chicago we had an abbreviated trip,and only got to Metropolitan and Red Iguana.

Red Iguana was superb - great Mexican. The mole poblano was the highlight although I'm still not sure that turkey was my favourite ingredient. By comparison the cochinita pibil was bland (but tasty). Eventually tried dipping the pork from that into the mole sauce and that was my favourite combination.

Our appetiser was the Rajas de Chile Poblano con Queso y Chorizo - also great.

And can't beat the wine prices either - a Chilean Carmenere was $16 (not the one on the menu, but nobody seemed to mind). Great food and value.

Metropolitan was OK but may be a disappointment for 'Big City' visitors. The food is 'correct' but uninspired - didn't seem to take full advantage of local ingredients. And seasoning was erratic - liberal salting and aggressive vinaigrette were the lingering memory. However, the service was exceptional (by Toronto standards) - very friendly and helpful - always eager to please. I almost feel like a grinch but the food was unmemorable (actually an excellent succotash - the only thing that I recall). I'm obviously aware of the reputation for relatively bland food in SLC and Metropolitan seems to play it safe. Having said that, mostly competent, no disasters (OK maybe the vinaigrette) and huge portions. The wine list was also 'safe' (national distribution brands) - a pleasant meal without any peaks or valleys.

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Quick report. Thanks to bad weather in Chicago we had an abbreviated trip,and only got to Metropolitan and Red Iguana.

Red Iguana was superb - great Mexican. The mole poblano was the highlight although I'm still not sure that turkey was my favourite ingredient. By comparison the cochinita pibil was bland (but tasty). Eventually tried dipping the pork from that into the mole sauce and that was my favourite combination.

Our appetiser was the Rajas de Chile Poblano con Queso y Chorizo - also great.

And can't beat the wine prices either - a Chilean Carmenere was $16 (not the one on the menu, but nobody seemed to mind). Great food and value.

Metropolitan was OK but may be a disappointment for 'Big City' visitors. The food is 'correct' but uninspired - didn't seem to take full advantage of local ingredients. And seasoning was erratic - liberal salting and aggressive vinaigrette were the lingering memory. However, the service was exceptional (by Toronto standards) - very friendly and helpful - always eager to please. I almost feel like a grinch but the food was unmemorable (actually an excellent succotash - the only thing that I recall). I'm obviously aware of the reputation for relatively bland food in SLC and Metropolitan seems to play it safe. Having said that, mostly competent, no disasters (OK maybe the vinaigrette) and huge portions. The wine list was also 'safe' (national distribution brands) - a pleasant meal without any peaks or valleys.

If I may ask what did you have at Metropolitan? As for the wine, it's a touch tougher in Utah to get some of the wines we would like as all wine sales are through the DABC (Dept of Alcohol Beverage Control) so what we can buy is limited to what they bring in.

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If I may ask what did you have at Metropolitan?  As for the wine, it's a touch tougher in Utah to get some of the wines we would like as all wine sales are through the DABC (Dept of Alcohol Beverage Control) so what we can buy is limited to what they bring in.

Meal at Metropolitan:

Amuse – tomatillo/avocado/orange with Microbasil

The orange swamped other components – acid even wiped out texture of avocado.

Roasted Pistachio Soup (Charles de Fere Blanc de Blanc)

Roasted Red Pepper Bisque (Conundrum, Caymus)

I preferred the Bisque. The aromatics on the pistachio soup (? From a pistachio oil swirled on top) were excellent, but the flavour was muted in the soup. The Charles de Fere went well with both soups.

Crab cake with aioli and mixed greens (Soave-Anselmi)

Shaved Asparagus on squash, with White asparagus, cress and roasted garlic (Sauvignon Blanc – Matua Valley).

This was least successful course. Fierce vinaigrette on the mixed greens and asparagus dish was very salty. Despite the perfect ‘theoretical’ match of the N Zealand Sauvignon Blanc with the asparagus, it was actually too fruity.

Foie Gras with Pumpkin/mint

Foie Gras with Apple, Maple Syrup and Cream

No notes on the pumpkin/mint.

The maple syrup was just detectable on the aromatics. The apple was probably two different types as one was crisp slices (excellent textural contrast) but the foie gras was on a bed of ‘mushy apple’ – reminded me of a Golden Delicious texture, but not taste.

Seared scallop (two presentations)

One with roasted chard and ? (Elderton Semillon)

Second with corn succotash (Calera Chardonnay)

As I mentioned above succotash was superb.

The ? above, was because we were told it was potato, but it tasted sweeter (? Sweet potato). We were told later it was squash (didn’t record what type).

Palate Cleanser of Lichee Sorbet and kiwi soup

Didn’t work at all – much too sweet – almost like a dessert. Sweet rather than acidic/bitter.

Oxtail with parsnip (Cabernet Sauvignon – Hess Select).

