Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

One interesting box of chocolates


jsmeeker
 Share

Recommended Posts

After I was done eating some BBQ on Sunday, I swung by a little chocolate shop a block away called Dude, Sweet. Friendly place. Staff offering up samples of all sorts of things. One of the more interesting things was their toffee Fungus Amoungus.

One of the things I bought was a box of chocolates called "Dude"

dudesweetchocolate-20110222-200720.jpg

So far, I have had the Puro and the Marakesh.

There was a slight olive taste to the Puro, but I really didn't pick up on any distinct saltiness. But maybe that's the point? The salt is there to enhance the other flavors and not really to bring an actual saltiness to it. The Marakesh faired much better. Nice sweetness from the dates. I'm not really familiar with Raz (ras?) al Hanout, so it's hard for me to say if that flavor is present. But whatever it is, that piece was great. I'll save the rest for later. Don't want to eat it all at once. Box set me back $12.

The other thing I bought was a chocolate bar called "Kampot" The label describes it "65% Columbian dark, Kampot pepper, and cocoa nib". I have not tried this yet, but I will report back when I do.

Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So is the "Dude, Sweet," moniker have some sort of meaning for the owners or is it just a catchy name they came up with. I think of "Dude" and chocolates in Texas and I'm not sure I see the link over to the style of confections they offer.

So tell me more about the toffee "Fungus Amoungus." Did you try it? I'm wondering about the flavor mixing of porcini with chocolate.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You haven's seen "Dude, Where's My Car"? :raz:

The toffee was interesting. To me, the most interesting part was the texture. It was kinda soft and crumbly. One of the people there made a comment about that to another customer, but I didn't quite catch it. However, the flavor of the mushrooms worked well. The toffee wasn't super sweet, either.

Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Funnily enough, we also stopped by Dude Sweet after we went to Lockhart Smokehouse - my wife got the Blackstrap Fudge (blackstrap rum, blackstrap molasses, drunken pecans) and loved it. Next up is the albatross (blue cheese). I'm off carbs so I didn't try anything - they are very generous with samples usually so try whatever sounds interesting!

Holly - my wife bought 4 pieces two weeks ago and still has two left - that difference between us is probably why my weight is a multiple of hers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nice stuff!

If I'm not mistaken "ras al hanout" is Arabic for "everything in the spice store".....

yes. a quick search shows it's a spice blend. I guess it's like the north African equivalent of "curry powder"

Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I like the Kampot peppercorns and I have found that they have a slight "piney" flavor that is very pronounced when they are combined with sweet stuff.

I have used them in my chai spice mix with excellent results.

I do wish I could eat regular chocolate but the reaction I have forbids it. No problems with cocoa but chocolate and even "white chocolate" affect me adversely.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So is the "Dude, Sweet," moniker have some sort of meaning for the owners or is it just a catchy name they came up with. I think of "Dude" and chocolates in Texas and I'm not sure I see the link over to the style of confections they offer.

Sounds like a play on "Toute Suite", not that it has any confectionery connotation either that I know of.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

had two more pieces from the box. Parique and Miso Happy. I wasn't so happy with Miso Happy. I was expecting more from this, but really didn't find it all that interesting. Didn't get as much of the tahini flavor as I thought I would. Just some of the black sesame. The Parique was very good. A bit of a sweetness to it.

I also cut off a piece of the Kampot chocolate bar. The flavor here is not at all shy. Very strong pepper flavor. I'm a fan of black pepper, so this is right up my alley. The chocolate is really good, too. You don't need much of this to bar to get your fix. Good thing too, considering it set me back $6. Gonna make this last.

Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tonight, I finish off the box with the Black Gold and the Irish Channel. The Black Gold seemed to have the most chocolate hit of all the pieces in the box. Something about the mushrooms must have really enhanced it. It had a bit of earthiness to it. As a big dark chocolate fan, I think this one worked really well. It had the best chocolate hit out of all the pieces in the box. When I saw the description on the Irish Channel, I got a little worried. Laphroaig is certainly an acquired taste. Even for someone who really likes drinking. And pine? That can be strong. Well.. This one just didn't work for me. Just didn't like it at all.

For the most part, the flavors were not quite as strong was I thought they might be. They were more subtle. Not that that is a bad thing. Overall, I think it worked out pretty well. Next time I make it down that way for a second run at BBQ, I will swing by the shop and buy a box of the "Sweet"

Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So is the "Dude, Sweet," moniker have some sort of meaning for the owners or is it just a catchy name they came up with. I think of "Dude" and chocolates in Texas and I'm not sure I see the link over to the style of confections they offer.

The Cooking Channel did a profile of Dude Sweet on their show "Foodcrafters" a few weeks ago. The owner, Katherine Clapner, seems to be a bit of the renegade type. As she says herself that she chose the town where she opened her shop because she "wanted a neighborhood where rules are not important." "Dude Sweet" refers to her view of males and females, Dudes & Sweets, and her flavor collection is divided into these two categories to reflect that. The "Sweets" are more delicate, flowery flavors; rosepetal jam, lavendar, passion fruit. The "Dudes" are more "aggressive"; tobacco & cognac, black garlic & mushrooms, Irish Whisky. I think it's a pretty clever concept that fits her personality and the flavors are pretty intriguing, although I haven't had the opportunity to try any yet.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So is the "Dude, Sweet," moniker have some sort of meaning for the owners or is it just a catchy name they came up with. I think of "Dude" and chocolates in Texas and I'm not sure I see the link over to the style of confections they offer.

