• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Jstern35

The Bread Topic (2009 – 2014)

581 posts in this topic

This next bread is called "Warm Comfort Bread"..its a sour dough, no added yeast bread. So far, I am 3 for 3 for breads using a starter. ALL DUDS.

This would be better called "Round Door Stop Boule" :wacko:

door_stop.jpg

Oh well can't win them all.

Well, just tasted my doorstop and guess what ? Its got a good taste ! It has a hint of sourdough, the sweet potato comes thru, all and all not bad. The dark spots are indeed burt and bitter but they are only on the top skin.

I am really enjoying baking bread. :smile:


edited for grammar & spelling. I do it 95% of my posts so I'll state it here. :)

"I have never developed indigestion from eating my words."-- Winston Churchill

Talk doesn't cook rice. ~ Chinese Proverb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I made my first brioche this past weekend. I made the sausage stuffed brioche from Keller's Bouchon book.

Good gosh what a lot of butter!

Good gosh what a great bread! It came out delicious.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can someone tell me what causes my bread to bake up like this? It does not happen all the time, and it tastes fine, but it doesn't look so great:

bread.jpg


Frank in Austin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Frank.

My loaves often do something similar. I put it down to hot (or cool) spots in the oven, but I haven't yet been scientific enough to work out exactly what's happening and where.

It probably helps that my bread tastes fabulous.


Leslie Craven, aka "lesliec"
Host, eG Forumslcraven@egstaff.org

After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relatives ~ Oscar Wilde

My eG Foodblog

eGullet Ethics Code signatory

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whoa. Posting a first-ever loaf on this thread is ... intimidating.

But I'm looking past that, because I made bread. Real bread. And I'm excited about it, dangit! It's the Anadama from BBA. I've never had anadama before, so I don't really know what it's supposed to taste like but if it's supposed to taste good, then I think I did it right (I'm from Texas - anadama's a New England thing, right? Or am I just woefully uninformed?). I probably haven't even noticed a bunch of things that I didn't do right, but right now, I don't mind a bit.

Anadama small.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

so I don't really know what it's supposed to taste like but if it's supposed to taste good, then I think I did it right.

Anadama small.jpg

Rico, it look great, nice air pockets inside, I'm not familiar with this particular bread however I'd say you hit it out of the park!


edited for grammar & spelling. I do it 95% of my posts so I'll state it here. :)

"I have never developed indigestion from eating my words."-- Winston Churchill

Talk doesn't cook rice. ~ Chinese Proverb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It looks great, especially for your first go around! There's something special about one's first loaf of homemade bread. There's a moment when you just knowthat making bread is going to be one of your great pleasures. My first loaf was a dismal failure, but I fell in love with breadmaking that day.

I've got the dough in the fridge for Artisan Breads everyday, Butterflake rolls. They'll get baked off Saturday morning.


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks! I'm still kinda new at this bread thing, but I knew I could get help here!


Frank in Austin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rose Levy Beranbaum's Banana Feather Bread

I made it free formed in a feather pattern, at lest that was my attempt :smile:

It looks great, smells great, the taste well I think it is going to be great. Here's why the "THINK"

When I did the sponge, I let it sit for only 15 minutes and then put the flower mixture on. Rose says to let the sponge sit for an hour before putting flour mixture on, or if you'd like, let the sponge "work" for 8-24 hours to develop more flavor, before putting flour mixture on. Realizing that I had not followed directions and her suggestion to let the sponge 'work', I decided that I would let it sit with flour mixture on top of the sponge, leaving it for 20 hours on my kitchen counter. Again, had I read and followed her instructions, it says after a hour to put in the fridge for anywhere between 8-24 hours to coax more flavor.

Ahhhh, cooking 101...read the recipe once through or more, till one understands what one is making and how to make it. !

My kitchen is cool, it sat in the mixer's SS bowl, so fingers crossed it came out alright.

