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FoodMan

Dinner! 2003

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J Acord the menu sound lovely but I'm not seeing the photos ... where in the U.S. was it cooked? (Wondering if the ingredients were influenced by region.)


Priscilla

Writer, cook, & c. ● #TacoFriday observant ●  Twitter    Instagram

 

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Hi Xanthippe, will pull it back and bit and start from the beginning - the salmon tuiles, No. 1 in the book...

The old guy who used to own/run the Inn was worth the price of the pint itself. Like stepping into an English country pub, or more, his home, with the fire going strong. He was old then, fear he has left this mortal coil by now. A nice, honorable man. Never tried Flint's Blondies was the Berkeley hang I (and it seemed, every student went to) for cheap eats...I remember huge buckets of tomato sauce lining the entryway. Must have been laced, by the addiction the place held over many...

Your strawberries sound great - esp., Frangelico, something I haven't put together before. Tonight's something fish (our great market is L. Isaacson, a nice wonderland of fresh seafood for this landlocked region), but have some nice berries to finish with.


-Paul

 

Remplis ton verre vuide; Vuide ton verre plein. Je ne puis suffrir dans ta main...un verre ni vuide ni plein. ~ Rabelais

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Last night:

Green lentils simmered with proscuitto di Parma, garlic, shallot, jalapeno, etc.

Salmon, skin-on (I LOVE FISH SKIN), dusted with sea salt and cayenne pepper, crisped on the stove and finished in the oven.

I intended to sauce it with a kind-of balsamic reduction, but I turned the balsamic to tar in the saucepan :unsure: But it was delicious without it.

Dessert was strawberries and raspberries in a Beaujolais sauce, served over Ben & Jerry Vanilla.


Noise is music. All else is food.

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J Acord -

Second on the food - beautiful work, thanks for the photos.


-Paul

 

Remplis ton verre vuide; Vuide ton verre plein. Je ne puis suffrir dans ta main...un verre ni vuide ni plein. ~ Rabelais

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Let's see if I can remember the last week or so...

Wednesday - Grilled sockeye salmon fillets, mashed potatoes with leeks & thyme, some type of vegetable

Thursday - Grilled whole red snapper with herbs, mashed potatoes with leeks & thyme (heh, leftovers)

Friday - Leg of Lamb, roasted potatoes using duck fat & thyme, steamed asparagus

Saturday - Sockeye salmon fillet w/ balsamic glaze, lentils with fresh herbs, snap beans

Sunday - Lamb stew (oh oh, leftovers x 2)

Monday - Taco, taco. Burrito, burrito.

Tuesday - grilled muscovy duck breast w/shallot reduction, lentils with not-so-fresh herbs (damn, more leftovers), steamed broccoli

Tonight - Buffalo wings, carrot sticks with homemade bleu cheese dressing, upset stomach for dessert

Tomorrow - Pepto Bismal shake topped with antacid tablet sprinkles (but the wings were worth it)

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Red bean ice cream for dessert.  Why is it you can't get red bean or green tea ice cream at the supermarket?  I'd spring for some in a heartbeat.

Soba, you are in the wrong country! :biggrin:

Those (and vanilla, chocolate and strawberry) are the ONLY ice creams I can find.

How I long for a selection....................... :sad:


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Thursday dinner:

miso marianted then grilled flounder

shirae (tofu and sesame dressed) green beans and carrots

wild mushroom and bacon stir fry

Japanese rice

red wine rakkyo

dessert:

oatmeal chocolate chip cookies


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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stole idea from craig claiborne to use leftover cold-cut slices (in my case, montreal smoked meat) as cornets for chicken salad with lemon juice, mayo, tons of :smile: chopped fennel bulb, celery, coriander leaf and seed.

unpretentious, a bit bizarre, but good!

gus


"The cure for anything is salt water: sweat, tears, or the ocean."

--Isak Dinesen

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I tried something "avant-garde" tonight.

Carmelized onion/brie Tart with a black pepper/rosemary/vidalia sorbet (think apple pie and ice cream).

It actually worked really well.

