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What Are You Reading?


woodford
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Jeffery Steingarten-The Man Who Ate Everything

Just reread A. Bourdain's Kitchen Confidential in my continuing quest to keep from doing something stupid (again....for the third time.....must not do it.......need a life.......need my wife......aaaaghaghahagha!).

Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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Skimmed Nigel Slater's Appetite, a Christmas present. A lovely looking book, but pretty basic.

A few pages into Michael Bond's Monsieur Pamplemousse Omnibus, about a former Surete detective who is now a gourmand and inspector for a Michelin-like restaurant rating company.

Arthur Johnson, aka "fresco"
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"The Lewis and Clark Cookbook" by Leslie Mansfield.2002

"The Food Journal of Lewis and Clark; Recipes for an Expedition" by Mary Gunderson.2003

Okay, so everybody up here is gaa gaa about all this stuff coming up.

My little ol' landlady got them for me.

Edited by Mabelline (log)
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I am reading "Fast Food Nation" by, Eric Schlosser.

It is a little politically slanted in my opinion….But you know about opinions, there like assholes ect. ect.

A-n-y-way, after the recent headlines it’s apparent that the meat packing industry needs another overhaul.

:shock::shock::shock:

WELCOME TO "THE JUNGLE"

Edited by chefreit (log)

I Will Be..................

"The Next Food Network Star!"

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I'm gonna harp on this some more as it was my most favoritest book in the genre of B's Kitchen Confidential. Cosmopolitan: A Bartender's Life by Toby Cecchini is discussed a bit over here.. This is required reading for anyone that remotely liked KC. My only criticism is that there were too many 7+ letter words. Jeez, a bartender with a brain.

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I'm reading Russ Parson's How to Read a French Fry. It's fascinating stuff. I keep reading sections out loud to Blovie.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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"The Lewis and Clark Cookbook" by Leslie Mansfield.2002

"The Food Journal of Lewis and Clark; Recipes for an Expedition" by Mary Gunderson.2003

Okay, so everybody up here is gaa gaa about all this stuff coming up.

My little ol' landlady got them for me.

Which of these books do you like the best? They look fascinating.

(I hate these threads. I get a twitch on the mouse button to go to Amazon.)

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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Definitely the Leslie Mansfield. Although they are both good, the Mansfield work is far more detailed. Mary Gunderson's is good for using quotes from the journal and then aligning them with a recipe. "Buffalo Boudin Blanc" in the style of Sacajawea's hubby, Toussaint Charbonneau- sorry, I love that name- had to stick it in somehow. Anyway, most of the recipes in both books are moderned up, so you'll cook them. :smile:

Edited by Mabelline (log)
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"The Lewis and Clark Cookbook" by Leslie Mansfield.2002

"The Food Journal of Lewis and Clark; Recipes for an Expedition" by Mary Gunderson.2003

Okay, so everybody up here is gaa gaa about all this stuff coming up.

My little ol' landlady got them for me.

Which of these books do you like the best? They look fascinating.

(I hate these threads. I get a twitch on the mouse button to go to Amazon.)

fifi - twitch and check your local library's card catalog. if they don't have it ask for an interlibrary loan and if you really like it then buy it. i do it all the time

at present no food reading except for old copies of food mags from work which, after i finish reading, go back to the library for sale. in the last month did read cosmopolitan by toby cecchini and thought it was a brilliant book. also read rob walsh's book and think him in some ways superior to steingarten. his essay on soul food in prison (angola) really tied into the food in prison and as punishment thread.

tangentially just started "under the peacock fan" about 4 women who followed their husbands/siblings to india under the raj. they had to adapt full georgian/victorian sensibilities to a new land and deal with holding banquets/durbars/at homes, etc. and all associated food/drink working with an interesting palate of foods

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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fifi - twitch and check your local library's card catalog. if they don't have it ask for an interlibrary loan and if you really like it then buy it. i do it all the time

Definitely! If I had to pay for even 10% of the books I read, I would go bankrupt. It's a great resource for those of us who have more curiosity than cash.

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Just released Feast - A History of Grand Eating by Victoria & Albert Museum Director, Roy Strong.

Just started it, but was immediately drawn to its lush cover and the fact that it is well-illustrated.

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A huge haul from the library:

Jacques Pepin Celebrates

How to be a Domestic Goddess (Nigella Lawson). Her books always surprise me. Just returned "Forever Summer" and was so happy to see that she was not on the Alice Water's bandwagon. We don't all live in areas where it is forever summer and if I were to try and eat locally and seasonally now my diet would consist of snow cones and pine needles. Sometimes you have to make the best of what's available.

China Moon Cookbook by Barbara Tropp

Two by Donna Hay: Classics Book 1 and New Food Fast

The New Book of Middle Eastern Food by Claudia Rodin - made her first recipe -- Dukkah-- and am totally hooked on the stuff!

Our library ususally limits us to two books on a subject but they are more lenient with cookbooks and I hauled The Dane along and made him sign out 3 books on his card!

Then picked up 3 more books at a charity shop: The Moosewood Restaurant Daily Special; Dinners for Two by Sharon O'Connor (Recipes from Romantic Country Inns); and Magnificient Salads (a promotional book from the GWA Group - no idea who they are).

I treat them all like a marvellous buffet and dip in and out of them as the mood swings making notes and tagging pages with sticky notes for later transcribing.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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...at a charity shop:  Dinners for Two by Sharon O'Connor (Recipes from Romantic Country Inns)

Anna, What a coincidence! An organization I belong to runs an annual used book sale. (It's our major fund raiser.) During the year, we members sort the books and have first dibs on what comes in. Two weeks ago, I took home the very same Dinners for Two. :laugh:

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