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Ganache: Tips, Techniques & Troubleshooting


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14 minutes ago, Jim D. said:

Another thought just popped into my head:  There is such a thing (I had to consult Google) as dried honey.  I have no idea what it tastes like, though I have some molasses powder that tastes fine, but it might even be possible to put all the flavors (not the rosewater) into the gianduja.  But I think I would go with the two layers for the sake of contrast.

I did look into that but it’s absolutely a nuisance to source

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at the risk of sounding like an idiot, couldn't one just dehydrate it in a dehydrator or low (if low enough) oven for a while and then grind it in the blender (if you don't want to order it online, say).

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9 hours ago, Jim D. said:

There is such a thing (I had to consult Google) as dried honey. 

Honey powder is fairly common in Korean markets and does taste like honey. Dissolves easily as well fwiw

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8 hours ago, jimb0 said:

at the risk of sounding like an idiot, couldn't one just dehydrate it in a dehydrator or low (if low enough) oven for a while and then grind it in the blender (if you don't want to order it online, say).

I've got so many single use appliances my home kitchen is getting very backed up (although a dehydrator has always been on the wants list) and after doing some digging apparently it reconstitutes quite quickly (so basically like a sugar version of honey). Still, I might get some to sprinkle on the bases as a finishing touch? The other idea would be to make a syrup so when you split the bars open it runs out just like a baklava? It's a little early (Mother's Day is in May here) but I'm thinking about doing a "Tastes of Home" theme for it and having a selection of desserts from around the world. Tiramisu was quite easy, I've got apple pie for the states so this will be a trial run to see how it pans out. I think it's going to be very sweet but I guess baklava IS just very sweet

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9 hours ago, Jonathan said:

I've got so many single use appliances my home kitchen is getting very backed up (although a dehydrator has always been on the wants list) and after doing some digging apparently it reconstitutes quite quickly (so basically like a sugar version of honey). Still, I might get some to sprinkle on the bases as a finishing touch? The other idea would be to make a syrup so when you split the bars open it runs out just like a baklava? It's a little early (Mother's Day is in May here) but I'm thinking about doing a "Tastes of Home" theme for it and having a selection of desserts from around the world. Tiramisu was quite easy, I've got apple pie for the states so this will be a trial run to see how it pans out. I think it's going to be very sweet but I guess baklava IS just very sweet

 

imo that sounds like it would look cool and dramatic, but do you really want to eat a chocolate bar that has filling pour out? tbh i don't think i would (though it would look attractive in photos). i suppose, of course, it depends on the viscosity - a caramel syrup that stretches but doesn't pour, is common, for example. and they're obviously used in bonbons, but you tend to plop those in all in one go.

 

i do like the idea of a honey-flavoured goo of some kind, though, for sure.

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1 hour ago, jimb0 said:

 

imo that sounds like it would look cool and dramatic, but do you really want to eat a chocolate bar that has filling pour out? tbh i don't think i would (though it would look attractive in photos). i suppose, of course, it depends on the viscosity - a caramel syrup that stretches but doesn't pour, is common, for example. and they're obviously used in bonbons, but you tend to plop those in all in one go.

 

i do like the idea of a honey-flavoured goo of some kind, though, for sure.

 

I'm still thinking over the baklava possibilities, and honey definitely has to be in the mix.  Any honey plus white chocolate ganache I have found sounds as if it would be teeth-torturingly sweet.  I don't see that a milk or dark chocolate ganache would be part of the baklava taste.

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My version of baklava which is not close to baklava is basically a duja on a mixture of nut pastes, some honey comb as crisp, also some salt for extra flavor. It's more like "inspired" by it.

 

Oh forgot about that I use milk chocolate.

Edited by Rajala (log)
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2 hours ago, Jim D. said:

 

I'm still thinking over the baklava possibilities, and honey definitely has to be in the mix.  Any honey plus white chocolate ganache I have found sounds as if it would be teeth-torturingly sweet.  I don't see that a milk or dark chocolate ganache would be part of the baklava taste.

I’m considering using opalys and this macadamia honey I’ve got which I’ve found less sweet than normal honey

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10 hours ago, Jonathan said:

I do like it but I still HATE tempering it and the price makes it for certain things only

I too hate tempering Opalys.  In making shells, at first it is too fluid and the shells turn out too thin unless one takes precautions.  Then, at some unpredictable point, it gets quite viscous, and shells are too thick.  Sometimes I have heated it to the 90F/32C point to get it to work.  Once before, when I was complaining about Opalys, @Kerry Bealhappened to be going to the Valrhona factory and asked them about it.  Her report:  "they said the white was very susceptible to over-crystallization so you had to take care not to scrape the last bits off the table into the bowl - keep the sides of the bowl warm and scrupulously clean."

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This wiki page https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Essential_oil says that "In relation with their food applications, although these oils have been used throughout history as food preservatives, it was in the 20th century when EOs were considered as Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)."

 

And ... there is a long list of essential oils on the page under the title of "Use in food" ...

 

Do you use essential oils in your ganaches safely?

Bitter almond, peppermint, thyme, orange, lemon, etc ...

 

 

Edited by Altay.Oro (log)
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27 minutes ago, pastrygirl said:

I've added LorAnn pure lemon, orange, and peppermint oils to both tempered chocolate and ganache. 

 

Maybe they are not so easily evaporating when used in tempered chocolate ... let me try ...

 

10 minutes ago, Jim D. said:

I have used peppermint, bitter almond, lemon, lime, and orange.  They are especially helpful when you want to add flavor to something without significant water (such as meltaways, gianduja, chocolate).

 

Thank you Jim ...

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Melissa Coppel is preapring a ganache here, https://www.instagram.com/p/CLjw2l7H4Dx/


It is very shiny and ... so elastic that going back and forth at the tip of the piping bag, if not a manipulated video.

I think that glucose syrup is responsible for the shine ... and invert sugar for elasticity,

Any other thoughts?

What is the fourth ingredient ... is it salt, maybe to much amount for salt ... or powdered sorbitol?

 

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