A great ‘comfort’ dish. Well cooked and presented. I love parsnips anyway, and these were good – for my taste they could have been crisper, but that’s my preference, not a criticism of the presentation.

Dessert was a lime tart (Moscato d’Asti/ Taylor LBV).

Fine – nothing outstanding – but I finished it, so must have been OK.

And, of course, no coffee offered – but that’s a Mormon thing (I presume).

What surprised me most was no mushrooms anywhere (aren’t they in season?).

I thought the use of squash appropriate (although textures were similar). The pistachio soup looked great on paper, but didn’t quite work for me – perhaps throw in some pistachio crumbs to add texture.

All-in-all I enjoyed the meal – especially that they provided separate choices for each of us for many of the courses. And service was excellent all through. But when I wrote the first review I didn’t refer to my notes so you can see what the lingering recollections were – service, salt, succotash, and vinaigrette.

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I will be staying at The Canyons towards the end of the month hopefully to do a little skiing in addition to dining. I have a reservation for  Metropolitan, want to hit The Red Iguana and Takashi. Is there anyplace else that I really must hit either in addition to or in place of the restaurants I just mentioned? Canyons area? Park City? We wil be in a condo with a kitchen. Any good food markets?

Thanks for your help.

If you come back in January, come up to Snowbird and I'll feed you!! :biggrin::laugh: I ship a lot of food out there (meat from Ottomanelli's, fish from a guy up in Port Washington, Wa.) I think its Wegmans, they have an online service and will deliver groceries to your condo.

The restaurants up at Snowbird are not so fantastic, mostly we eat in.

Judith, that is a truly tempting offer, but alas, I will not be able to take you up on it this time! I do like the idea of Wegman's though. I will look into that. Thanks.

I looked up Wegman's online and they do not appear to have a store in Utah. Might it have been some other store?


John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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OH!! I'm sorry!! It's Albertson's. sorry... I was going by my memory, and you see where that got us!

Got it. Thanks. :smile:


John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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Quick report. Thanks to bad weather in Chicago we had an abbreviated trip,and only got to Metropolitan and Red Iguana.

Red Iguana was superb - great Mexican. The mole poblano was the highlight although I'm still not sure that turkey was my favourite ingredient. By comparison the cochinita pibil was bland (but tasty). Eventually tried dipping the pork from that into the mole sauce and that was my favourite combination.

Our appetiser was the Rajas de Chile Poblano con Queso y Chorizo - also great.

And can't beat the wine prices either - a Chilean Carmenere was $16 (not the one on the menu, but nobody seemed to mind). Great food and value.

Metropolitan was OK but may be a disappointment for 'Big City' visitors. The food is 'correct' but uninspired - didn't seem to take full advantage of local ingredients. And seasoning was erratic - liberal salting and aggressive vinaigrette were the lingering memory. However, the service was exceptional (by Toronto standards) - very friendly and helpful - always eager to please. I almost feel like a grinch but the food was unmemorable (actually an excellent succotash - the only thing that I recall). I'm obviously aware of the reputation for relatively bland food in SLC and Metropolitan seems to play it safe. Having said that, mostly competent, no disasters (OK maybe the vinaigrette) and huge portions. The wine list was also 'safe' (national distribution brands) - a pleasant meal without any peaks or valleys.

I had the opportunity to dine at both restaurants recently. My impressions were similar to yours in some respects and different in others.

Red Iguana: Very good Mexican food and certainly one of the better Mexcian restaurants that I have been to in the US. I applaud their wide variety of moles. They were all tasty, though not as complex as some I have had. The cochinita pibil was very tasty, as were enchiladas and tamales which were on special. The restaurant has a good low key atmosphere. When we arrived for lunch around 1PM on a Saturday we were able to get a table right away and in fact had a choice of tables. It wasn't too long after that the place filled and a line formed out the door.

Metropolitan: A Modern, well-appointed space. I had requested a well-lit table when I made my reservation via OpenTable and indeed we received the perfect table for food photography in a restaurant. A corner table, it had its own overhead light and was well-lit without being garish. The only problem though is that I forgot my camera back at the condo in Park City! It was unfortunate too because the food was very well-presented and attractive.

Our amuse consisted of apple-smoked bacon, chestnut and a few other ingredients. It was tasty, but I found the texture a little too one dimensionally chewy. This was the low point of the meal and it wasn't all that low. We did not have the tasting menu as we were tired and not too hungry to begin with. We shared appetizers including the crab cake that was accompanied by an allioli. I found it neither oversalted nor accompanied by an overly assertive salad; Mushrooms Metropolitan, a variety of wild-type mushrooms in a cream sauce - presented in a ramekin (excellent); salmon tartar with brioche and creme fraiche (very tasty); and the creamy roasted pistachio soup (my favorite) redolent of roasted pistachio. This was the most unique dish of the appetizers.

