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TheCulinaryLibrary

Wet spice/curry paste grinders

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I'm thinking of buying a wet spice/curry paste grinder. Any ideas on what brands are the best?

Premier super-g, Preethi ??


Edited by TheCulinaryLibrary (log)

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ultra pride is 110v and we have 240v in Oz so would prefer 240. Sumeet seems to be  unavailable. Any other  suggestions?

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ultra pride is 110v and we have 240v in Oz so would prefer 240. Sumeet seems to be  unavailable. Any other  suggestions?

You may want to contact the manufacturer directly. I would not be surprised with they have 240V versions and international distributors for their products. 

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Sorry, no.  When I had the room, I had a Sumeet.  BTW, other machines were discussed in the linked threads.


Edited by pbear (log)

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the other brands on the link have the same voltage problem.

the Sumeet has great reviews but is 120v.

Indian power is 240v like Oz and UK but I can't find an online source of the Indian home market version.

thx anyway, will keep looking

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Crazy.  This shouldn't be so hard, which I'm sure is exactly what you're thinking.

 

One idea, which perhaps you've already tried but I'll pass along in case not.  Following up on a lead from andie in the Sumeet thread, I notice Morphy Richards distributes a bunch of mixer grinders in India.  Available on their India website and Amazon India.  No idea whether it's possible for you to order through those sources.  Not listed on MR's Australia site, but maybe they can special order?


Edited by pbear (log)

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This afternoon I asked an Indian friend at work about these devices.  She allowed stone grinders (not necessarily electrically powered ones) were common in India.  She said she prefers her Vitamix.

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I would suggest you go to some Indian stores around you. These shops usually have various brands of appliances and could advise. I have a Preethi I got from India. My previous one was a Sumeet. Most of Indian mixer/grinders have heavy duty motors and are great for spice and grain grinding.

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Sumeet should be available again soon - apparently there were some family issues that resulted in stopping production - however those have been sorted and production has again started.  

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Sumeet should be available again soon - apparently there were some family issues that resulted in stopping production - however those have been sorted and production has again started.  

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Like a coffee grinder on steroids.  Mine will grind 2 inch saigon cinnamon to a powder.

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What kind of coffee grinder?  A burr grinder or something more like a Waring spice mill?

 

 

Edit:  I guess what I'd like is something similar to a colloid mill that didn't cost thousands of dollars.  In investigating MC gelato I have found that one person's idea of "smooth" is another person's "chunky".

 

My tongue cares.


Edited by JoNorvelleWalker (log)

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Spice mill - I've used it to make powdered sugar from regular sugar and chocolate liquor from nibs.

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So I seem to be in possession of a spice mill.

 

Specifically a Waring WSG60.  The proximate motivation was the Peruvian chicken recipe from @chefmd but the desire has been lurking for some while:

 

https://forums.egullet.org/topic/153954-planning-a-trip-to-lima-peru/?do=findComment&comment=2082033

 

 

Sometime I shall learn to read the size and weight specifications for a small appliance.  Well actually I did read the size and weight of the Waring but I have a problem translating numbers to the real world of counter space.  The base of the Waring is as large as the base of any blender I have seen, though the stainless steel grinding cups (two are supplied) are smaller than a typical blender jar:  the capacity is three cups dry or one and a half cups wet.  Rarely do I have a recipe that calls for more than three cups of ground spice, so I should be OK.

 

The thing is like a one speed blender.  Though it will only grind for two minutes and a half before shutting down.  It has a one horsepower motor that spins at 20,000 rpm so those two and a half minutes should reduce most herbs and spices.  The Waring is also billed for nut butters, however I am not holding my breath.

 

What is nice, the grinding cups go in the dishwasher.  Actually the manual says they go in a "commercial dishwasher" though I must say they were not destroyed by my ancient, cheap* apartment dishwasher.  Plus the Waring is certified NSF which is always nice.

 

My shipment of organic Peruvian Aji Panca arrives tomorrow.

 

 

*The dishwasher is cheap, the apartment is not cheap.

 

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Well, now I am in possession of a Premier grinder.  Nothing wrong with my Waring, mind you, but they are different animals.  I still seek the elusive pistachio paste which so far has been unobtanium.  Nut butter in the Waring has been passible.  But not the stuff of dreams.

 

Furthermore I am now into Georgian cookery which calls for walnut paste with every meal.  Indeed walnut paste was envisioned for tonight, but it turns out the Premier grinder requires breaking in to remove stone dust.  Who knew?  Several cups of peanut oil later and quite a messy clean up, I am now prepared.  I think.

 

The Warring jars go in the dishwasher.  None of the Premier parts go in the dishwasher.  Nothing like washing big heavy oily rocks by hand.

 

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I've been lusting after a stone wet grinder for a while now, primarily to make curry pastes.... 

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After one batch of walnut paste in the Premier I am most impressed with the results.  However I am overwhelmed by the work involved for cleanup.  Mainly because of the weight...a salient feature of granite.  I can hardly imagine little old ladies grinding curry pastes on a daily basis.  There must be a better way.  I wonder what would happen if I ran it for a while with water and detergent?

 

I wish though I had ordered the Premier a few weeks ago when they were still offering a free kilogram of chocolate with purchase.

 

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What about running it over a couple cut up sponges soaked in water and detergent?

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2 minutes ago, KennethT said:

What about running it over a couple cut up sponges soaked in water and detergent?

 

I'm not sure but it sounds messy.

 

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1 hour ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

However I am overwhelmed by the work involved for cleanup.  Mainly because of the weight...a salient feature of granite.  I can hardly imagine little old ladies grinding curry pastes on a daily basis.  There must be a better way.  I wonder what would happen if I ran it for a while with water and detergent?

 

I think running it with a few cups of hot water and a drop of detergent is totally worth a try!

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