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sivasushi

Sushi is so simple and yet very difficult to master >_<

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I had been working as a sushi chef for a while now and one thing that I learn about sushi is "never ending learning and practice". And that the reason that I fall in love with it. It look so down to earth simple but yet very complicated. At this point I guess my sensei was right because he said that he still learning and practicing everyday ^^.

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I talked with a coffee roaster today, he told me: "I started 40 years ago and I am still learning everyday" The guy looked pretty darn happy to me. Where did you learn sushi making?


My blog about food in Japan

Foodie Topography

www.foodietopography.com

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I learn at the school in LA " sushi chef institute" and I'm feel happy everyday when I go to work. Can't wait to go to work. That was amazing me ^^

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I'd most like to hear about your experience at sushi school. What you've learned and what we can learn from it.


Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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Oh in sushi school I got a very good experience. In the class begin with Japanese culture and the important of the season relate with Japanese culture. After that I learn lot of japanses term mostly the one that relate with cooking that include all the tool and ingredients. The teacher make sure that I got it all >_< a bit hard at beginning. Them after you got a general idea about these basic stuff. Class move on to more cooking Japanese food in general and knife technic. ( these is first month). Then the 2 month all the topic concentrate on sushi , rice, and fish ( how to choose, buy, store both fresh and frozen product) and how to calculate food cost. And in order to graduate you hot to pass both writing and skill test ( hand on prepare sushi for the real customer this I found very difficult. It same like going back to school ( class start 8:00 am - 2:00 pm 5 days a week for 2 month ) it was very fun and lot of work. But the most importance that I got from sushi school is to respect Japanese culture and respect the nature ^^. It had been almost 7 years now. I'm still have to practice everyday sushi is not an easy thing >_<

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Oh in sushi school I got a very good experience. In the class begin with Japanese culture and the important of the season relate with Japanese culture. After that I learn lot of japanses term mostly the one that relate with cooking that include all the tool and ingredients. The teacher make sure that I got it all >_< a bit hard at beginning. Them after you got a general idea about these basic stuff. Class move on to more cooking Japanese food in general and knife technic. ( these is first month). Then the 2 month all the topic concentrate on sushi , rice, and fish ( how to choose, buy, store both fresh and frozen product) and how to calculate food cost. And in order to graduate you hot to pass both writing and skill test ( hand on prepare sushi for the real customer this I found very difficult. It same like going back to school ( class start 8:00 am - 2:00 pm 5 days a week for 2 month ) it was very fun and lot of work. But the most importance that I got from sushi school is to respect Japanese culture and respect the nature ^^. It had been almost 7 years now. I'm still have to practice everyday sushi is not an easy thing >_<

Wow, Sivasushi, you have put into words my feeling of almost reference for the skills -- seemingly simple yet never mastered -- of a true sushi chef. And you articulate what I always imagined must be one of the starting points of that learning: the importance of the seasons and how it relates to Japanese culture.

Anyway, I'm fascinated to hear more! :biggrin:

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Thank you I'm glad that I'm not the only one who think this way. So far the most happy moment in this career is one time I got these little Japanese kid ( about 6 years old ) came up to me with his Mom and said big long word which I don't understand ( because it in Japanese >_< ) but his Mom translate and I learn that he said how much he enjoy it and said thank you. These moment for me is priceless. It feel so good I really want to go to work and see that kind of smile everyday ^^ ( this keep me go on with all none sense politic in the restaurant ). Lot of time I can't said anything at work. Because they don't really understand how sushi is important for me >_<''

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I never tried to learn how to make a sushi. But I would love to learn how to do it too. Yes it looks very simple in appearance, but I love sushi! :)

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I asked my favorite sushi guy how long it takes to make a good maki. He said something like "ten years and ten minutes".


Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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Years ago, I was watching Ina Garten, the Barefoot Contessa on TV. I just happen to tape the show. It was the show where she was making snacks for her bridge club. One of the things she made was vegetable sushi.

I watched the show several times, she explained it and demonstrated it. It seemed simple enough, so my friend and I went to the local gigantic asian market and bought the stuff. We watched the video, stopped it and did the steps, one by one. At the end, we had two platters of fairly delicious sushi. We've expanded our repertoire, went to a sushi class at a local restaurant store, gotten some books.

Once we have the basic supplies, all we need to get is the sushi grade tuna and salmon for about $18. We have the nori, sesame seeds and a couple of wasabi bottles and powder. We can get some dumplings and edaname.

Boy, do we go to town! I have a rice cooker and we make a feast.

I'm sure if you do a search on Foodtv's website, you can find Ina's original video.

Susan

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