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Entremet Mousse - Any way to stop sagging?


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Hi guys, I've made a few entremets now and while they initially look great, the mousse tends to sag as it comes up to fridge temperature (about 4 degrees celcius) which results in the glaze sagging or cracking if it's a flocked velvet effect. Just wondering if anyone has any idea how to prevent this? I'm assuming increasing the gelatine content but following several recipes to a T this still seems to come up (and I'd prefer not to create a really bouncy mousse). Does anyone have a recipe or formula for a stable mousse? Thanks in advance!

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I was quickly browsing through the topic titles, and at first (very quick) glance I thought this one was "Ethernet Mouse." "Hmm," I said to myself, "I didn't know there was such a thing—and what is it doing here instead of the Off-Topic Forum?" <slaps head>

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5 hours ago, JeanneCake said:

How large an entremet are you making? How deep is it? Is there cake (biscuit) or a firm crust (pate a sucree) as a base?

I’d say about 25cm diameter and about 10cm deep off the top of my head, I tend to use a daquoise or hard base

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You might need to increase the gelatin; one of our chocolate mousses needs a boost from the judicious addition of gelatin to keep it from "deflating" when we use it in a mold.  Maybe your recipe was originally intended to be spooned out of a vessel?   Do you use another layer of something in the center?  (Meaning, is yours a  layered entremet where you partially fill the mold/freeze then add a layer of something, add more mousse, then the base and freeze til firm?)

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20 hours ago, Jonathan said:

I’d say about 25cm diameter and about 10cm deep off the top of my head, I tend to use a dacquoise or hard base

 

The height may be an issue. Generally, the ones I do and have seen are done in 4.5cm rings - this is plenty of height to get mousse and any inserts you want. If you double that and more, you'll need to really start thinking about your structural integrity. Maybe layer up sponge and inserts from the base, rather than have them supported by the mousse? I generally don't bother suspending anything in the mousse at all, rather just using it to encase the base and inserts.

 

You might also want to look at what you're putting on the cake. Excess weight of decorations or thick glazes might be pulling it apart.

 

Additionally, it may be the quality and/or age of your gelatin.

 

For reference, here's one of mine from a while ago.

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There are a boatload of possible reasons for this: wrong recipe; wrong method; wrong gelatin; wrong dimensions, wrong storing...

When you ask for help you should try to put people in the best conditions to help, which means writing the details of what you do. If you remain ultra-generic then it's impossible to help. Saving energies in writing the details is against your own interest.

 

 

 

Teo

 

Teo

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