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bourdain

Fergus Henderson's "Nose to Tail" Cookbook

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THE WHOLE BEAST: Nose To Tail Eating( Ecco), the legendary cult classic from St John's Fergus Henderson will be released March 30th. Brit reprint coming as well.

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Excellent. Fergus Henderson is a saint of the fifth quarter and the highest water.

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I'll be in London next week and sampling Fergus/St John for the first time. Has anyone been of late and, if so, what are the current absolute musts on the menu?

I'll pick up a copy over there.


Edited by kitwilliams (log)

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Ooh, that's earlier than I expected. Great! It's really a delight, both for the recipes and for Fergus's voice. :wub:

kitwilliams: you might not be able to; it's been almost impossible to find there! But if you get a copy, let us know, please.

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After searching for about 3 months I bought a copy online in December. Paid about $40 plus shippping from UK.

I was at the restaurant last summer and actually got to browse the kitchen copy which gave me great delight. Many modifications and smudges !!!

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I ate there January 6.

If the salad of pork cheeks and dandelion is still on the menu, try it.

Everything is good ( altho the prime rib wasn't nearly as good as the cut we get here in Texas....)

Devilled kidneys were a treat, as well.

And the desserts are fantastic!

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This is great news. St. John is my favorite London restaurant.

Bruce

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Here is a link to the Q&A that Fergus did here last March.

His answers were very brief but generous and kind. He has been ill and someone was typing them in for him.

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Writing an intro for this book was perhaps the single proudest accomplishment of my life. I cherish basking in Fergus' reflected glory.

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Rachel,

Thanks for the amazon link...just ordered a copy and found a used Cooking by Hand (Bertolli's new book) for about $14.

And in an ironical twist, I'm sitting in a Borders in LA (Orange Co, actually) using the t-mobile hotspot service for the first time...which works very well on my new PB G4.

Jim

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Can't wait! (Although I'm not completely sure I could tackle it without my mother.)

You know, for a while in college, I was beginning to believe I was the only person (of my US friends at least) that grew up eating organ meat!

SML

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Writing an intro for this book was perhaps the single proudest accomplishment of my life. I cherish basking in Fergus' reflected glory.

Hey, it's probably your best writing ever. IIRC, the spelling and grammar required very little fixing. :raz:

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Writing an intro for this book was perhaps the single proudest accomplishment of my life. I cherish basking in Fergus' reflected glory.

I know what you mean. I really enjoy writing introductions for books I'm glad to see published.

Bruce

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Dropping in at St. John Bread and Wine yields the sort of fairly priced high quality snacking at odd hours that used to be typical of certain French bistros and brasseries and is becoming increasingly rare. My wife and I shared a suet pudding which she declared to have a crust superior to what her mother in Lincolnshire had made, and her mother (in my experience) was a damn fine traditional English cook.

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I definately have to get this one!

After watching AB's "Cook's Tour" Fergus episode, I went out, bought, and slowly roasted a bunch of beef marrow bones. My mom stopped by just in time to share them with me and we used tiny baby spoons to spread the marrow on toasted homemade bread, and sprinkled a bit of sea salt and fresh ground pepper on top.

Yes Tony, it's the "butter of the gods"! Anyway, we felt very posh!

(I'll hide the book when my vegetarian sister comes to visit!) She has her faults, but I still love her. :biggrin:

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Reprinted from email newsletter I received today FYI:

RELEASE DATES AND ADVANCE ORDERS.

The American version of the book, re-titled The Whole Beast will be available in bookshops in the U.S. from 1st April 2004 with a British release later in the year under it's original title. However you can pre-order the American version on Amazon.com now. Visit the book section of the site and click on the link to take you directly to the book's page on the Amazon site.

As yet we don't have a firm date for the U.K. issue, which will be an almost exact re-print of the original version but with new photographs by the original photographer Jason Lowe. As soon as there is a date and a pre-order page on Amazon we will post links from the books page.

AMERICAN EVENTS.

During April 2004 Fergus Henderson and our Head Chef Edwin Lewis will be visiting the U.S. in preperation for the books' U.S. release and during the visit will undertake a variety of events, including book signings and demonstrations that readers are more than welcome to attend.

Listed below are some of the public appearances confirmed so far, as more are arranged we will post them up on the site. Sadly at this time we don't have much more information regarding the events, and so we would suggest contacting the venues below to find out more.

08/04/04 DALLAS - FORT WORTH MUSEUM OF ART

12/04/04 SAN FRANSICO - CHEZ PANISSE

13/04/04 LOS ANGELES - CIUDAD RESTAURANT

14/04/04 LOS ANGELES - GETTY CENTRE MUSEUM

15/04/04 CHICAGO - CHARLIE TROTTERS TO GO

16/04/04 CHICAGO - ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO

20/04/04 NEW YORK - SPOTTED PIG RESTAURANT

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Mrs Woman

Please consider adding New Orleans to the list. I could provide a space filled with local art for a signing and know several people who own indie book stores. I would be delighted to provide complimentary dinners and could help find reasonable lodging. April is a beautiful month to visit the Crescent City!

Lafcadio

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I just put in my order for one as well...now I have to patiently wait till April!! Too bad there are no Hardcover editions though, only paperback.

Elie

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It's all very well for AB to alert us to 'The Most Important Publishing Event EVER', but why is he being so modest about another of this year's publishing events - namely, the Les Halles Cook Book? Got a date for us Tony?

BTW - anybody any idea why Fergus Henderson's book needs to be re-titled for the US market? The original sounded fine to me. Are those darned marketing people to be blamed again?

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