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Bill Poster

What's Your Favorite Cocktail?

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Me, I've been completely enamored of the Last Word cocktail for the past few months.  Sooooo complex and yummy.  And purdy too.

Christopher

Aren't they wonderful!!! :biggrin:


KathyM

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Very dry Plymouth martini, up, in a chilled glass, garnished with a caperberry with the stem.


Cooking is chemistry, baking is alchemy.

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I also love Aviations, though...and manhattans...and Twentieth Century Cocktails...and and

Velvet Gloves !

if you love aviations, manhattans and 20th C's , you absolutely have to love Velvets Gloves too. (don't argue !)

(also what I think of as Spanish Gloves (with Soberano , Fundador, Cardinal Menodza etc etc ) and Greek Gloves (with Metaxa, which I used to dislike but which I now associate so much with Nikki and Danai, our absolutely wonderfull Greek bar staff , that I will enjoy it -even neat - for ever more).

Metaxa works particularly well in a Velvet Glove - really brings out the rosewater sort of flavours in the Metaxa.

You need Bols white Creme de Cacao though (as you do for the 20th C) - the de Kuypers version is absolute poo ! (im(not so)ho

Gethin

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Well, I have you guys to thank for putting me onto the Aviation and the Last Word, and the Orbit Room (and Gary Regan) for putting me onto the Stiletto. Those are magnificent drinks I like almost as much as:

- Sazerac

- Pegu

- French 75

- Scofflaw (rye or bourbon, dry vermouth, lemon juice, grenadine (or better yet, pom molasses), 8:4:2:1)

This last I dug out of Regan's _Joy_ when I wanted to use up a lemon half and didn't feel like an Aviation.

--

Ben


Edited by Quinapalus (log)

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It's a toss up between a well made Manhattan, probably Knob Creek if available or a Calvados Sidecar.


Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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A bourbon crusta:

Bourbon, maraschino liqueur, Cointreau, lemon juice.

Up in a sugar rimmed cocktail glass.

Perfectly balanced and perfectly autumn.

PS  Rye makes a good substitute for the bourbon if you're feeling adventurous!

hmmm... this sounds so good!

So many drinks discussed on the egullet boards that I need to try, but a good

Negroni or Sazerac is certainly at the top of my list right now.


"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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an Apple Blow Fizz made with Laird's bonded applejack.

:cool:

Two ounces of the bonded served at 82 degrees, served in a chipped broken glass, and hoisted with Pol Pot, would be good.


A DUSTY SHAKER LEADS TO A THIRSTY LIFE

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Summer: Bombay Tonic, short, with the juice of two lime wedges, heavy ice.

Winter: Bourbon Manhattan, preferably Woodford with a couple of cherries. Yeah I know what happens to the cherries before they're bottled, but they're good in that sweet plastic kinda way.

When at Earl's: Perfect Margarita. They don't have this on the menu any longer, but if you ask they may make it for you. Tequila Sauza, the yellow one, with fresh lime juice and a little apple juice with a salted rim, on the rocks. Wow.

When at Val d'Isere in Whistler: Apple Martini, made with the usual suspects, but they add a spoonful of pink lady apple puree imported from France and garnish with an apple chip. Yum.


Bob McLeod

VOX BACCULUS HIC VADIS IN VITRIO JUBILIAM

The road goes on forever and the party never ends

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I have long enjoyed a cocktail as an aperitif.

It consists of half white vermouth and half dark vermouth

on the rocks with a twist!

That is exactly how I order it.

I have engaged bar tenders and restaurant wait staff in many attempts

to discover if this concoction has a name.

There seems to be a lot of confusion.

Many bar tenders have told me there definitely is a name--something like

half and half or cin cin--but can't swear to any one specifically.

I am also told that this is rarely, if ever, ordered today.

so

Does anyone have an official name for this thing?

Is it true that this is rarely ordered today?

(I am amazed as this is a really nice cocktail--not too alcoholic and

for a wine lover like me --a nice way to begin an evening)

and

I prefer Boissiere vermouth (white and dark) are there better choices?

thanks!

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The Addington from coktaildb sounds pretty close 1/2 sweet, 1/2 dry, soda water, lemon twist. The addition of equal parts vermouth (dry/sweet) to a martini or manhattan will make it "perfect".

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I have long enjoyed a cocktail as an aperitif.

It consists of half white vermouth and half dark vermouth

on the rocks with a twist!

Many bar tenders have told me there definitely is a name--something like

half and half or cin cin--but can't swear to any one specifically.

I am also told that this is rarely, if ever, ordered today.

We call it a Moitie/Moitie (which is half/half in French) - we order it almost exclusively! Typically, outside of posh establishments, they haven't got a clue. In Quebec, however, it's a standard drink!


Chantal

www.kawarthacuisine.ca

"Where there are vines, there is civilization"

from Mondovino

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I have long enjoyed a cocktail as an aperitif.

cin cin--

[

Refers to Cinzano, the name brand of vermouth


Chantal

www.kawarthacuisine.ca

"Where there are vines, there is civilization"

from Mondovino

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I'm afraid I can't help come up with what this is called (I really like "Moitié", though!), but wanted to recommend something similar that we frequently enjoy.

It's from The Speakeasies of 1932 and was originally served at Jack's, a speakeasy in the basement of a brownstone in Greenwich Village. This version was adapted by Gary and Mardee Regan from the recipe in the book:

Vermouth Cocktail

1 ounce sweet vermouth.

1 ounce dry vermouth.

2 dashes of Angostura bitters.

2 dashes orange bitters.

2 dashes grenadine.

1 lemon twist, for garnish.

Shake all the ingredients over ice, and strain into a chilled martini glass. Add the garnish.

I'm sure this would also work well on the rocks. We like to make this with Carpano Antica Formula or Punt E Mes as the sweet vermouth. It's a knockout!

Chuck


Chuck Taggart

The Gumbo Pages, New Orleans / Los Angeles

"New Orleans food is as delicious as the less criminal forms of sin." - Mark Twain, 1884

Bia agus deoch, ceol agus craic.

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I'm afraid I can't help come up with what this is called (I really like "Moitié", though!), but wanted to recommend something similar that we frequently enjoy.

It's from The Speakeasies of 1932 and was originally served at Jack's, a speakeasy in the basement of a brownstone in Greenwich Village.  This version was adapted by Gary and Mardee Regan from the recipe in the book:

Vermouth Cocktail

1 ounce sweet vermouth.

1 ounce dry vermouth.

2 dashes of Angostura bitters.

2 dashes orange bitters.

2 dashes grenadine.

1 lemon twist, for garnish.

Shake all the ingredients over ice, and strain into a chilled martini glass. Add the garnish.

I'm sure this would also work well on the rocks.  We like to make this with Carpano Antica Formula or Punt E Mes as the sweet vermouth.  It's a knockout!

Chuck

Wow you just nailed one of my standbys, although I subtract the grenadine. What type of orange bitters are you using my choice are Gary's

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Whenever I'm in South East Asia i have in fridge passion fruit for passion fruit martini. In Europe I have to use pure.

 

3 part Vodka

1 part Passion Fruit Liqueur

1 Passion Fruit / Soft Part, don't use skin

1 Lemongrass

 

I like to add lemongrass to sweet tropical cocktails, you will get spicy note well balanced with sweetness 

 

Put all ingredients in boston shaker, muddle well add ice and shake. Strain into Martini Glass

 

 

 

 

 


How to make cocktails at home http://www.cocktail4.me

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Flop Sweat

Duo of Groupies

  • Like 2

True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

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