I followed with the seared foie gras that was served with pumpkin and "fall spices" - a very tasty interpretation that was a new combination for me. It worked quite well. My wife had the "Napoleon" salad layered with slices of beets and turnips. I did not try it, though she seemed to enjoy it.

Main courses consisted of my sisters bison tenderloin - beautifully prepared and served with a light red glaze - delicious; my wife's diver scallops served over greens and pureed squash; and my duck cooked "sous vide" with diced sauteed celeriac and morels. I enjoyed my duck, one meat I had never previously had cooked sous vide. As I thought it would, the process worked very well leaving an evenly cooked and juicy meat that was finished with nicely rendered skin.

We accompanied our meal with a lovely Torii Mor 2004 pinot noir from the Willamette Valley for $64. I found the wine list to be reasonably varied and fairly priced. It included some serious Bordeaux as well as Turley Zins and Petite Syrahs and a 2002 Coullee de la Serrant from Nicolas Joly. Considering that we were in SLC, Utah I was impressed with the list.

We were too full for dessert, but were given lovely little cream puffs. As previously mentioned by other posters, everyone was extremely friendly. The service was superb.

I found the restaurant to be a welcome oasis in Salt Lake City. The decor is modern and comfortable, the service warm and professional and the food, creative, well-executed and nicely presented. The former Executive Chef recently left to become the Chef at STK in NYC. His replacement came from within the restaurant. In an unusual twist the restaurant has promoted three, including eGullet Society member Jed Banta, to Executive Chef. It remains to be seen how well this arrangement will work over time, but if my dinner is any indication they have a bright future.


John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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John, I'm glad to hear that you had such a good time. It was a delight to meet you and we hope to see you in again next time you are in the area.

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John, I'm glad to hear that you had such a good time.  It was a delight to meet you and we hope to see you in again next time you are in the area.

Thanks, Jed. I would certainly return when back in the area. Although we ate pretty well throughout our trip and I was tired from traveling my meal at Metropolitan as well as a subsequent one at The red Iguana with a small group were my two favprites of the week. Obviously they were very different meals and situations.

We had opportunity to return to The Red Iguana late last week accompanied by two young couples (relative to us! :raz:) of relations. We had a feast that included various quesadilla appetizers (Cheese and San Francisco), encurtidos (fried jalapenos stuffed with shrimp and jack cheese) as well as orders of chicken and beef flautas that were superb. Everyone ordered his or her own main dish. I ordered the mole coloradito that came with pork loin, refried beans and rice. This had a good bite to it and a generous portion of pork. The beans were deliciously creamy and better than I remember them from the previous Saturday afternoon. Everyone seemed to enjoy their dinners. I was so stuffed that I didn't even finish my mole. I brought it back to our condo and had it for lunch the next day as my wife did with her meal. All in all, I found the food to be even better than it was on Saturday for lunch. Maybe the moles had more time to blend flavors and become more complex. In any case it was a perfect spot for this convivial group. It also helped that we had a reservation as we were seven people, although the lines, once again, didn't really form until after we arrived.

Though I didn't take any photos that night here are some from our lunch:

gallery_8158_3985_61244.jpg

gallery_8158_3985_51762.jpg

This iguana was green.

gallery_8158_3985_52794.jpg

Cochinita Pibil with rice and black beans.

gallery_8158_3985_74851.jpg

Traditional enchiladas with chicken

gallery_8158_3985_3800.jpg

Tamales with chicken and mole poblano.

gallery_8158_3985_32673.jpg

Mole sampler with from the top clockwise, mole poblano, de almendras, negro, amarillo and coloradito.


John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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My wife and I ventured back into Salt lake City for a sushi dinner at Takashi, where we sat in front of the master. Although parking was a little bit of a hassle (trying to slip dollar bills through a pinhole), the restaurant itself was attractive and mostly comfortable. As I mentioned we sat at the sushi bar in front of Takashi. The space was a little tight and it was a little difficult to watch him work as the refrigerator case was in the way.

gallery_8158_3985_109684.jpg

Though the menu was intriguing, we asked him to prepare whatever he felt was best, an 0ff-the-cuff-omakase. We told him that we had no dietary aversions.He obliged with a couple of different sashimi based compositions.

gallery_8158_3985_30977.jpg

Tuna and salmon sashimi with a slightly sweet garlic-laced sauce was one of my favorites of the evening. This was very good.

gallery_8158_3985_36752.jpg

Another sashimi platter that included octopus, yellowtail, tuna, salmon, escolar and a very crisp fried Spanish mackeral. This was all good with the mackeral being particularly interesting as we were instructed to eat everything but the eyes.

gallery_8158_3985_102721.jpg

I don't remember the name of this roll that included a tempura fried shrimp, eel, avocado and a sweet sauce. This was tasty but too sweet for my palate.

gallery_8158_3985_79802.jpg

Caribbean roll - this had yellowtail, sliced mango and chile peppers combining umami, spicy and sweet. I liked this better than the shrimp, but still a little sweet for my preference.