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Another dinner for one, with Socrates off being the diligent scholar:

Green garlic soup (yes, again -- I never tire of it) with homemade creme fraiche

Salmon chorizo hash topped with two poached eggs

Dandelion greens with garlic and lemon

Several slices of Acme Bakery's stellar ciabatta bread

A glass of Hemlock House Read

And for dessert, a chocolate-blood orange curd tartlet with fresh strawberries (macerated in superfine sugar and cassis -- thanks, Soba!) and whipped cream

J Acord, I fervently wish I had the ability to jump into my 'puter screen so I could eat the images in your pictures!

Yes, I do remember the elderly chap from the Pelican Inn, paul o'; in fact, he was holding court the very last time I was there, many a year ago.

I shall make the supreme sacrifice the next time I'm in Berkeley and skip Flint's so I can go to Blondie's.

Oh, and enjoy those ethereal salmon tuiles. :smile:

pixelchef, your "apple pie and ice cream" idea sounds great! I can readily believe it worked well.

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Steamed sa ho rice noodles with fried dried shrimp and slivered scallions.

Kimchi pancakes.

Seared sea scallops atop watercress with a mustard and sesame dressing.

Braised short ribs served with braising juices and gojuchang.

Shiro miso shiru (white miso soup) with enoki mushrooms.

Onigiri (rice balls) filled with pieces of braised pork belly and leeks.

Five kinds of kimchi.

(For twenty-five.)


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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Wednesday:

Carrot and red pepper soup, with creme fraiche and slow-roasted tomatoes

Pan-seared halibut, with lime and jalapeno butter

Fennel, mushroom and watercress salad, topped with shavings of Parm-Reg. (dressed with lemon juice, EVOO, salt, cracked black pepper)

Crepes, topped with roasted apples and Calvados sauce, served alongside French vanilla ice cream. (Peel, core and slice apples into wedges; toss with unsalted butter, lemon juice and brown sugar and place into a pre-buttered baking dish; roast in a pre-heated oven at 350 degrees for 20 to 30 minutes or until apples are cooked through and tender. The Calvados sauce is just a reduction of apple cider with a little light brown sugar, a splash of Calvados, and a bouquet garni of cinnamon, cloves and crystallized ginger.)

Lemon barley water.

Soba

Edit: added recipe for roasted apples.


Edited by SobaAddict70 (log)

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Mediterranean sea bass baked en papillote with fennel, tomatoes (and w/w, bouquet garni, kosher salt, cracked pepper). Potato-leek galette. More Riesling.

Always, MORE RIESLING.


-Paul

 

Remplis ton verre vuide; Vuide ton verre plein. Je ne puis suffrir dans ta main...un verre ni vuide ni plein. ~ Rabelais

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By the way, Xanthippe, I love blood oranges, wish they were more readily available. Your tartlet sounds great. I want to make a blood orange beurre blanc for some more fish this week, if I can get ahold of the oranges...


Edited by paul o' vendange (log)

-Paul

 

Remplis ton verre vuide; Vuide ton verre plein. Je ne puis suffrir dans ta main...un verre ni vuide ni plein. ~ Rabelais

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Thursday dinner:

Korean style beef and tofu patties served on a bed of steamed baby bok choy and served with a soy-vinegar-sesame seed-chile dipping sauce

pork and shrimp shumai

sliced tomato

cabbage kimchi and octopus kimchi

Japanese rice


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Last evening nice Alaskan halibut on the grill over mesquite. Strawberry beurre blanc. Redleaf salad with white wine vinegar/grapeseed oil dressing. Remains of a focaccia split, grilled briefly.


Priscilla

Writer, cook, & c. ● #TacoFriday observant ●  Twitter    Instagram

 

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By the way, Xanthippe, I love blood oranges, wish they were more readily available.  Your tartlet sounds great.  I want to make a blood orange beurre blanc for some more fish this week, if I can get ahold of the oranges...

I'm a blood orange fiend, paul 'o! Happily, I've been finding lovely Moros at the farmers' market fairly frequently; hope you're able score some for your weekend beurre blanc.

What kind of fish, and how are you going to prepare it?

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Oregano and Lemon Thyme Chick Pea Flour Pizza with a Tomato and Onion Confit, topped with Cheve right before being put in the broiler.

Maybe an arugula salad later.

