Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Yellow and white cakes


Wendy DeBord
 Share

Recommended Posts

Can you share, iii_bake? PM me if that's what you want. Thanks!

I might have been blurred.

I mentioned this once on page 3.

The recipe was also posted ...# 82, i think.

Please let me knoiw what you think of it once you bake.

Ciao,

iii

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

I have been reading this post in search of the best (subjective, I know) yellow cake recipe to make with chocolate frosting for an upcoming birthday. Anyone baked a yellow cake lately and want to chime in and vote for a new or old favorite?

Aria in Oregon

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have been reading this post in search of the best (subjective, I know) yellow cake recipe to make with chocolate frosting for an upcoming birthday.   Anyone baked a yellow cake lately and want to chime in and vote for a new or old favorite?

I've tried baking several different recipes but my favourite and always successful one is the Golden Butter Cake from Whimsical Bakehouse. I made it again just 2 weeks ago. This time 4 layers filled and frosted with 7-minute frosting. Large ribbon coconut coating the sides. It's very versatile. I can PM it to you if you like. I'm happy with the flavour, texture & sweetness and it always gets rave reviews.

Edited by CanadianBakin' (log)

Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
I don't have a recipe, but have you tried using sponge cakes?  You can make them moist with the addition of simple syrup and Layer with buttercream, then you have your butter taste/feel with the moist factor.

MMmm.... I love sponge cakes... that sounds tasty!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
I decided that I would substitute some of the butter in a standard white cake recipe with vegetable oil to see if that would help. Based on results posted in this thread and other sites, I chose the Cook's Illustrated basic White Layer Cake recipe to adapt. The only changes I made were to replace the almond extract with vanilla, and replace 1/3 of the butter with oil. This cake was a delight! I froze it immediately out of the oven and then thawed it to see what the texture would be like, and it was lovely. It was not at all dense, had some spring to it, and the crumb was very fine. It cut like a dream, too. The flavor was very good, in fact, my husband and I inhaled the test pieces - and I don't even really like cake! I am so excited; I thought I was going to have to resort to a boxed mix to get the texture I was after.

Darcie,

I baked my first ever white cake using this exact recipe -- Baker's Illustrated -- and substituting 1/3 of the butter with vegetable oil, and it was really, really good! I used 1 teaspoon of clear vanilla extract, 1 teaspoon of regular (Madagascar Bourbon) vanilla extract and a teensy droplet of fiori di Sicilia, which I also added to the buttercream. I schmeared some raspberry bakery jam in between along with the buttercream and, since the iced cake look it was coated in plain butter (boy, do I need a good buttercream recipe), drizzled some jam on top as well. Pretty darn good, considering it contained no chocolate. And moist, in and out of the fridge. I'm going to try converting some of my other butter cake recipes using your method. Thank you so much for the idea!

-- Lisa

Edited by abooja (log)
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 years later...

I'm not Wendy--And I did not re-read and catch up on this complete thread.

But to answer your guestion, Ksaw, Sylvia Weinstock's yellow cake is excellent. It comes out pretty white in color-- I tweak it when I make it and I use two whole eggs and two egg whites and I use a guarter cup more flour. I just add the eggs to the creamed sugar & butter--it would probably be fluffier if I whipped them etc. but the thought of the potential of tasting egg white in my cake prevents me from going this route for a wedding cake. You can google Sylvia Weinstock's yellow cake.

I would not chill this cake because it does not relax all the way back to perfect texture when it does get to room temp. And often wedding cake needs to be put in the frige for the sake of a filling or whatever so this is not a super efficient work horse type cake but if kept at room temp it is excellent. It obviously works for Sylvia!!

Another idea for a wedding cake that is a nice resilient cake that can take the job description for what is demanded of a white wedding cake uses cake mix as a base. It's one box of cake mix, 1 cup of sugar, 1 cup of self rising flour, flavoring, quarter cup of oil, 4 egg whites (I add a yolk or two), one and a third cups water, one cup of sour cream. This makes about 7 cups of batter.

You making your own bridal cake? How many people will be attending?

Some cake ideas for you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

See you can make a great cake from scratch but a wedding cake is very different than any other random cake. I mean anyone can toss ingredients together and bake that off and viola make a tasty cake.

But wedding cake has to be versatile and work hard for you. It has to be made in advance enough so that it can be decorated and still be fresh and tasty. So it has to have shelf life, aka freezer & frige life has to withstand the time to decorate it and retain pinpoint accuracy for freshness, has to slice very well, hold up to the delivery, and icing and etc.

It's not cool for cut slices to get a stale dry edge while the sliced cake might sit out on plates at the reception for a few hours during the celebrating. For delivery a chilled cake is a happy cake in my opinion. It gets hot in Memphis--I use all butter icing so you've got to be careful.

The only cake I know of that can do all those things ^^^ is with a cake mix base.

It's not at all just about "a cake formula" kwim. But these are my opinions we all have different outlooks on this subject.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the info K8memphis. This helps alot. I'm not making cakes for myself, I make celebration cakes for a living and was on the hunt for the perfect from scratch cake recipe. I have tried the cake mix recipe and liked it, and wondered if a from scratch recipe could duplicate the taste, texture and duribilty of the aforementioned. I shall keep ur recipe at close arms length as I will be making a batch of cakes this weekend.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Now, I bought the Jilk cake emulsifier product from Albert Uster--the special ingredient in cake mix. Therefore I can bake a so called 'scratch' cake using the individual ingredients that are found in cake mix.