The Cooking Channel did a profile of Dude Sweet on their show "Foodcrafters" a few weeks ago. The owner, Katherine Clapner, seems to be a bit of the renegade type. As she says herself that she chose the town where she opened her shop because she "wanted a neighborhood where rules are not important." "Dude Sweet" refers to her view of males and females, Dudes & Sweets, and her flavor collection is divided into these two categories to reflect that. The "Sweets" are more delicate, flowery flavors; rosepetal jam, lavendar, passion fruit. The "Dudes" are more "aggressive"; tobacco & cognac, black garlic & mushrooms, Irish Whisky. I think it's a pretty clever concept that fits her personality and the flavors are pretty intriguing, although I haven't had the opportunity to try any yet.

Hi Tony! Welcome to the eGullet Society. Thank you for becoming one of our newest members. We're glad to have you here.

Thanks for providing some good background on "Dude, Sweet". I don't get Cooking Channel on my cable lineup, so don't get to see "Food Crafters". To be honest, I was hoping it really WAS a reference to "Dude, Where's My Car". :wink: Do you live in the Dallas area? If you, you should get down there one day and check them out. It's a neat shop. I'm glad that Dallas can have a unique place like this.

Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Jeff. Thanks for the welcome. I've been reading these forums for a while. Not sure why I didn't sign up earlier. But I'm looking forward to participating in this community.

I uploaded the "Foodcrafters" segment on Dude Sweet to YouTube if anyone is interested in seeing it.

I'm actually not anywhere near Dallas. I'm in Southern California. But I would defintely love to visit Dallas one day.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Two thoughts here, firstly that this isn't he sort of place I'd imagine in Dallas, purely based upon stereotype and no personal experience! But maybe it's my turn to get my own back for years of (quite often justified!) digs at British food.

Secondly - $12 sounds quite reasonable, even taking into account the fluctuating exchange rates (I can never keep track), it would be a lot more expensive in the UK. It's a bit cheaper than what you would get in a middle market chain operation (something like Hotel Chocolat or Montezumas) over here. Even if not everything is a hit, I'd be happy to pay for something that is at least a bit interesting.

Edited by Carlovski (log)

I love animals.

They are delicious.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By artiesel
      Has anyone successfully made candied chestnuts (marrons glace) at home which even remotely resemble the professional ones you get from Europe?
       
      I've tried making them using RTE Chinese chestnuts from Costco with varying success:
      One batch became leathery after being simmered in (what started out as) simple syrup which had its sucrose concentration gradually increased.
       
      I have also tried soaking the chestnuts in hot water prior to beginning the candying process.  The nuts, once again, developed a tough skin after a few days.  To reverse the tough skins I added more water to the syrup, broke the nuts up into pieces and simmered them gently for a few hours.
      While some pieces have a tough skin, many of them have taken on a candied texture.
       
      Should any further attempts to candy chestnuts be attempted using the method of slowly simmering them in simple syrup?
       
      Please share any feedback ypu may have.  Thanks!
    • By KTM
      Hello friends,
       
      We recently got our selmi plus ex and have had a handful of successful runs. So far mostly with our enrobing line. 
       
      Theres been 2 occasions now that I have noticed when tempering the machine is cooling past the target temp. When it does this it goes down into the 28c range and the screw pump has to shut off due to the temp and viscosity. 
       
      I also noticed the manual is pretty light on operational procedures. 
       
      The 2 things I can think of that might be causing this other then an equipment error is 
      the chocolate used is to thick or there is a build up of chocolate around the temperature probe near the faucet. 
       
      Wondering if anyone else has had this issue before. 
    • By ShylahSinger
      Hello! I'm fairly new to this site so I don't know if my search was weak. I'm trying to find a way to make Mandarin orange puree at home, but I couldn't find anything even similar in the forum. I am a home cook, but I have been making chocolate bonbons and other confections for over 4 years (intermitantly). It is too expensive for me to purchase this online- not because of the price of the puree, but the cost of shipping makes it prohibative. The recipes I've seen online are all differant and don't seem to be what I need. 
      I would love any help with this! I look forward to hearing and learning from those who have much, much more experience than me. Thanks!
    • By Darienne
      A quite unusual take on the favorite American chocolate bar: click
    • By ShylahSinger
      Help! I am an amateur and make chocolate truffles, bonbons, and caramels for friends and family. I made some soft caramel for filling molded bonbons. The flavor and consistency are fine, but the caramel is filled with bubbles. I don't know how to get the air bubbles out, and am concerned using it in my molded chocolates. I would like to know if it is okay to use. I have been making confections for about four years and this is the first time this has happened. I would really appreciate any help! I'm new to the forum and don't know anyone yet.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...