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jaroj

Closing Wine Filled Chocolates

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jaroj   

Just joined the community and have to say that it has been wonderful reading so many interesting and educational topics specificallly for sugar confections and chocolate, and during the past few days have read more than 8 hours a day (almost
like a full time job) and haven't been able to finish, hopefully will accomplish this task someday.

However have not found an answer to a project that I'm venturing into.

Have a customer that wants filled molded chocolate with red wine, white wine and champagne. The problem part and cannot figure
out is how to close the mold once I fill it with the wine, since the chocolate will be denser and tend to displace the liquid(wine)
from the cavity. Was planning to use a hydrocolloid to thicken the wine and have a higher density (making the wine into kind of a jelly or perhaps some caviar spheres, like the molecular gastronomy) since I dont want to add nothing to the wine itself and leave it the most natural as possible, the wines are of different varities such as merlot, cabernet, etc.

Any suggestions will be greatly appreciated

Thanks

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curls   

Welcome jaroj. I don't have an answer to your question about filling chocolates with wine, I am sure that someone on this forum does. Just a suggestion... start your own topic for your question, I think you will get a lot more answers.

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I can only think of floating some cocoa butter on top of the wine, then capping after that sets up. But your idea of making the wine gel very lightly isn't bad, agar agar comes to mind since you could incorporate that without having to boil the wine.

Sent from my DROID X2 using Tapatalk 2

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Just joined the community and have to say that it has been wonderful reading so many interesting and educational topics specificallly for sugar confections and chocolate, and during the past few days have read more than 8 hours a day (almost
like a full time job) and haven't been able to finish, hopefully will accomplish this task someday.

However have not found an answer to a project that I'm venturing into.

Have a customer that wants filled molded chocolate with red wine, white wine and champagne. The problem part and cannot figure
out is how to close the mold once I fill it with the wine, since the chocolate will be denser and tend to displace the liquid(wine)
from the cavity. Was planning to use a hydrocolloid to thicken the wine and have a higher density (making the wine into kind of a jelly or perhaps some caviar spheres, like the molecular gastronomy) since I dont want to add nothing to the wine itself and leave it the most natural as possible, the wines are of different varities such as merlot, cabernet, etc.

Any suggestions will be greatly appreciated

Thanks



If you feel comfortable you could use inverse spherification. I hove done something similar with a raspberry juice:

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Chef Eddy has another method using fondant, here is link: http://www.chefeddy....led-chocolates/

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Edward J   

-Fill your mold with wine, leaving a 2 mm gap between the surface of the liquid and the rim of the mold.

-Get a piece of silicone paper or acetate the same size as your mold

-Spread a thin layer of tempered couverture on the paper, say 1-11/2 mm thick.

-Lay the paper over the filled mold, trowel smooth.

-When set, remove paper.

The booze will only last a few days at the most. The liquid will attack the sugar in the couverture and dissolve it. Might have some luck lining the mold with cocoa butter after coating it with cuverture, dunno, never tried that, always made sure they were consumed within 24 hrs.

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-Fill your mold with wine, leaving a 2 mm gap between the surface of the liquid and the rim of the mold.

-Get a piece of silicone paper or acetate the same size as your mold

-Spread a thin layer of tempered couverture on the paper, say 1-11/2 mm thick.

-Lay the paper over the filled mold, trowel smooth.

-When set, remove paper.

The booze will only last a few days at the most. The liquid will attack the sugar in the couverture and dissolve it. Might have some luck lining the mold with cocoa butter after coating it with cuverture, dunno, never tried that, always made sure they were consumed within 24 hrs.

I've used this technique several times to mold liquid centers--it's a little messy, but effective.

Rich

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You can go 50/50 with a product by Valrhona called Absolu Crystol. I've done this in the past for alcohol filled bonbons.

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You can make a jelly with agar agar, then blend it down to a paste to pipe it in the mold.

Prairie girls suggestion with the neutral glaze works as well but will sweeten your alcohol mix.