I've used it maybe three times in tests. So far I'm not crazy about my results, but I'll still keep testing it. To me so far it would be easier to add cake mix as an ingredient than to use this product.

For example, use the Sylvia recipe or any tried & true recipe & sub a cup of flour for a cup of cake mix--so you can try & latch onto the durability factor provided so efficiently in cake mix. But I haven't tested that out--I'm just saying you would handily have a better product, better texture than the results I'm getting with the Jilk. So I'll keep trying the Jilk because it cost me $50 but...cake mix already has it beat without testing...well because Betty C & friends have been testing for decades huh.

I made the exact recipe Albert Uster gave for the Jilk, it was horrible. Yes I might have blown it somehow but, dude, I've been baking for about 50 years, professionally for over 35. Then I started to tweak it into my recipes. I mean there's a result you get in white cake mix cakes that Humpty can't quite get together again.

Other flavors are much easier to make 'from scratch'.

But Duncan's just got the goods on white cake mix.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 12 years later...

I just used this yellow cake recipe for my birthday cake yesterday, and it was surprisingly good. I tweaked the method slightly to follow a reverse creaming method more precisely. The result was light, fluffy, and moist - but still held up to an old-fashioned cooked caramel icing.

 

2 1/4 cups all-purpose flour (do not sift the flour)
1 1/2 cups granulated sugar
3 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1-teaspoon salt
1 1/4 cups milk
Vegetable oil
1 stick butter (not margarine), softened
1-tablespoon vanilla extract
3 large eggs

 

350° oven

 

  1. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the sugar, flour, baking powder, and salt.
  2. Add the butter and beat on low until the mixture looks sandy (paddle attachment)
  3. (Measure the 1-1/4 cups of milk in a 2 cup measuring cup….then add enough vegetable oil to bring the liquid up to 1-1/3 cups)
  4. Add the milk/oil and vanilla. Mix for about a minute (1/2 on low, 1/2 on medium). Scrape bowl
  5. Add eggs 1 at a time beating and scraping as you go - about 2 minutes all told
  6. After 1 last scrape, beat for another 30 secs on med-high
  7. Bake 20 to 25 minutes

 

Then I iced with a cooked caramel icing (start with a dry caramel, then boil with cream, sugar, and a little apple cider vinegar)

 

CaramelCake.jpg

Screen Shot 2022-03-28 at 10.37.47 AM.png

CaramelCakeCrumb.jpg

Edited by mmlstarr (log)
  • Like 2
  • Delicious 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

33 minutes ago, mmlstarr said:

I just used this yellow cake recipe for my birthday cake yesterday, and it was surprisingly good. I tweaked the method slightly to folowo a reverse creaming method more precisely. The result was light, fluffy, and moist - but still held up to an old-fashioned cooked caramel icing.

 

2 1/4 cups all-purpose flour (do not sift the flour)
1 1/2 cups granulated sugar
3 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1-teaspoon salt
1 1/4 cups milk
Vegetable oil
1 stick butter (not margarine), softened
1-tablespoon vanilla extract
3 large eggs

Preheat oven to 350°

Cut wax paper to fit the bottom of (3) 9 x 1 1/2-inch round pans. Spray the pans with cooking spray, place the wax paper in the pans and spray the paper.
  1. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the sugar, flour, baking powder, and salt.

  2. Add the butter and beat with an electric mixer at low speed, until the mixture looks sandy.

    (Measure the 1-1/4 cups of milk in a 2 cup measuring cup….then add enough vegetable oil to bring the liquid up to 1-1/3 cups)
  3. Add the milk/oil and vanilla, all at once. Mix at low speed for 30 seconds, then increase the speed to medium and beat for 30 seconds.

  4. Scrape the bottom and sides of the mixing bowl.

  5. With the mixer running at low speed, add 1 egg. Increase the speed to medium and beat for 30 seconds.

  6. Repeat this procedure with the second egg. Continue adding the eggs, scraping after each addition, until all 4 are added.

  7. After the last egg is added, scrape the bowl once more, then beat at medium-high speed for 30 more seconds.

8. Bake at 350° for 20 to 25 minutes or until a wooden pick inserted near center of cake comes out clean, or until cake springs back when touched lightly in the center.
Cool cakes on wire racks for 15 minutes; remove from pans and cool completely.
 
Then I iced with a cooked caramel icing (start with a dry caramel, then boil with cream, sugar, and a little apple cider vinegar)

 

CaramelCake.jpg

Screen Shot 2022-03-28 at 10.37.47 AM.png

Thanks for posting this!  If it's not too late, I'd love to see a picture of the inside of the cake - perhaps a close up of the crumb?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 minutes ago, Kim Shook said:

Thanks for posting this!  If it's not too late, I'd love to see a picture of the inside of the cake - perhaps a close up of the crumb?

 

CaramelCakeCrumb.jpg

  • Thanks 1
  • Delicious 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...