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percyn

Breakfast! The most important meal of the day (2004-2011)

3,317 posts in this topic

For breakfast this morning, Mr. Kim had a lamb hash redo and I had fried egg, bacon, hash browns w/ onion, tomato (CSA box heirloom) and toasted baguette:

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That was at 9:30 – I didn’t get hungry again until 3pm!

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Poached farm egg, pan-fried potatoes with Indian spices (ghee; 3 Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and thinly sliced; 1 plum tomato, diced; yellow mustard seeds; curry leaves; salt; 1 Thai chile, seeded and minced; turmeric; asafoetida) and summer chopped salad (cantaloupe, heirloom tomatoes, Sungold cherry tomatoes, apricot, scallion, mint, a scant pinch of sea salt and 2 tablespoons lime juice).

Potatoes were inspired by Monica Bhide's blog post on fried eggs and potato chips -- http://www.monicabhide.com/my_weblog/2010/06/once-upon-a-story-fried-eggs-on-potato-chips.html


Edited by SobaAddict70 (log)

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Tortilla with potatos, andouille sausage (since I had no chorizo at home) and eggs.

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Plated with tomatos, sourdough toast, and another dollop of fig jam. About time for figs to come in, too; can't wait!

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Sorry for washed-out photos. Not sure what happened there.


Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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today it was up at 615. had a macaroni cheese in the oven by seven and had some for breakfast at 8am. the extra macaroni became macaroni salad that will have tuna added to it for a cold salad lunch. really hot so i get up, clean, do chores and cook before the heat of the day then downstairs in the cooler part of the house from 2-7.

picked up some mince that i will probably make into some chili for tomorrow morning and then reheat for friday am.

am single until late sunday. have to think about what is in the farmers market to make for lunches/dinners for next week for us.


Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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Egg salad (eggs, cheese, mayo, Worcestershire, Dijon mustard, Tabasco) on sourdough, broiled:

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Earlier, quiche with sausage, asparagus, and goat's milk and cow's milk farmers' cheese.

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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That broiled egg salad is something I have never seen but it is speaking to me.

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That broiled egg salad is something I have never seen but it is speaking to me.

The recipe I sorta-kinda followed called for bacon, but I didn't do that. Any egg salad, minus the minced pickles and plus some grated cheese, should work well. First time I'd ever tried it, but it won't be the last.


Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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kayb – beautiful tortilla and quiche! And I’m going to be trying that broiled egg salad, too. What a great idea! I often eat a sliced hard boiled egg sandwich made with still hot eggs and cheese that gets squooshy from the hot eggs. Same principle, I guess.

Breakfast yesterday morning:

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The French toast was made with the wonderful crusty loaf that we got in Friday’s CSA box. Perfect. Also Benton bacon and cantaloupe.

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I don't have a great camera, or photography/plating skills, but the food is usually delicious.

I rarely eat breakfast but thought this was worth sharing. It's a bacon, Italian sausage and spinach risotto topped with a 64.5 degree egg. It was delicious.

bplRC.jpg

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Phaz, welcome to the thread! And your photography skills look just fine to me.

Have you tried scrambled eggs made in a water bath (in a sous vide bag of course)?

Thanks!

I did try scrambled eggs just after I got my SVS but got a little carried away with the truffle oil and it kind of turned me off of it. That's a good reminder to try again though, it certainly had potential. I should do some research on good recipes/techniques.

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Corned beef hash (from my first attempt at homemade corned beef!), double-yolked fried egg, cantaloupe.


Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Breakfast yesterday was a few half-rashers of bacon, eggs scrambled in the bacon fat, and some pan-toast with butter, all done in my new 10" cast-iron skillet. Dr. Pepper on ice (something I'm really starting to enjoy) to top it off, and we had it made.


"...which usually means underflavored, undersalted modern French cooking hidden under edible flowers and Mexican fruits."

- Jeffrey Steingarten, in reference to "California Cuisine".

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Here is how I made my sous vide scrambled eggs.

How long does it take to cook them at 72 degrees? Do you ever add anything besides half and half to the bag, or do you wait to add any chives/butter/etc when they are done? Do you have to mix them during cooking at all like other methods I've seen?

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Phaz, bag only contained eggs, a touch of half and half and maybe a touch of butter (can't recall).

Its usually done in 15-20 minutes. I was experimenting with lower temps and slowing raising it. You can stir or shake the bag a couple times through the process but this can also be done towards the end.

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Phaz – that looks and sounds fantastic

percyn – that is a beautiful biscuit! Was it just a drop biscuit or was there something in it?

kayb – yay on the homemade corned beef!

Both of those omelets look wonderful – I especially like the idea of an unrolled one, since I am not to great at rolling!

Mr. Kim’s birthday breakfast this morning:

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French toast, sage sausage and scrambled eggs w/ goat cheese and chives

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Thanks Kim. I rolled that first omelette too soon, but the non-folding one is definitely easier to not mess up. I must practice patience!

Today we had Shirred Eggs. I had more of the diced ham to use up so put some on the bottom of the buttered ramekins, added two eggs each, salt and pepper and baked at 375F for about eight minutes. Added the cream, cheeses, chives and parsley and baked another ten minutes. We had them with toasted English muffins. :wub:

ShirredEggs.jpg

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