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Shel_B

Vanilla Pudding

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Shel_B   

I like pudding.  Toots likes pudding.  The neighbor's little girl likes pudding.  However, I've not yet come across a vanilla pudding recipe that really satisfies me.  Some are too heavy on cornstarch, others are not thick and substantial enough, some are way too sweet without a corresponding strong, yet smooth, vanilla taste.

 

I'm looking for some tips on how to make my vanilla pudding better, to make it outstanding!  If you've got a proven, killer recipe, I'd like to see it, but more than anything, I'd like some ideas on how to make vanilla pudding with a great mouth feel and a rich, but not overly sweet, vanilla taste.  I've tried the Betty Crocker recipe, this recipe: http://www.chow.com/recipes/27483-easy-vanilla-pudding (which is similar), and this recipe:  http://allrecipes.com/recipe/homemade-vanilla-pudding/ all within the last 24-hours.

 

Thanks for any help.

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CatPoet   


This is my favorite  of vanilla puddings.

Bavaroise  a Vanilla.

 

3 gelatin leafs

1 vanilla pod

 

250 ml milk

100 ml sugar

4 eggyolks

200 ml cream

 

  Split and scrape  the vanilla pod and at into sauce pot. Add the milk and half of the sugar. Let it reach  boil, stir and then  set it a side for 15 min.  Leave the leafs in cold water for 5 min.

Whisk the eggyolks and the rest of sugar  until  pale and frothy.  Remove the vanilla pod from the milk.

Stir the eggs with the milk and take it back to low heat and stir until thickens  ( 85 C).  Squeeze out excess water from the  geletine leafs  and stir them into the warm mixture.  Strain and  chill  to 25- 20 C not colder.  Whisk the cream to medium peaks. Fold in  to the vanilla with a metal spoon. Add into 6 pudding molds or  1 big one.  Leave to set for 2to 6 hours. 

Dip the molds in hot water and turn out . Garnish with fruit and whipped cream.
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weinoo   

Interesting that this was posted back in February:

 

Shel_B, on 25 Feb 2014 - 2:48 PM, said:

I've been on a pudding jag lately, and have perfected my chocolate pudding, the vanilla pudding is just about where I want it, and I'm getting close with lemon pudding. 
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Shel_B   

Interesting that this was posted back in February:

 

Shel_B, on 25 Feb 2014 - 2:48 PM, said:

 

Indeed, but as I've learned more about making pudding, I realized I wasn't as close to what I wanted, and that what I thought was OK wasn't acceptable.  Often,  the more I learn the more I realize I have more to learn.

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Shel_B   

 

This is my favorite  of vanilla puddings. Bavaroise  a Vanilla.
 
3 gelatin leafs
1 vanilla pod
 
250 ml milk
100 ml sugar
4 eggyolks
200 ml cream
 
  Split and scrape  the vanilla pod and at into sauce pot. Add the milk and half of the sugar. Let it reach  boil, stir and then  set it a side for 15 min.  Leave the leafs in cold water for 5 min.
Whisk the eggyolks and the rest of sugar  until  pale and frothy.  Remove the vanilla pod from the milk.
Stir the eggs with the milk and take it back to low heat and stir until thickens  ( 85 C).  Squeeze out excess water from the  geletine leafs  and stir them into the warm mixture.  Strain and  chill  to 25- 20 C not colder.  Whisk the cream to medium peaks. Fold in  to the vanilla with a metal spoon. Add into 6 pudding molds or  1 big one.  Leave to set for 2to 6 hours. 
Dip the molds in hot water and turn out . Garnish with fruit and whipped cream.

 

 

I've never worked with leaf gelatin. I'd have to learn something about it.  As I recall, it comes in different strengths, at least here in the US.  Is that the same as where you are?  What strength do you use?

 

Your recipe is quite a bit different than the recipes I've been experimenting with, and that seems like a good thing and a good direction to go.  Thanks!

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CatPoet   

I know that  3 leaves becomes 1½ teaspoon gelatin powder, how ever I most often use 2 teaspoons, I can never find  the sane teaspoon , only the fancy one that is hellish to do half.

 

It a old fashion vanilla pudding  Bavaroise comes in many flavours,, vanilla is  the classic.  But I have had burnt sugar ( caramel),  chocolate and raspberry.  I even once got a three coloured one, that taste  weird.  We think my  elderly  relative had  some sort veggie in it too dye it green and we think the first flavour was carrot.  The same woman who in the end served  meatballs with chocolate sauce.

