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chile_peppa

Cookbooks – How Many Do You Own? (Part 3)

596 posts in this topic

I just gone another one!!  It's called Jewish Festival Cooking.

Is that new, or is it a new edition of The Jewish Festival Cookbook (originally) by Fannie Engle and Gertrude Blair. I have to admit that that book, first published in 1954 (I got it through a book club sometime after 1970), has given me better information about Jewish holidays than Hebrew school ever did. :wink: If it's the same one, I can definitely recommend the honey cake recipe.

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Is that new, or is it a new edition of The Jewish Festival Cookbook (originally) by Fannie Engle and Gertrude Blair.  I have to admit that that book, first published in 1954 (I got it through a book club sometime after 1970), has given me better information about Jewish holidays than Hebrew school ever did.  :wink:  If it's the same one, I can definitely recommend the honey cake recipe.

This is a different book from the one you have. The complete title is The Essential Book of Jewish Festival Cooking by Phyllis Glazer and Miriyam Glazer. It was published in spring, 2004. The book has grown on me since the first time I looked at it. Most of the recipes are based on biblical references and look good. There are a whole bunch that I want to try.


"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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  Most of the recipes are based on biblical references and look good.  There are a whole bunch that I want to try.

Oh, share, please! :biggrin:


"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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A guesstimate count could be as low as in the 90's and as high as over 150. I lost count a long time ago. :huh:

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Oh, share, please! :biggrin:

I used the book to make two things, and broke it in by staining it with a spurt of lemon juice. How's that for a coronation? :laugh:

I made the bulgur and pomagranate salad for the lunch I hosted on Thursday. This is a variation on tabbouleh -- bulgur, parsley, mint, pomagranate seeds, and a dressing of olive oil and lemon juice (i added some lemon zest as well). I am obsessed with bulgur, but this was a technique I've never used. Usually, I toast it in some oil and then add liquid and cook like rice. Here, they call for adding boiling water -- off heat -- covering the bowl tightly and letting it stand. Then, once the liquid is absorbed, fluffing up the grains. It's a great method. Nice texture to each grain and nothing clumped together.

The bulgur is seasonally appropriate because we were in the final days of Sukkot, which is the fall harvest holiday. And pomagranates are thought to have 613 seeds, one for each mitzvah in the torah.

The other recipe I made was for honey-basil pesto. I used it on salmon. Very easy and good.


"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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4 more for me. All William Sonoma. Sauce, Hors d'oeuvres, American, Steaks and Chops


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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As for the pomeganate myth, my brother has a pomegranate tree and we set out one day to test it out. We had some as low as 400 seeds and some over 1000. For 10 pomegranates, the average was 642. So much for that.


From Dixon, Wyoming

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4 more for me.  All William Sonoma.  Sauce, Hors d'oeuvres, American, Steaks and Chops

Are those good? I saw them at our small local bookstore and was intrigued. This bookstore owner is really bad at choosing cookbooks, so I assumed they were crap. :rolleyes:


Rachel Sincere

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Are those good?  I saw them at our small local bookstore and was intrigued.  This bookstore owner is really bad at choosing cookbooks, so I assumed they were crap.  :rolleyes:

Actually, yes. I like them. I've made several things from some of their other cookbooks and have been pretty pleased. They also give some detailed technique instructions in the back as well as helpful hints for each recipe and all recipes are accompanied by a colour photo.


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Two more: my advance order of Best American Recipes 2004-2005 came today, and I picked up The Martha Stewart Living CB for about 6 bucks.


Ruth Dondanville aka "ruthcooks"

“Are you making a statement, or are you making dinner?” Mario Batali

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I picked up 2 more today at Strand. The total came to $37 (with tax) which is less than the cover price of Dessert U.

My new editions are:

Dessert University by R. Mesnier

Come for Dinner by Leslie Revsin


"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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Got a little package from Amazon a few days ago...

Jeni Wright's Patisserie of Italy (egull-Amazon link, $ for egull if you order thru this link)

Some of the recipes I'm looking forward to making:

Focaccia di Pere (Sweet Pear Pizza)

Torte de Castagne (Chestnut Cake)

Torta Gianduja (Chocolate Hazelnut Cake)

Genovesa con Panne e Frutta (Cream Cake with fresh Fruit)

Torta Elisabetta (Marzipan, Cherry and Ricotta Bombe)

Pinolata (Pine Nut Tart)

Marasche (Maraschino Almond Bites)

Gubana (Fruit and Nut Snail Bread)

...


