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Sweet Impact Mama

Customer requested a Mimosa truffle...

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But Marc de Champagne seems to be nearly impossible to find on this side of the Pond.  The request is from one of my wholesale customers, specifically for Valentine's Day.  I tried searching back in the other threads, for ideas, but this ingredient keeps coming up. Any way I can achieve this sort of flavor combo with a substitute? 

 

I've only ever had a mimosa once... it was yummy, but I'm not going to be a terribly good judge of whether the truffle tastes like it or not. Gonna need help from some experts on this one. Lol!

 

 

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2 minutes ago, Sweet Impact Mama said:

But Marc de Champagne seems to be nearly impossible to find on this side of the Pond.  The request is from one of my wholesale customers, specifically for Valentine's Day.  I tried searching back in the other threads, for ideas, but this ingredient keeps coming up. Any way I can achieve this sort of flavor combo with a substitute? 

 

I've only ever had a mimosa once... it was yummy, but I'm not going to be a terribly good judge of whether the truffle tastes like it or not. Gonna need help from some experts on this one. Lol!

 

 

Marc de Champagne doesn't taste like champagne anyway - it tastes like brandy because it is brandy. 

 

Why not make one of Paul Young's water ganaches - use champagne and orange juice as the liquid. 

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17 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

Marc de Champagne doesn't taste like champagne anyway - it tastes like brandy because it is brandy. 

 

Why not make one of Paul Young's water ganaches - use champagne and orange juice as the liquid. 

That's a good idea. Should I reduce the champagne some, to get rid of the fizzies?

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15 minutes ago, Sweet Impact Mama said:

That's a good idea. Should I reduce the champagne some, to get rid of the fizzies?

Nope - fizzles will disappear on their own.

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Cut strips of orange peel and infuse in cream to get the orange flavour in. Make ganache with white chocolate infused cream and champagne. 

 

Use ganache to roll into balls,  can dip in white chocolate or decorate 

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I used this one a couple of years ago as a filling for bonbons.  I cannot remember if I found it on here or not, but if so, sorry for not giving you credit.  Obviously the sparking wine can be whichever champagne you wish to use.

 

Mimosas

 

100g Hvy Cream

50g Glucose or Corn Syrup

50g Sparkling Wine

20g Orange Juice Concentrate

460g White Chocolate in temper

10g Cocoa Butter, melted in temper

 

1.    Bring just a boil first 2 ingredients.  Take off heat and add wine and juice.  Cool to 105°F

2.   Combine Chocolate and cocoa butter

3.   Emulsify both mixtures

4.   Cool to room temperature and pipe in shells

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On ‎1‎/‎2‎/‎2019 at 5:55 PM, Kerry Beal said:

Why not make one of Paul Young's water ganaches - use champagne and orange juice as the liquid.


That would be my first shot. Some flavors are just really difficult to push past the cream and chocolate in the smallish amounts used in most ganaches so anything that lets me get more of that flavor in the mix is a good thing. Orange isn't difficult to keep forward, champagne, recognizable as such, is. Eliminating the cream and using puree and a neutral oil in a ratio to mimic heavy cream at Kerry's suggestion made a huge difference when I was trying to do a blueberry ganache.

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I just watched two of Paul Young's videos, and he does not use any oil in his water ganaches--they are just sugar and water boiled together then poured over chocolate (and, in one case, lots of whiskey). The absence of oil would certainly bump up the taste of whatever flavor is being used, whether whiskey or blueberries.

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10 hours ago, Jim D. said:

I just watched two of Paul Young's videos, and he does not use any oil in his water ganaches--they are just sugar and water boiled together then poured over chocolate (and, in one case, lots of whiskey). The absence of oil would certainly bump up the taste of whatever flavor is being used, whether whiskey or blueberries.


I suppose it might at that. I'll have to do a side-by-side one of these days.

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While doing some Kerry and Jim inspired searching regarding the Paul Young water ganache, I stumble across this quote...

"I love champagne and chocolate. You warm the champagne just enough so that the chocolate melts in, then whisk it together to create the creamy ganache for the center."

So it sounds like he keeps it super simple with champagne. Maybe that with some orange zest in the pot while heating and then strain it out at the end would work as a place to start.

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2 hours ago, Tri2Cook said:


I suppose it might at that. I'll have to do a side-by-side one of these days.

When I have a substantial break, I am going to use Greweling's recipe (with oil) and also what Paul Young does to make a water ganache and see what happens. I will check the Aw reading of each. I have been trying to do a blueberry ganache for a long time, and this might be the solution (I see that you have worked on this as well). In fact, there are so many fruits that I have thought about, but using a regular ganache renders them tasteless. I was so convinced that peaches, for example, would make a delicious ganache, but they don't. I suppose I should post my results on the already-existing water ganache thread. If I am not mistaken, I think some eG people (including, I believe, @Kerry Beal) recently did a workshop with Paul Young; maybe they have some insights on his method.

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7 minutes ago, Jim D. said:

When I have a substantial break, I am going to use Greweling's recipe (with oil) and also what Paul Young does to make a water ganache and see what happens. I will check the Aw reading of each. I have been trying to do a blueberry ganache for a long time, and this might be the solution (I see that you have worked on this as well). In fact, there are so many fruits that I have thought about, but using a regular ganache renders them tasteless. I was so convinced that peaches, for example, would make a delicious ganache, but they don't. I suppose I should post my results on the already-existing water ganache thread. If I am not mistaken, I think some eG people (including, I believe, @Kerry Beal) recently did a workshop with Paul Young; maybe they have some insights on his method.

We did. The basic water ganache that we made had no oil. There was a fair amount of sugar added. 

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8 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

There was a fair amount of sugar added. 


That's the part I've been seeing in most of the stuff I was able to find that makes me want to do the comparison. Depending on the ganache, I'm thinking there may be cases where I'd rather have a little grapeseed oil than a fair amount of additional sugar.

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Sorry I never got back to all of you. Thank you for all the amazing brainstorming! I ended up going another direction, because I had real misgivings about the customer wanting me to recreate another chocolatier's V'day flavors and designs. Went with Passion Fruit Mango. But will definitely hold onto this thread for future work! 

 

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I recently made champagne ganache (basically just chocolate and champagne) and the champagne really go lost. Does anyone have experience with reducing the champagne first to get a more concentrated flavor? I know they sell champagne flavors, but I'd like to stick to the real thing. As for mimosa, I agree, getting the orange to come through is the easy part, the champagne, not so much.

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3 hours ago, Beckykp27 said:

I recently made champagne ganache (basically just chocolate and champagne) and the champagne really go lost. Does anyone have experience with reducing the champagne first to get a more concentrated flavor? I know they sell champagne flavors, but I'd like to stick to the real thing. As for mimosa, I agree, getting the orange to come through is the easy part, the champagne, not so much.

The use of champagne and chocolate has been discussed in this thread   The answer was to use marc de champagne instead of champagne itself.

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