Banana Feather BreadII_RLB.jpg


Edited by Aloha Steve (log)

edited for grammar & spelling. I do it 95% of my posts so I'll state it here. :)

"I have never developed indigestion from eating my words."-- Winston Churchill

Talk doesn't cook rice. ~ Chinese Proverb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Savory Asiago, Apple & Rosemary Bread

I substituted Gruyère for the Asiago. The crust is super but I think I did not let the bread cool long enough before cutting and eating. I think tomorrow it will be more tasty.

Savory Asiago Apple & Rosemary bread.jpg


edited for grammar & spelling. I do it 95% of my posts so I'll state it here. :)

"I have never developed indigestion from eating my words."-- Winston Churchill

Talk doesn't cook rice. ~ Chinese Proverb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm in the middle of testing a new recipe for honey whole wheat that uses a somewhat bastardized form of Peter Reinhart's epoxy method. Considering the overall hydration is something like 78% (!) it will hopefully bring about a nice, springy loaf.

I'll try and post a photo if my camera doesn't hate me too much tomorrow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Savory Asiago, Apple & Rosemary Bread

I substituted Gruyère for the Asiago. The crust is super but I think I did not let the bread cool long enough before cutting and eating. I think tomorrow it will be more tasty.

Savory Asiago Apple & Rosemary bread.jpg

I really tried to like it. Had a little piece last night and today. Cut the top off thru the rest away, figured the Muffin top theory, tried a little piece that way.........its history, Round Filed it all. :hmmm:

Can't win them all......gonna get back on the horse tonight and make something from P.R.'s ABED


Edited by Aloha Steve (log)

edited for grammar & spelling. I do it 95% of my posts so I'll state it here. :)

"I have never developed indigestion from eating my words."-- Winston Churchill

Talk doesn't cook rice. ~ Chinese Proverb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay. I need some help here. Can someone make this and tell me what you think? I think that the method plus the ingredients are what gives me the bread, but I need a confirmed second opinion that it's good.

What we're going for here is a 100% sandwich wheat bread that isn't too heavy, is soft enough for peanut butter, and my 2 year old won't turn her nose up at. She likes white breads, loves sourdough and light rye, but she's stuck on this no whole grain thing.

I'll put the ingredients as I used them and then the baker's percentages (roughly) next to them. It's enough for one 8.5x4.5 loaf and a few rolls, so the entire recipe would probably work in a slightly larger pan.

A couple things to keep in mind. I use instant yeast here. Also, my kitchen temperature is about 68-70 degrees. My milk was cold from the fridge and my water was room temperature and bottled. My butter was half melted, half not. None of this was completely scientific. Had it been, I would've been able to calculate for 500g of flour instead of 550g. :rolleyes:

Soaker

200g (36%) whole wheat flour (KA or other finely milled)

115g (21%) white whole wheat (KA or other finely milled)

35g (6%) gluten flour (I used Arrowhead Mills)

260g (47%) milk (I used 1%)

Mix together all ingredients so that the flours are thoroughly moistened and set aside for at least an hour at room temperature.

Biga

200g (37%) whole wheat flour

150g (27%) water

5g (1%) instant yeast

Mix together all ingredients in a separate bowl from above and set aside for an hour or so, also at room temperature.

Final Dough

all soaker

all biga

50g (9%) butter

75g (14%) honey

12g (2%) salt

25g (5%) milk

Break up both the soaker and biga into small pieces and put in the bowl of a stand mixer. Add the butter, honey, salt, and milk into the middle of the pieces and turn the machine on low until they are starting to become incorporated into the dough and the dough itself is starting to stick a bit more to the dough hook. Once it starts to become dough, move up to medium-low speed (3 on my KA Pro) and go for about 4 minutes. It doesn't really take too long to become a nice dough due to the long autolyse that all the flour got.

I did 2 letter folds (pat or stretch out dough and fold in thirds like a letter, both top to bottom and left to right) at 30 minute intervals through the bulk fermentation, which takes about 2 hours. After the second fold let the dough completely double in size before moving on.