My wife was finished, but I asked if he had any uni.

gallery_8158_3985_15315.jpg

This uni was from Santa Barbara, California. It was fresh and delicious - my favorite course of the evening.

I had heard so many good things about this restaurant. I enjoyed it, just not as much as I had hoped to. While Takashi gets a lot of points for being one of the most creative Sushi restaurants that I have been too, it did not stack up ultimately in terms of variety and satisfaction compared to the best sushi restaurants that I have been too - but then given that it is located in Salt Lake City, Utah and not a major port, it would have been amazing if it would have been half as good as it was. One cannot go into this restaurant thinking that it will be outstanding compared to traditional, world-class sushi bars. Their basic fish quality is quite good, but I saw no evidence of any significant variety. If, however, one goes in looking for good, basic sushi-grade fish presented in unique, entertaining and tasty ways, Takashi won't disappoint.


John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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Some eGullet members may be aware of my particular interest in creative and ethnic traditional cuisines. By and large if the food is well prepared and tasty I like it whatever the label. Nevertheless, creative and traditional cuisines are what excite me the most.

Given that and the fact that it was opening night of the season for The Mariposa at Deer Valley, it should come as no surprise that I was not blown away by my meal. That is not to say that the meal was not well prepared or tasty or that the room was unattractive, the service poor or the restaurant grossly overpriced. Actually, even if it wasn't their first night of the season, none of those criticisms would have been valid. The food was well prepared and tasty. The room was attractive. The service was efficient, knowledgeable and friendly and the meal - especially the wine - quite reasonably priced as they offered a two-for-one opening week main course special. While all those things were true, there really wasn't much about the food that really excited me. It did excite me sister though, who much prefers this style of food over what I generally prefer.

What we had:

gallery_8158_3985_111692.jpg

The Tasting Menu

gallery_8158_3985_42001.jpg

The Ala Carte Menu

gallery_8158_3985_17328.jpg

A nice, but ultimately forgettable amuse.

I ordered the tasting menu. My wife and sister ordered apps and mains. It was a nice touch that they allowed an individual without the entire party to order the tasting menu.

gallery_8158_3985_96160.jpg

Fresh Dungeness Crabmeat, pea shoots, cucumber, avocado, sesame crackers, wasabi, soy and ginger sauces - nicely done and tasty. Mine.

gallery_8158_3985_20573.jpg

Kobe Beef Carpaccio, grilled red onion concasse, white truffle oil, lemon juice and shaved truffle. The beef was indeed from Kobe according to our waiter. The truffles lacked potency. My sister's app.

gallery_8158_3985_25004.jpg

Duck Confit and "Fromaggio" Tartufo Bianco Ravioli. This was a very meaty, heavy dish. From the "little things" department of nitpickiness, I am not sure what "Fromaggio" is. Is it "Formaggio?" Since there was only one of them in the order (it was quite large), it should have been a "Raviolo." My wife's app.

gallery_8158_3985_39805.jpg

Wild Mushroom Beggar's Purse, beaujolais reduction sauce, explorateur cheese, baby greens. tasty with a nice textural balance between the crisp phyllo and the soft mushrooms. Mine.

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Australian Lobster Tail, truffle-chive risotto, sauces of roma tomato and sugar snap pea. The broiled lobster tails were quite flavorful though a little tough. The risotto was heavy. Of the two sauces, though the combination was pretty, I thought the tomato worked better with the lobster by far. My wife's main.

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Sablefish Mariposa, honey-tamari glaze, fresh ginger sauce, shiitake mushroom-scallion rice cake. A signature dish, it wasn't as sweet as I feared it would be given the honey in the sauce. Mine.

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Prime Beef Tenderloin Filet, maple peppered bacon, crisp potatoes anna, sauce bourguignonne. The beef was basic with a very rich sauce. The potatoes anna were very well accomplished and delicious. My sister's main.

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Rocky Mountain lamb Chop, fresh pesto, crisp potatoes anna, roasted shallot sauce. This dish varied only in very subtle ways from the filet.

Throughout we shared a delicious and reasonably priced 2004 Laurene from Domaine Drouhin. The wines were very fairly priced from an impressive list. This was the highlight of the meal for me.

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Chocolate Snowball. Dense chocolate cake with whipped cream. A signature dessert. Tasty.

My comments are critical, but mostly dependant on my stylistic preferences and not a critique of the competence of the kitchen for the style of food that they prepare. What they did they did well. I just found it to be unexciting. My only real complaint about the restaurant was that the restrooms are located across the ski lodge cafeteria and down a flight of stairs.


John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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