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carol lang

Eggnog chocolate

22 posts in this topic

Would this work? I made an egg nog vanilla pudding. I used 2 cups of commercial egg nog and 1 package of organic vanilla pudding mix. Cooked it as for pudding. I then piped this filling into a dark chocolate molded shell.

The taste is wonderful but I am wondering if shelf life presents a problem.

I let some pieces sit a room temperature for one week . The texture was fine. There was a slight loss of flavor.

Does anyone have any thoughts on whether or not this is bad idea for a bon bon?

thanks

Carol

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I recently made the "Spiked Eggnog" pieces in Peter Greweling's book. This is a white chocolate ganache flavored with vanilla bean, fresh ground nutmeg, and dark rum. It tastes very close to eggnog (though you might miss the "egg flavor" the Kerry describes if you taste it critically.

Overall, I like the way this ganache tastes and will continue to use it as it seems to have a good shelf life and texture.

Would this work?  I made an egg nog vanilla pudding. I used 2 cups of commercial egg nog and 1 package of organic vanilla pudding mix.  Cooked it as for pudding.  I then piped this filling into a dark chocolate molded shell.

The taste is wonderful but I am wondering  if shelf life presents a problem.

I let some pieces sit a room temperature for one week .  The texture was fine.  There was a slight loss of flavor.

Does anyone have any thoughts on whether or not this is bad idea for a bon bon?

thanks

Carol


Steve Lebowitz

Doer of All Things

Steven Howard Confections

Slicing a warm slab of bacon is a lot like giving a ferret a shave. No matter how careful you are, somebody's going to get hurt - Alton Brown, "Good Eats"

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I recently made the "Spiked Eggnog" pieces in Peter Greweling's book.  This is a white chocolate ganache flavored with vanilla bean, fresh ground nutmeg, and dark rum.  It tastes very close to eggnog (though you might miss the "egg flavor" the Kerry describes if you taste it critically.

Overall, I like the way this ganache tastes and will continue to use it as it seems to have a good shelf life and texture.

Would this work?   I made an egg nog vanilla pudding. I used 2 cups of commercial egg nog and 1 package of organic vanilla pudding mix.   Cooked it as for pudding.   I then piped this filling into a dark chocolate molded shell.

The taste is wonderful but I am wondering  if shelf life presents a problem.

I let some pieces sit a room temperature for one week .  The texture was fine.  There was a slight loss of flavor.

Does anyone have any thoughts on whether or not this is bad idea for a bon bon?

thanks

Carol

Thanks, Ilana and Kerry and lebowitz.

I will try out Greweling  spiked egg nog today.

lebowitz, did you place the ganache on discs as in the recipe or in a molded shell?

Carol

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I also use the Grewling spiked egg nog recipe, substituting brandy for rum and piping into a white chocolate shell.


Tammy's Tastings

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I also use the Grewling spiked egg nog recipe, substituting brandy for rum and piping into a white chocolate shell.

Thanks Tammy,

I am going to try it today and use a dark chocolate shell. Brandy sounds good.

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I'd estimate a really short shelf life for those.  I make a white chocolate ganache using some Harry Hornes or Birds custard powder, advocat for more eggy flavour, rum flavours and nutmeg.

I made the spiked eggnog by Greweling today. Although it had a nice taste, it does fall short of a real egg nog taste.

Kerry, how do you use the custard powder (if I can even get some).

Do you add it to the cream to make the ganache or sprinkle it in after the ganache is made?

Thanks in advance.

Carol

PS could I use the vanilla pudding powder in place of the custard powder?

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I'd estimate a really short shelf life for those.  I make a white chocolate ganache using some Harry Hornes or Birds custard powder, advocat for more eggy flavour, rum flavours and nutmeg.

I made the spiked eggnog by Greweling today. Although it had a nice taste, it does fall short of a real egg nog taste.

Kerry, how do you use the custard powder (if I can even get some).

Do you add it to the cream to make the ganache or sprinkle it in after the ganache is made?

Thanks in advance.

Carol

PS could I use the vanilla pudding powder in place of the custard powder?

I mix the custard powder with cream, heat in the nuke a few seconds at a time mixing well between until it is smooth and cooked. I add to melted white chocolate, then some butter, advocat, glucose and flavourings. I have nutmeg essential oil, just a drop is all you need. I use a couple of drops of the Dr Oetker rum flavouring.