Once fermented, split the dough into enough for a loaf (750g or so is what I used) and a few rolls (I did one long free form batard). Proof until almost double, or about an hour. Score or not, brush with butter or not, and then bake in a 350 degree oven for 30 minutes (your rolls should probably be done now), then turn the oven down to 325 degrees and bake for another 10 or so minutes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Authentic Pumpernickel w Raisins RLB Bread Bible

Came out, I think, exactly as Rose meant it to. I weight the doug before first proof, she said it was supposed to weigh 29.2 ounces (from memory) mine weighted 29.5 :biggrin:

Deep, rich, earthy taste, offset with the raisins and sesame seeds. My favorite type of bread.

Authentic_pumpernickel.jpg

Authentic_PumpernickelRLB.jpg


edited for grammar & spelling. I do it 95% of my posts so I'll state it here. :)

"I have never developed indigestion from eating my words."-- Winston Churchill

Talk doesn't cook rice. ~ Chinese Proverb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Steve, have you ever made the pumpernickel in Baking with Julia? We made it recently and it was fantastic. Just curious to get a comparison. We don't have RLB's bread book.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Steve, have you ever made the pumpernickel in Baking with Julia? We made it recently and it was fantastic. Just curious to get a comparison. We don't have RLB's bread book.

Katie is the formula called Pumpernickel Loaves or Rustic Pumpernickel ?

I don't have Baking with Julia, but I have found those two recipes.


edited for grammar & spelling. I do it 95% of my posts so I'll state it here. :)

"I have never developed indigestion from eating my words."-- Winston Churchill

Talk doesn't cook rice. ~ Chinese Proverb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The recipe in Baking with Julia is Pumpernickel Loaves. If your head starts to spin looking at the list of ingredients, that's probably the one. The addition of prune lekvar to the bread dough astounded me. We had just been given some home-made fig goop by relatives for the holidays, so we subbed that.

If lekvar is a new one for you (my husband was completely baffled) it's a thick fruit paste that's used as filling for pastries, cookies, etc. If you've eaten a prune danish, you've had it. I would guess that any thick fruit butter could be used if you don't want to take the trouble to make prune butter, which I didn't. However, it isn't difficult or expensive to make, but is pricey to buy or mail order. I imagine it's easier to buy a bag of pitted prunes in Hawaii than it is to buy a jar of lekvar. Apple or apricot butter might be good too in this bread. Actually the fig paste we were given was a bit bland and I was just as glad to use it up. We're only talking 1/2 cup for two VERY big loaves of bread. Given that this bread takes a certain commitment, I would consider making prune or apricot butter for next time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is my first loaf i've done in a long time and I've done a couple before really. This on is my first with a biga and the first time I've used steam in the oven. Pretty pleased with how it's come out.

I used mostly white flour with a little wholemeal and a few poppy seeds thrown in and made 2 smallish loaves.

IMG_2999.JPG

IMG_3000.JPG

IMG_3001.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Steve, have you ever made the pumpernickel in Baking with Julia? We made it recently and it was fantastic. Just curious to get a comparison. We don't have RLB's bread book.

Hi Katie, I've looked over the recipe and its ingredients are similar but different. The plain yogurt, vegetable shortening & prune lekva are not in the one I made. The yogurt and solid vegetable shortening (Crisco) are off putting to me. The prune lekva sounds like it would taste terrific, in bread, on bread or a bit on a spoon ! :biggrin:

To answer your question directly I don't have any comparison as I have not made or tasted it.


Edited by Aloha Steve (log)

edited for grammar & spelling. I do it 95% of my posts so I'll state it here. :)

"I have never developed indigestion from eating my words."-- Winston Churchill

Talk doesn't cook rice. ~ Chinese Proverb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought and just received my new and LAST, so help me, bread book. :raz:

"Bread: A Baker's Book of Techniques and Recipes" by Jeffrey Hamelman. He is the Bakery Director at King Arthur Flour and for better or worse I've married myself to KAF products.

