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fifi

Oven Cooking - from your book

6 posts in this topic

While going through your new book, I was particularly taken with your use of the oven. I have depended on the oven for a lot of things for years. I put stock in there, chili, beans, and of course I am a big fan of braises. I always say that it really fits my inattentiveness. (I don't grill much.)

The really new technique to me was your Oven Baked Chowder. I would have never thought to do that. I reported on my trial run in our long running soup topic.

Ok, that was a winner. So you might expect that the Creamy Baked Polenta appealed to me as well. It came out beautifully and was a bit faster than some of the others that we discussed starting a couple of years ago here.

Do you actively try to adapt recipes for oven cooking?

Also, one thing I like about your recipes is that you invite fiddling. I usually do a recipe by the book the first time but I confess to fiddling from there. Are you a fiddler, too?


Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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While going through your new book, I was particularly taken with your use of the oven. I have depended on the oven for a lot of things for years. I put stock in there, chili, beans, and of course I am a big fan of braises. I always say that it really fits my inattentiveness. (I don't grill much.)

The really new technique to me was your Oven Baked Chowder. I would have never thought to do that. I reported on my trial run in our long running soup topic.

Ok, that was a winner. So you might expect that the Creamy Baked Polenta appealed to me as well. It came out beautifully and was a bit faster than some of the others that we discussed starting a couple of years ago here.

Do you actively try to adapt recipes for oven cooking?

Also, one thing I like about your recipes is that you invite fiddling. I usually do a recipe by the book the first time but I confess to fiddling from there. Are you a fiddler, too?

I have the same policy -- the first time I make a recipe I follow it exactly and after that I might change it, customize it. I think you owe it to the author to follow the recipe exactly the first time becauce they might know something you don't. For example, every time I see a Marcella Hazan recipe my instinct is to add more of everything and when I do that I mess it up. Her food is simple, absolutely delicious as is. Why mess with it?

The reason I have suggested making typical stovetop recipes in the oven is because the oven has a more even temperature than a stove top. The heat surrounds the pan, it does not just come from the burner underneath. So it is a gentler more failsafe way of cooking.


Sara Moulton

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I have the same policy -- the first time I make a recipe I follow it exactly and after that I might change it, customize it. I think you owe it to the author to follow the recipe exactly the first time becauce they might know something you don't. For example, every time I see a Marcella Hazan recipe my instinct is to add more of everything and when I do that I mess it up. Her food is simple, absolutely delicious as is. Why mess with it?

The reason I have suggested making typical stovetop recipes in the oven is because the oven has a more even temperature than a stove top. The heat surrounds the pan, it does not just come from the burner underneath. So it is a gentler more failsafe way of cooking.

So, do you really measure all the spices and seasonings in a recipe--even the first time? I'm a complete novice/home cook who has never had a lesson in her life, but I never measure unless I'm baking. I usually eye-ball it. Does that make me a bad person?

And thanks for being here--this is just a wonderful learning experience.


Deb

Liberty, MO

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I have the same policy -- the first time I make a recipe I follow it exactly and after that I might change it, customize it. I think you owe it to the author to follow the recipe exactly the first time becauce they might know something you don't. For example, every time I see a Marcella Hazan recipe my instinct is to add more of everything and when I do that I mess it up. Her food is simple, absolutely delicious as is. Why mess with it?

The reason I have suggested making typical stovetop recipes in the oven is because the oven has a more even temperature than a stove top. The heat surrounds the pan, it does not just come from the burner underneath. So it is a gentler more failsafe way of cooking.

So, do you really measure all the spices and seasonings in a recipe--even the first time? I'm a complete novice/home cook who has never had a lesson in her life, but I never measure unless I'm baking. I usually eye-ball it. Does that make me a bad person?

And thanks for being here--this is just a wonderful learning experience.

eyeballing spices is just fine, doubling the cream or stock in a recipe is not (= one of the ways I messed up Marcella's recipes)

Any cooking makes you a good person.


Sara Moulton

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I'll confess. I made your frittata with brie and bacon last night. I had killer bacon, from a local purveyor who sells bacon ends for an obscene price that are to die for. Then, I got out the brie. Well, there wasn't quite enough, and you know, I really like like my brie on toast with pepper jelly in the am, so I substituted the hunk of cheddar, diced, for the brie. Forgive me, for I did not follow the recipe exactly the first time. Well, it was exactly, except that I subbed the cheddar for the brie and may have been a bit heavy handed with the bacon (I tend to be a bit heavy handed with the pork products).

More importantly, the kids and I diced and whisked and frittated and made salad together, and we all ate together and talked about the days triumphs and trials.


Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

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Thanks! And your comment about liquids--when is it or isn't it acceptable to subsitute one liquid for another., i.e., broth for stock, non/low-fat milk for regular. And there are so many new products out there--there is even non-fat half and half. Have you found a way to incorporate these into recipes without sacrificing texture and taste?

Sorry if I'm asking too many questions.


Deb

Liberty, MO

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