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Shel_B   

I know that  3 leaves becomes 1½ teaspoon gelatin powder, how ever I most often use 2 teaspoons, I can never find  the sane teaspoon , only the fancy one that is hellish to do half.

 

 

OK, that gives me a good starting point.  I'll pick up some more vanilla beans in the next couple of days and give the recipe a try.  In any case, you've opened my eyes to a new approach that may at least bring me closer to what I want.  Thanks!

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curls   

What do you like and what do you dislike about your current vanilla pudding recipe? What are your goals for this new vanilla pudding recipe?

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Tri2Cook   

Often,  the more I learn the more I realize I have more to learn.

Yep... I hope I never decide I know too much about anything to learn something new.

As for your question, I'd start with a recipe you've tried that gives you a texture you're happy with and adjust the sweetness and flavor to your liking. Changes in the amount of sugar won't mess up the texture and the vanilla can be adjusted as far as you want to take it. Options for that would include type of vanilla, extract vs beans, amount of either and whatever other options and combinations you can think of to get the flavor you're looking for. Bavarois is nice and worth experiencing if you haven't but it's not the same texture as what most people in North America think of when talking about "pudding". It can be chilled in a mold and unmolded on a plate without losing it's shape and eats more like a richer, heavier panna cotta.

 

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Shel_B   

 Bavarois is nice and worth experiencing if you haven't but it's not the same texture as what most people in North America think of when talking about "pudding". It can be chilled in a mold and unmolded on a plate without losing it's shape and eats more like a richer, heavier panna cotta.

 

 

Hmmm...I'm not really looking for a vanilla panna cotta.  I'll look further into the Bavarois ... never heard of it before today.  Thanks!

 

ETA: I see that Bavarois is essentially Bavarian Cream ... not really what I'm looking for.


Edited by Shel_B (log)

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CatPoet   

Hrm Most bavarian creams dont look like mine pudding. Yes  mine can be unmolded but  I most often dont and isnt a dense as a pannacotta.

 

I do have a thicker custard recipe but it calls for potato starch flour, which I know can be hard to find in the USA. Can you get hold of it?

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Shel_B   

Hrm Most bavarian creams dont look like mine pudding. Yes  mine can be unmolded but  I most often dont and isnt a dense as a pannacotta.

 

I do have a thicker custard recipe but it calls for potato starch flour, which I know can be hard to find in the USA. Can you get hold of it?

 

Potato starch flour is easy to come by.  I'd like to see your recipe, but I may not get around to playing with it for a while.  No hurry to post it.  I've got a number of cooking projects in the next couple of weeks, and then we're off on holiday for a couple of weeks.  I may take my laptop with me, so I can stay in touch, and I'll have a commercial kitchen available to play around in.

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CatPoet   

Oh that is nice. The other foodies I know in the USA  has always such a problem finding it, but then again they live in the South.

 

570 ml single cream or double cream
6 large eggyolks
50 gram of sugar
1 tablespoon of potato flour
1 vanilla pod or 1 tablespoon  vanilla essences.
 
 
If using a vanilla pod.  Scrape and add to the a sauce pan, add  the cream and let it come to a boil. Remove from the heat. Leave for  5 min.
 
Whisk sugar, eggyolks and potato flour to a pale frothy mix. 
 
Remove the pod or add the vanilla to the cream.
 
Whisk the hot cream into the eggs and  whisk until smooth.
 
Return to the heat and stir and stir until it  thickens. When it simmers remove from the heat. Leave to cool.

Edited by CatPoet (log)

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I may be a little slow here, but is pudding the same as pastry cream?

 

If so, it's good to incorporate gelatin and cocoa butter when it's still hot, blitz it, then fold in mascarpone once it's cold.

 

And then put it in choux pastry or between puff pastry sheets :)

 

Also, if you want a decent vanilla flavor, use 2 or 3 pods per liter of milk (split and scraped), bring to the boil and let it infuse for 24 hours.

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CatPoet   

Forgot to say, potato starch shouldn't boil like corn starch , one  bubble is enough and then off the heat or it become rubbery.

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jmacnaughton, pudding is like custard (not pouring custard).  Pastry cream is richer and thicker and not meant to be eaten alone.  Depending on the number of egg yolks and thickening added, it may be molded.  Blanc mange is the closest I can think of to American pudding.

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