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TDG: The Ravishing Radish Sandwich


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Kara Newman does radishes.

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Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
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I like a little squeeze of lemon juice on a radish sandwich.

More radish miscellany: the word isn't from Greek, it's from the Latin word for "root." And radishes were used (in a pretty obscene way) to punish adulterers in ancient Athens.

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Radish sandwiches are sublime.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

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Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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Am I the only one who had to look up eructation?

There's a taco cart here that has radishes as a garnish. No cheese, lettuce, or tomato. Just radishes, onions, cilantro, and lime wedges.

I've always had my sandwiches with butter and salt but that goat cheese variation sounds even better.

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Am I the only one who had to look up eructation?
The only reason I didn't have to look it up is because I'm a crossword fanatic, and it's a fairly common clue or answer in the puzzles.
There's a taco cart here that has radishes as a garnish.  No cheese, lettuce, or tomato.  Just radishes, onions, cilantro, and lime wedges.
Cheese, lettuce, and tomato are pretty much Americanized taco condiments (with the exception of some cheeses); radishes, onions, cilantro, and lime are typically Mexican.
I've always had my sandwiches with butter and salt but that goat cheese variation sounds even better.
Doesn't it though??!? Got some French Breakfast and little Black Plum radishes at the farmers' market this afternoon, and I have fresh Cypress Grove chevre in the fridge -- it's time for tea!
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More radish miscellany:  the word isn't from Greek, it's from the Latin word for "root."  And radishes were used (in a pretty obscene way) to punish adulterers in ancient Athens.

My fault. In editing, I incorrectly modified that sentence because I didn't understand the distinction between the common name and the technical term. Apparently it's the scientific name that comes from the Greek "raphanos," whearas the actual word "radish" comes from Latin.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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Got some French Breakfast and little Black Plum radishes at the farmers' market this afternoon, and I have fresh Cypress Grove chevre in the fridge -- it's time for tea!

I've never seen or heard of black plum radishes (I wonder if it's the same as black radishes, only smaller?? is this a regional specialty?) Must get my hands on some of those!

I do love that we've got a radish sandwich renaissance going on among eGulleteers! I think I'll be having one for lunch today myself...

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Years ago, I used to get a sandwich at a lunch place that I frequented that contained radish sprouts as a garnish. I generally loathe sprouts, but the radish ones were fantastic -- added an undercurrent of spice.

Edit: spelling

Edited by JAZ (log)
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Arghhhhh! Please don't misuse "British-high-tea" so as confuse people into thinking that it is the genteel afternoon pastime of eating finger sandwiches, sipping tea and watching the peasants toil... High tea in Britain is an early supper that the toiling peasants were more likely to eat. You're thinking of cream tea or just afternoon tea... certainly not high tea.

Christopher D. Holst aka "cdh"

Learn to brew beer with my eGCI course

Chris Holst, Attorney-at-Lunch

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Arghhhhh!  Please don't misuse "British-high-tea" so as confuse people into thinking that it is the genteel afternoon pastime of eating finger sandwiches, sipping tea and watching the peasants toil... High tea in Britain is an early supper that the toiling peasants were more likely to eat. You're thinking of cream tea or just afternoon tea... certainly not high tea.

Yea, I have often found it interesting that Americans confuse the different kinds of tea and somehow got to thinking that "high tea" is a dainty meal for the British upper classes when in fact the opposite is true. I doubt very much that the radish sandwich as described by Newman would be served at an authentic "high tea."

Still... I'm going to be making some radish sandwiches as soon as I can get down to the Green Market.

--

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Arghhhhh!  Please don't misuse "British-high-tea" so as confuse people into thinking that it is the genteel afternoon pastime of eating finger sandwiches, sipping tea and watching the peasants toil... High tea in Britain is an early supper that the toiling peasants were more likely to eat.  You're thinking of cream tea or just afternoon tea... certainly not high tea.

Poor choice of words on my part, as I am very well aware of the differences between the various types of "tea" meals. I received my education in the British Isles during the year I spent at university in Scotland; prior to that sojourn, I will admit to being a tea virgin. :wink:

alacarte, I'm going to the farmers' market this afternoon, so I shall ask the vendor about the Black Plum radishes. My guess is that it's not just a smaller black radish; the color really is a deep-dark plum, nothing like that of black radishes. I'll also ask if it's a regional variety.

JAZ, radish sprouts are fantastic. Just a hint of spice and bite, a perfect sandwich garnish!

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alacarte, I'm going to the farmers' market this afternoon, so I shall ask the vendor about the Black Plum radishes.  My guess is that it's not just a smaller black radish; the color really is a deep-dark plum, nothing like that of black radishes.  I'll also ask if it's a regional variety.

thanks! I look forward to hearing about them. How do they taste? I found black radishes to be way too harsh for my taste, almost horseradish-like. Maybe black plum radishes are milder?

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  • 11 months later...
afternoon tea vs. "high tea"

this has been a public service announcement.

Thanks for the nice article alacarte; nice to reminded that this is the time of year to eat these!

Also thanks for the PSA re: British teas. Now I will avoid at least one cultural faux pas when I travel to Great Britain... (one I've blissfully propogated by at least some city hotels in the US serving afternoon tea).

It may sound very British-high-tea, and I've also seen variations that mystifyingly claim to be Bavarian (served with black bread) or Scottish (add salt),

I was curious what is mystifying about the Bavarian ancestry. From family in Austria I know that this is eaten there... (When I told my mom about my discovery of "radishes with butter and salt" she said they had eaten sandwiches like this... (on dark or rye bread).

Thanks again!

Edited by ludja (log)

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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radish sandwiches divine yummy love love love, radish in general in fact love them bathed in bagna cuda, love them as garnish for tacos, love them with sea salt & butter, love them braised, & just love to see them all piled beautifully at the farmers market, fell in love with a bunch in Paris and kept them in my hotel room in a vase ...the bread shop in ABC carpet (19th street?) has a lovely radish open faced sandwich of radish & fresh ricotta..sprinkle of salt wee bit pepper & a few chives sooo lovely what would be more lovely would be to eat them in a rose garden with a glass of iced jasmine tea and some lavender lemon shortbread cookies whilst wearing a large straw hat

"sometimes I comb my hair with a fork" Eloise

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