Edited by ludja (log)

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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I have two more to add:

Gave in and picked up Cooking with Mr. Latte. Wish I had had it this summer. It will make a great by-the-pool-mindless-summer-read. If only it was written by say, Judy Blume.

Yesterday at the farmer's market I work at I picked up From Asparagus to Zucchini: A guide to Cooking Farm-Fresh Season Produce.

It gives historical information, cooking and storing tips plus recipes for some really random and quite common veggies. It was supposed to be a gift for a friend but we got hit with a freak rain storm and the copy I had put aside got wet. So now I get to keep it :smile:


True Heroism is remarkably sober, very undramatic.

It is not the urge to surpass all others at whatever cost,

but the urge to serve others at whatever cost. -Arthur Ashe

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Hillvalley, ist that produce book you mention available commercially? It sounds like a perfect addition to my (growing :blush:) reference library.

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Hillvalley, ist that produce book you mention available commercially? It sounds like a perfect addition to my (growing :blush:) reference library.

Check out this link. I paid $19.95 and it sounds cheaper on the web site. The more I go through the book the more annoyed I am that summer is over.


True Heroism is remarkably sober, very undramatic.

It is not the urge to surpass all others at whatever cost,

but the urge to serve others at whatever cost. -Arthur Ashe

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Link didn't work when I just tried: http://www.macsac.org/foodbk.php :sad: Is it correct? or shall I just try again later?

Still no luck several hours later, but if Rachel Sincere says it's availabe at B & N, that gives me a start. Thanks.


Edited by Suzanne F (log)

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That's an awesome cookbook! I just looked at it at the Barnes and Noble the other day. If you notice, it's written by people in the Madison area. :wub: I'm saving up for it, that's the next must-have. The link worked for me.


Rachel Sincere

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I have about 150: I find that once I get past 150 I can't remember what is in every book so I weed them out at that point. This is cookbooks only: books on food where recipes are not the main focus probably add 50.

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Well, I didn't find that veg book at Borders, but how could I leave empty-handed? :unsure::blush: So three more for me.

Two books that I worked on (unfortunately I do not receive free copies; I bought these): Jessica B. Harris's On the Side and the very first book I was supposed to do, Secrets of Colombian Cooking, which turned out to be a HUGE learning experience all around.

Also, Mr. Cutlets's Meat Me in Manhattan, just because.

:biggrin:

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When I first posted, I did not realize that books about food count. Put me down for another 65 books.....

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Oh no. It's barely 2 days since I last posted, and . . . 2 more. :blush:

Marcella Says . . . (well, as I've lamented before, my clients don't normally give me a copy of what I work on :sad:)

Vegetables Every Day by Jack Bishop.

:hmmm: Hmm, I see a certain closeness in design between the two books -- same typeface, similar greenish cast . . . I wonder if HarperCollins got a good deal on the inks? :raz: Actually, there's something rather comforting about the similarity, although I can't put my finger on it. Besides the quality of the recipes and the illustrations, do you prefer some books over others because they just look better to you overall?

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Um... I seem to have had a major relapse:

Coastal Carolina Cooking by Kathy Hart and Nancy Davis

Hoppin' John's Lowcountry Cooking by John Martin Taylor

The New Low-Country Cooking by Marvin Woods

North Carolina and Old Salem Cookery by Beth Tartan

North Carolina Barbecue by Bob Garner

Good Old Grits Cookbook by Bill Neal and David Perry

(Anyone notice a pattern there?)

Plus (sigh):

Indian Home Cooking by Suvir Saran and Stephanie Lyness

Anthony Bourdain's Les Halles Cookbook by Himself, Jose de Meirelles and Philippe Lajaunie because how could I not?

and finally (yeah, right):

Cook 1.0 by eGullet's own heidihi, Heidi Swanson (congrats, Heidi!)

So nine more for me. Ugh. At this rate, I'm going to have like 45¢ to spend on my vacation! :sad:

Yikes,

Squeat

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