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nerissa, I often do chickpea flour (gram) frites. But I'm not sure how I would go about doing a supportable pizza crust (which MUST have a crisp edge and a foldable centre to be a pizza crust). Any hints?


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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I followed a pretty basic recipe of Madhur Jaffreys. She said to use a stick free pan. Spooned maybe 1 1/2 evvo onto pan. Med high. I poured the batter (after letting it sit for an hour) into my cast iron pan, and let it set for about 4 minutes on med high. I then spooned out the sauteed tomato/onion mixture...

She said broil about 4 minutes until brown patches or golden. I kept rotating it every 4 minutes, and did 2-4-5 increments (my oven is terrible and ancient) until the edges were crisp. It was pretty thin to begin with and because I used cast iron, the bottom of the crust browned nicely.

Oh, I meant "chevre" not cheve. Great with the wonderful nuttiness of the crust.


Edited by nerissa (log)

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Wednesday:

Baby red leaf lettuce dressed with very olive-y olive oil, lemon juice, Maldon salt

Spring pea and vidalia onion risotto

Braised white beans, inspired by a classmate demo, with bits of onion, carrot, celery, tomato

Quick-sauteed baby zucchini in clarified butter, with fresh herbs

Seared balsamic-glazed shrimp

Pound cake

Queen Anne cherries from the tree in my front yard, simmered in a touch of rum and brown sugar (the cherries are still a week or so from being fully ripe)

Purchased butter pecan ice cream

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Its just started raining in Bombay (though maybe not full monsoon yet) and the veggies in the market are looking fresh and cheerful. There were these big bunches of spring onions with long, bright green shoots on top. This is always tempts me into cooking them with chickpea flour, a standard Gujarati technique that can be used with all sorts of leafy veggies, or green peppers, but I like it best with spring onions.

I roasted some chickpea flour till it smelled 'cooked', sieved it with turmeric, coriander-cumin powder and red chilli powder, and then added a little oil to make it into very fine breadcrumb texture. Sliced the onion bulbs and sauteed them with a couple of chopped up green chillies and then when they were soft, added the chopped green sping onion tops. When they were wilted, added some salt and then the chickpea flour mixture and cooked it till dry. The aim is to get the wilted green and onions surrounded by golden grains of the chickpea flour mixture.

This is allium lovers bliss, eaten with slices of seven grain bread and listening to the rain fall,

Vikram

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Its just started raining in Bombay (though maybe not full monsoon yet) and the veggies in the market are looking fresh and cheerful. There were these big bunches of spring onions with long, bright green shoots on top. This is always tempts me into cooking them with chickpea flour, a standard Gujarati technique that can be used with all sorts of leafy veggies, or green peppers, but I like it best with spring onions.

I roasted some chickpea flour till it smelled 'cooked', sieved it with turmeric, coriander-cumin powder and red chilli powder, and then added a little oil to make it into very fine breadcrumb texture. Sliced the onion bulbs and sauteed them with a couple of chopped up green chillies and then when they were soft, added the chopped green sping onion tops. When they were wilted, added some salt and then the chickpea flour mixture and cooked it till dry. The aim is to get the wilted green and onions surrounded by golden grains of the chickpea flour mixture.

This is allium lovers bliss, eaten with slices of seven grain bread and listening to the rain fall,

Vikram

Vikram,

sounds wonderful!

welcome to egullet, hope to hear more like this.


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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I roasted some chickpea flour till it smelled 'cooked', sieved it with turmeric, coriander-cumin powder and red chilli powder, and then added a little oil to make it into very fine breadcrumb texture.

This is intriguing. Do you roast the chickpea flour when you use it in batter, like in vegetable bhajis?

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I roasted some chickpea flour till it smelled 'cooked', sieved it with turmeric, coriander-cumin powder and red chilli powder, and then added a little oil to make it into very fine breadcrumb texture.

This is intriguing. Do you roast the chickpea flour when you use it in batter, like in vegetable bhajis?

No I think those use chickpea flour direct, but I admit I never cook bhajis myself. I'm terrible at deep frying (which I rationalise by telling myself how unhealthy it is anyway) and anyway, I think bhaji are best eaten hot from a roadside hawker's pan (though lets not even get into the health aspects of that).

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