I made his Semolina bread today, with sesame seeds and my wife said, after it cooled on the rack: "Close your eyes, a little more seeds, you would think we were eating bread in Paris" I agree the bread is fantastic. While I find the text book (teaching) part difficult, I bought it for the recipes and the first one, is a Superbowl contender.

semiolina_sea.jpg

The bottom is not dark like in my poor picture. Great oven spring in this bread.

Semolina.jpg


edited for grammar & spelling. I do it 95% of my posts so I'll state it here. :)

"I have never developed indigestion from eating my words."-- Winston Churchill

Talk doesn't cook rice. ~ Chinese Proverb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whew, it's been a long time since I posted something here.

Today I had my first tangible success with a whole-grain bread!

The recipe I used is from a Jeff Basom. I found the recipe online here. This is a bit of a departure for me, because I am normally all about the weights and reproducibility. None the less, It seems to have worked out ok.

The dough is made with 2 cups (I know! cups!) of whole grains (I used a mixture of brown rice, barley and moong dal), and I sprinkled the top with Kalonji seeds instead of using the glaze he recommends in the recipe.

This recipe is definitely a keeper. The only think I will change for next time is to use a higher oven temperature than 350. The crust doesn't get that nice foxy brown color before the inside is up to 210F.

Anyway, here are the two loafs I made:

gallery_59916_6220_1059.jpg

gallery_59916_6220_18562.jpg

gallery_59916_6220_128830.jpg

I just made this bread and it came out great - probably my best loaf of bread to date. Thanks!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Steve, have you ever made the pumpernickel in Baking with Julia? We made it recently and it was fantastic. Just curious to get a comparison. We don't have RLB's bread book.

Hi Katie, I've looked over the recipe and its ingredients are similar but different. The plain yogurt, vegetable shortening & prune lekva are not in the one I made. The yogurt and solid vegetable shortening (Crisco) are off putting to me. The prune lekva sounds like it would taste terrific, in bread, on bread or a bit on a spoon ! :biggrin:

To answer your question directly I don't have any comparison as I have not made or tasted it.

Whenever I have a recipe that calls for vegetable shortening I substitute butter. I checked out the video and found it interesting how they used a sling made out of a kitchen towel to hold the loaf while it was rising. Does anyone here do that?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just made this bread and it came out great - probably my best loaf of bread to date. Thanks!!

Glad it worked out for you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Similar Content

    • By Shel_B
      Not sure if the subject line really reflects the situation and my question.
       
      Sweetie made a couple of loaves of soda bread the other day, and cut the top of the loaf in order to make a pattern something like THIS.  However, the pattern or cut mark didn't show on the finished loaf.  I don't know much more other than she said she made the cut "pretty deep."
       
      What might be the cause of the cut mark not showing on the finished loaf?  Thanks!
    • By nonkeyman
       How to Make Rye Sourdough Bread
      I don't know what it is about bread, but it is my favorite thing to make and eat. A freshly baked loaf of bread solves a world of problems. I was lucky enough to get to be one of the main bakers when I worked at the Herbfarm. We baked Epi, Baguettes, Rolls, Pretzels and so much more.
       

      Rye Sourdough Wood Oven Baked Bread
       
      My fondest memory when I worked there was our field trip to the Bread Lab(wait something this cool came out of WSU, of course!) here in Washington. They grow thousands of varieties of wheat and have some pretty cool equipment to test gluten levels, protein, genetics and so on. I nerded out so hard.
       
      What came out of that trip was this bread. Now I can't recall the exact flour we got from them, but using a basic bread and rye will do the trick. We used to get a special flour for our 100 mile menu. This was where we were limited to only serving food from 100 miles away. So finding a wheat farm that made actual hulled wheat in 100 miles was a miracle. The year before...the thing we made, was closer to hard tack.
       
      Now if you don't have a starter, I recommend starting one! It is a great investment!
       
      Rye Sourdough
      1000 g flour (60% Bread Flour, 40% Rye)
      25 g salt
       
      75 g of honey/molasses
      200 g of Rye starter 
      650 g of water, cold
      Equipment
      Baker Scale (or other gram scale)
      Bench Cutter
      Bread Razor (you could also use one of those straight razors)
       
      Start by taking the cold water, yeast and Honey and mix together and let sit for 10-15 minutes
       
      I know, some of you just freaked out, cold water? Won't that kill the yeast.
       
