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Fergus Henderson's "Nose to Tail" Cookbook


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For what it's worth, we had the turnip bake from "The Whole Beast" last night and -- while it could be argued that anything tastes good with enough butter and slow-rasted onions added to it -- we now have proof that even vegetarians can get good eating out of Henderson's book. Rounds of turnip were cooked on a small iron skillet, with the onions and butter, the result being something that looked a lot like Pommes Anna and tasted delicious.

Edited by Busboy (log)

I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

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We hunted up a butcher’s stall that offered fresh tails at DC’s Eastern Market and stashed the tails in the ‘fridge, pointlessly lobbying the children to join us in the feast-to-be and, by chance, hunting up this video on the Internet.

In the video, Fergus himself walks the viewer through the magic that is Crispy Pig’s Tails, whilst an interviewer – insensitive even by my standards – queries him about Parkinson’s and some gangly junkie-ass assistant whisks mustard into the eggs and does a little behind-the-line minuet with Chef Henderson. 

Great stuff, Busboy. Thanks.

And thanks for the video link. I was a bit surprised that bourdain didn't clock that wench that was harassing (patiient and kind) Chef Henderson.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

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Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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After exactly one attempt at these, this is my thought.

I think the breading is more about texture than anything; how you add a little crunch to the oink is negotiable.

The drawback to frying, I suspect, would be taste and texture. Although they aren't quite as fatty as pork belly, imagine deep frying strips of uncured bacon and you get some idea what deep fried pig tails might be like. Also, roasting both cuts the richness -- melding the fat and meat somehow -- and adds another layer of depth and taste.

I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

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  • 2 months later...

Had the pig tails in question at St. John's, and very nice they were too. Gelatinous and crunchy and fatty, striated with that lovely meat.

Edited by MobyP (log)

"Gimme a pig's foot, and a bottle of beer..." Bessie Smith

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Alas, no pig tails on my visit last friday. I don't think we ate anything from the cookbook at all. Dishes included:

Spleen with Bacon

Sprats

Potato and Fatback soup

Terrine (no description given. just 'terrine')

Ox Heart

Venison Liver

Pork Shoulder (with a generous helping of cracklings!)

Snipe

All fantastic, though the soup was so heavy we would've preferred a smaller portion.

I'll be going back in two weeks, when the mission will be to eat as much from the cookbook as we can.

Oh, and we had a bonus Salmon Rushdie sighting as we were being seated. I don't know why I get a thrill out of seeing literary celebs rather than actors or musicians, but I do.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I am very upset...I loaned my copy to my boss so that he could check it out....and now he's had it for over 6 months!!!!! I haven't even had a chance to cook anything out of it! It was a gift.....GGGRRRR!

He did buy me a Careme book for christmas though....

Time to bring it up again...

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I am very upset...I loaned my copy to my boss so that he could check it out....and now he's had it for over 6 months!!!!!  I haven't even had a chance to cook anything out of it!  It was a gift.....GGGRRRR!

He did buy me a Careme book for christmas though....

Time to bring it up again...

You know, there are some things that are forgiveable. Holding on to a prized cookbook BEFORE you get a chance to use it, never :shock: I split up with a guy who I had loaned one of my Bourdain books and the first thing I did, had him drive over to my place with the book.

Good luck getting it back :biggrin:

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  • 2 weeks later...

The only thing I've had a chance to make from this so far is duck legs with carrots, and it was just fantastic. The skin was delightfully crispy, the meat nice and tender. The carrots, having soaked up so much of the duck fat, had a flavor and texture akin to butter.

It was also frightfully easy to make.

I want to get into pig's tails and ears, but I can't get that stuff around here. I've found all of it and more in Boston, but the people I stay with there are, shall we say, unadventurous in their eating and won't let me bring such things into their kitchen.

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I've tried corning my own beef brisket for the the boiled beef with dumplings recipe. Although the flavour was excellent, the texture of the beef was a bit off (somewhat stringy/dry). Any one know why that might be? My best guess is either I didn't cook it long enough or the brisket was too lean.

GordonD, I pity the people you stay with! I've had a fair bit of luck coaxing my family into trying some new stuff, it just takes a lot of persistence :laugh:

Martin Mallet

<i>Poor but not starving student</i>

www.malletoyster.com

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  • 1 month later...

What a perfect topic to make my first post in!

I bought the book after reading Bourdains " A cooks tour". Im an apprentice cook here in Norway and I found something Ive been missing in that book. Norway used to be a poor country before we found our oil, so this book could easily reflect our own culinary history, but alas, the only place youll find offal and variety meats is in the sausages and meatpuddings at the butcher. Im now officially on a mission to lead the norwegian people back on track to savour the whole beast.

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Good work Christopher.

Good luck.

Make a trip to London on Ryanair and eat there first. Or twice, or thrice.

"Coffee and cigarettes... the breakfast of champions!"

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don't forget St John BRead & Wine. lighter offerings, but just as EXCELLENT.

I'll have to ask my Norwegian friend about offal. She hates the stuff.

"Coffee and cigarettes... the breakfast of champions!"

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  • 1 month later...

I will be dining at St'John late May and can't wait. I made the coppa from the book and it was amazing.

Last time I was in London I wanted to go there but I blew my budget at Hospital Rd so all I could afford was a bacon sarnie at St'John Bread and Wine. Ha!

I can still taste it now.

Edited by RooStew (log)
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  • 1 month later...

This thread and Janet Zimmerman's article on the front page sure make me want to look up that recipe for Bone Marrow in my copy of Fergus!

This thread reminds me of Anissa Helou's new book, The Fifth Quarter, all about offal. I ordered it from Amazon. It was supposed to be published in April, and now they list July. I sure hope it does come out then!

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A modest waning: Had Fergus' brined pork belly the other day and it struck us significantly ovrsalted. Edible, but salty almost to the point of a proscuitto or Virginia ham -- more of a flavoring agent than something you'd necessarily want to eat big dollops of. And good enough that we'll likely try it again, with less salt in the brine this time.

I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

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  • 4 weeks later...
This thread and Janet Zimmerman's article on the front page sure make me want to look up that recipe for Bone Marrow in my copy of Fergus!

This thread reminds me of Anissa Helou's new book, The Fifth Quarter, all about offal.  I ordered it from Amazon.  It was supposed to be published in April, and now they list July.  I sure hope it does come out then!

hi, i just wanted to tell you that you'd be better off ordering my book from amazon.co.uk as i don't think the information on amazon.com is quite correct. or you can order it direct from my english publishers, absolute press. i think you can do it through their website. hope you enjoy it. :wub:

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Yes, welcome aboard indeed! I've just finished your "Mediterranean Street Food" and enjoyed it tremendously. Of course, as a confirmed offal lover in a household of confirmed offal haters, your new one will be a bittersweet read...

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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