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bourdain

CALLING ALL MEXICANS

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I'm seeking names and restaurants of high-end/"nouvelle" Mexican chefs, operating in the USA who--unlike--say Rick Bayless and Jose Andres--are actually MEXICAN. Home grown Mexican chefs creating any variety of Mexican fusion are also of interest.

Your informed input would be much appreciated.


abourdain

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Mexican only, or are other Central Americans eligible? Hector Guerra was sous for Yannik Cam at Le Pavillion back in the Reagan administration, and played soccer and cooked with Roberto Donna for several years. He has the classic CV -- began as a dishwasher and rose through the ranks. He opened his own Salvadoran fusion place a few years back. Unfortunately, it went under and he now appers to be chef at a place called Cabanas (202) 944-4242. Given its location in a major Georgetown tourist-trap area, he may not be offering cutting-edge food at this time, but I'm sure he is still the same good chef and good guy he was back when I knew him.


I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

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Geno Bahena has a couple of places here in Chicago...Ixcapuzalco & Chilpancingo. He worked for Bayless before he opened his own places.

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One of the people who jump to mind is Hugo Ortega in Houston. Perhaps his food is a bit short of the 'high end' you were looking for, but his Hugo's is definitely white tablecloth food.


Stephen Bunge

St Paul, MN

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Chef Carlos Molina at Los Catrines-Tequila's Bar in Philadelphia.

Los Catrines & Tequila's Bar

1602 Locust Street

Philadelphia, PA 19103

(215) 546-0181


Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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Not sure if it's still there, but otherwise Arturo Franco-Camacho's Roomba in New Haven, CT. Ate there a few years ago, fairly inventive high-end (for CT standards) Latino Cuisine. I believe he's both chef and owner.

Roomba Restaurant.

1044 Chapel St.

New Haven, CT 06511

203-562-7666

Hope it helps,

Silly.


We''ve opened Pazzta 920, a fresh pasta stall in the Boqueria Market. follow the thread here.

My blog, the Adventures of A Silly Disciple.

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The former sous chef at Charlie Trotters (Guillermo Tellez) is Mexican - He's the exec at Mayya in Miami Beach. I'm pretty sure Yoel Cruz of North Square on Waverly place is Mexican as well - that's all I got.


Edited by GordonCooks (log)

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Freddy Sanchez of Adobo Grill, Chicago. He was born in Guerrero and raised in Acapulco, Mexico. where he experienced the tantalizing sights and smells of the coastal city. Tribune critic Phil Vettel wrote in October: "ADOBO GRILL, 1610 N. Wells St., 312-266-7999. The considerable promise of this Old Town restaurant has been met by chef Freddy Sanchez, who is producing some of the best Mexican cooking in town, and a greatly improved front-room staff. The beverage program, which includes stellar margaritas along with a monthly tequila tasting event, is a big plus. Recommended: Ceviche assortment, guacamole (prepared tableside), tilapia with mushroom escabeche, venison tampiqueno. Open: Dinner Mon.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Entree prices: $12.95-$24.95. Credit cards: A, DC, M, V. Reservations: Strongly recommended. Noise: Conversation-friendly. Other: Wheelchair accessible, valet parking, smoking at bar only. (star)(star)(star)"


Bill Daley

Chicago Tribune

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Luchita's in Cleveland is one of my favorites.

3456 W. 117th St., Cleveland, OH 44111; Phone is 216.252.1169.

The chef is named Rey Galindo.

Make Ruhlman buy you a couple of Cuervo Margueritas there when you come to town. :raz:

Laurie

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Geno Bahena has a couple of places here in Chicago...Ixcapuzalco & Chilpancingo.

Probably because I live in Chicago, but Geno Bahena is the first guy that came to miund when I saw this thread. Ixcapuzalco rules.

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"miguel ravago at fonda san miguel in austin might fit the bill"

I second the motion on Miguel Ravago at Fonda. Ravago and of note, his Mexicano kitchen team who have all been there from day one. They all rock!

Also, an ex from Fonda, is Roberto Santibanez who is running the show at Rosa Mexicano in New York. He is a gifted chef and excellent teacher.

Salud,

Shelora

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Mariano Rivera chef at Charlies on Leavitt, Chicago

Francisco Lopez, sous chef, The Everest Room, Chicago


Patrick Sheerin

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Richard Sandoval of Maya/San Francisco, Pampano/New York and Tamayo/Denver is from Acapulco.

He also has a Mexican-Asian fusion restaurant in Denver called Zengo.


“When I was dating and the wine list was presented to my male companion, I tried to ignore this unfortunate faux pas. But this practice still goes on…Closing note to all servers and sommeliers: please include women in wine selection. Okay?”--Alpana Singh, M.S.-"Alpana Pours"

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http://www.eastbysouthwest.com

I worked for Sergio in Telluride, Co. There, Eagles Bar and Grille, he did alot of fusion stuff (Latin and Asian). His wife and him now own a sushi restaraunt in Durango, CO.

Not sure if this helped, but now ya know.

LJ


R.I.P.

Johnny Ramone

1948-2004

www.RAMONES.com

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Chef Suzana Davila at the Café Poca Cosa in Tucson Arizona. Not only does she make amazing margaritas and heavenly authentic mexican food, she is the damned sexiest grandmother in the world with a 1000 watt smile and overflowing generosity.

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Check out the food section of today's L.A. Times (12/22) for a review of La Huasteca in Lynwood (part of metropolitan LA). The chef-owner is Alfonso Ramirez, originally from Puebla. Definitely not the usual Tex-Mex cuisine. (Sorry, I don't know how to post the link.)

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Julian Medina. Sandoval's former right hand, worked at Sandoval's restaurants for years (he brought Julian to the US). very talented, he's now at Zocalo uptown


Alcohol is a misunderstood vitamin.

P.G. Wodehouse

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