      Nope, the yeast just needs to re hydrate. I prefer using cold water to slow the yeast down. That way the lactobacillus in the starter has  a good amount of time to start making lactic acid, and really get to flavor town!
       
      While that is sitting, I mix the flour and the salt together(How many times I have forgotten to salt the bread).
       
      Now mix the two products with a kneading hook for 3-5 minutes, only until thoroughly mixed but not yet at the window pane stage of kneading.
       
       
      Instead, place into a bowl and set a timer for one hour. Then when that hour is up, push the dough down and fold all the corners in
       
      Repeat this step 2-3 more times, pending on the outside temperature.
       
      If you happen to have those cool bowls to shape round loafs! Awesome, use them. I would break the boules into 3 balls of about 333 grams
       
      If not then just put the dough in the fridge and do the steps below the next day.
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
      Once you have bouled the bread, can put it into the fridge and let it sit over night
       
      Again, this lets the bacteria, really get to work(misconception is the yeast adds the sour flavor, nope, think yogurt!)
       
      Now on the next day, heat up whatever form of oven you plan to use. We used a brick oven but if you just have a normal oven, that is fine. Crank it to 450 degrees Fahrenheit.
       
      If you have not bouled your bread yet, go back and watch the video and break the dough down into three balls of abut 333 grams. Then place the balls on a lightly greased sheet pan. Let sit for about 45 minutes to 1 hour.

      If you have used the fancy bowls then turn the the bread out on a lightly greased sheet pan, without the bowl and let temper for 15-30 minutes.
       
       
      If your oven is steam injected, build up a good blast of steam.
       
      If not, throw in a few ice cubes and close the door or put a bath of hot water inside.
       
      The steam is what creates the sexy crust!
       
      Let it build up for a few minutes!
       
      Right before you put the bread into the oven use a bread razor to slice the top of the bread.
       
      Place the dough balls into the oven and douse with another blast of steam or ice and close the oven.
       
      Let them bake for 13 minutes at 450 degrees. Then turn the loaves and bake for another 10 minutes.
       
      Remove when the crust is as dark as you want and the internal temperature exceeds 190 degrees Fahrenheit.
       
      Now pull out and make sure to let cool off of the sheet pan with room to breath underneath. You don't want your crust steaming!
       
      Now here is the hardest part, wait at least 20 minutes before getting into the bread. Also, cutting into bread to early really seems to come out poorly. I would rip the bread until 1-2 hours has passed.
       
      Now serve it with your favorite butter, goat butter or whipped duck fat!
       
    • By Catherine T
      Hi, I have just discovered and registered on this site. My main cooking and baking concern is that I have been diagnosed with Celiac Disease and haven't been able to eat gluten. BUT I have discovered an exception. When I have visited Continental Europe such as Spain and Russia, I have been able to eat their bread and have had no negative repercussions. Then when I try eating bread in Great Britain and North America I have become sick. My research on the Web has not provided any explanations although I believe the EU has banned GMO grains. I was recently gifted panetonne from a Toronto restaurant called Sud Forno that uses Italian flour and I was able to safely eat it. Another bakery called Forno Cultura advertises that it uses European flour. So I am going to approach them to see if I can buy their flour in bulk. I will let you know how it goes.
    • By borgr
      I want to leave my sourdough (itself, not baked loaves of sourdough bread) for a while (going abroad) but I do not want it to die, can I leave it in the freezer? do you have other ideas?
    • By hazardnc
      Having no local Arabic bakery, I have long hoped to learn to make good khoubz at home. Every time I try, however, my bread is too stiff and tough. I have been successfully making other breads using The Bread Baker's Apprentice, and now wonder if my bread woule benefit from an overnight ferment in the refrigerator.
      FoodMan (and anyone) can you help me?
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.