You can also spray a layer or tempered cocoa butter to create a membrane that will protect the liquids.

The issue of liquids will be the fact that they will leak out very fast. I would go for the agar solution with a sheet of gelatine to absorb the extra humidity or make a ganache. There are nice chocolates out there that can be paired with wines and enhance the flavour. That's my personal thoughts on the question.

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You can make a jelly with agar agar, then blend it down to a paste to pipe it in the mold.

Prairie girls suggestion with the neutral glaze works as well but will sweeten your alcohol mix.

You can also spray a layer or tempered cocoa butter to create a membrane that will protect the liquids.

The issue of liquids will be the fact that they will leak out very fast. I would go for the agar solution with a sheet of gelatine to absorb the extra humidity or make a ganache. There are nice chocolates out there that can be paired with wines and enhance the flavour. That's my personal thoughts on the question.

Rodney,

If you come to the chocolate workshop - would you like to demo this?

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You can make a jelly with agar agar, then blend it down to a paste to pipe it in the mold.

Prairie girls suggestion with the neutral glaze works as well but will sweeten your alcohol mix.

You can also spray a layer or tempered cocoa butter to create a membrane that will protect the liquids.

The issue of liquids will be the fact that they will leak out very fast. I would go for the agar solution with a sheet of gelatine to absorb the extra humidity or make a ganache. There are nice chocolates out there that can be paired with wines and enhance the flavour. That's my personal thoughts on the question.

Rodney,

If you come to the chocolate workshop - would you like to demo this?

Which part?

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You can make a jelly with agar agar, then blend it down to a paste to pipe it in the mold.

Prairie girls suggestion with the neutral glaze works as well but will sweeten your alcohol mix.

You can also spray a layer or tempered cocoa butter to create a membrane that will protect the liquids.

The issue of liquids will be the fact that they will leak out very fast. I would go for the agar solution with a sheet of gelatine to absorb the extra humidity or make a ganache. There are nice chocolates out there that can be paired with wines and enhance the flavour. That's my personal thoughts on the question.

Rodney,

If you come to the chocolate workshop - would you like to demo this?

Which part?

You can make a jelly with agar agar, then blend it down to a paste to pipe it in the mold.

Prairie girls suggestion with the neutral glaze works as well but will sweeten your alcohol mix.

You can also spray a layer or tempered cocoa butter to create a membrane that will protect the liquids.

The issue of liquids will be the fact that they will leak out very fast. I would go for the agar solution with a sheet of gelatine to absorb the extra humidity or make a ganache. There are nice chocolates out there that can be paired with wines and enhance the flavour. That's my personal thoughts on the question.

Rodney,

If you come to the chocolate workshop - would you like to demo this?

Which part?

Which ever part you want!

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You can make a jelly with agar agar, then blend it down to a paste to pipe it in the mold.

Prairie girls suggestion with the neutral glaze works as well but will sweeten your alcohol mix.

You can also spray a layer or tempered cocoa butter to create a membrane that will protect the liquids.

The issue of liquids will be the fact that they will leak out very fast. I would go for the agar solution with a sheet of gelatine to absorb the extra humidity or make a ganache. There are nice chocolates out there that can be paired with wines and enhance the flavour. That's my personal thoughts on the question.

Rodney,

If you come to the chocolate workshop - would you like to demo this?

Which part?

You can make a jelly with agar agar, then blend it down to a paste to pipe it in the mold.

Prairie girls suggestion with the neutral glaze works as well but will sweeten your alcohol mix.

You can also spray a layer or tempered cocoa butter to create a membrane that will protect the liquids.

The issue of liquids will be the fact that they will leak out very fast. I would go for the agar solution with a sheet of gelatine to absorb the extra humidity or make a ganache. There are nice chocolates out there that can be paired with wines and enhance the flavour. That's my personal thoughts on the question.

Rodney,

If you come to the chocolate workshop - would you like to demo this?

Which part?

Which ever part you want!

I'll do my best for the Sunday then. I should be off that day.

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