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I recently made the "Spiked Eggnog" pieces in Peter Greweling's book.  This is a white chocolate ganache flavored with vanilla bean, fresh ground nutmeg, and dark rum.  It tastes very close to eggnog (though you might miss the "egg flavor" the Kerry describes if you taste it critically.

Overall, I like the way this ganache tastes and will continue to use it as it seems to have a good shelf life and texture.

Would this work?   I made an egg nog vanilla pudding. I used 2 cups of commercial egg nog and 1 package of organic vanilla pudding mix.   Cooked it as for pudding.   I then piped this filling into a dark chocolate molded shell.

The taste is wonderful but I am wondering  if shelf life presents a problem.

I let some pieces sit a room temperature for one week .  The texture was fine.  There was a slight loss of flavor.

Does anyone have any thoughts on whether or not this is bad idea for a bon bon?

thanks

Carol

Thanks, Ilana and Kerry and lebowitz.

I will try out Greweling  spiked egg nog today.

lebowitz, did you place the ganache on discs as in the recipe or in a molded shell?

Carol

I piped the ganache using a star tip onto chocolate disks. I made the disks using a 25mm stencil I bought from Chef Rubber.


Steve Lebowitz

Doer of All Things

Steven Howard Confections

Slicing a warm slab of bacon is a lot like giving a ferret a shave. No matter how careful you are, somebody's going to get hurt - Alton Brown, "Good Eats"

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I found what turned out to be a really nice egg nog ganache recipe on Tomric's site - clickety click. It's made with egg nog, so it tastes like egg nog. Really nice as a filling for dark chocolate cups topped off with white chocolate foofs and a sprinkling of nutmeg.

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Patty

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I found what turned out to be a really nice egg nog ganache recipe on Tomric's site - clickety click.  It's made with egg nog, so it tastes like egg nog.  Really nice as a filling for dark chocolate cups topped off with white chocolate foofs and a sprinkling of nutmeg.

I'm trying to plug this in to the recipe tester - but I'm not sure where eggnog fits into it. I suspect it will not have a really long shelf life, but given the ingredients - I'll bet it tastes quite wonderful.

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I found what turned out to be a really nice egg nog ganache recipe on Tomric's site - clickety click.  It's made with egg nog, so it tastes like egg nog.  Really nice as a filling for dark chocolate cups topped off with white chocolate foofs and a sprinkling of nutmeg.

I'm trying to plug this in to the recipe tester - but I'm not sure where eggnog fits into it. I suspect it will not have a really long shelf life, but given the ingredients - I'll bet it tastes quite wonderful.

Eep - didn't think about shelf life. How long is not really long?


Patty

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I found what turned out to be a really nice egg nog ganache recipe on Tomric's site - clickety click.  It's made with egg nog, so it tastes like egg nog.  Really nice as a filling for dark chocolate cups topped off with white chocolate foofs and a sprinkling of nutmeg.

I'm trying to plug this in to the recipe tester - but I'm not sure where eggnog fits into it. I suspect it will not have a really long shelf life, but given the ingredients - I'll bet it tastes quite wonderful.

Eep - didn't think about shelf life. How long is not really long?

A week or two should be fine.

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I found what turned out to be a really nice egg nog ganache recipe on Tomric's site - clickety click.  It's made with egg nog, so it tastes like egg nog.  Really nice as a filling for dark chocolate cups topped off with white chocolate foofs and a sprinkling of nutmeg.

I'm trying to plug this in to the recipe tester - but I'm not sure where eggnog fits into it. I suspect it will not have a really long shelf life, but given the ingredients - I'll bet it tastes quite wonderful.

Eep - didn't think about shelf life. How long is not really long?

A week or two should be fine.

Cool - they'll be gone by the end of Thursday, anyway!


Patty

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I've been fiddling a little more with the calculator, they are OK for cocoa butter content, and well over on sugar content - so I suspect it might make up for the slightly high water content. This all assumes I've broken down the contents in eggnog correctly.

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What on earth is a "foof"!!

Also, when it says 228 g eggnog, is this a powder -like custard powder? Or is it a liquid with cream or milk? I am asking becasue we cannot get "eggnog" here. but we canget powder pudding or custard etc so I could try the recipe using that instead of eggnog. I make a recipe that is very close to Kerry's above but that uses cream.

And thanks for the link!


Edited by Lior (log)

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What on earth is a "foof"!!

Also, when it says 228 g eggnog, is this a powder -like custard powder? Or is it a liquid with cream or milk? I am asking becasue we cannot get "eggnog" here. but we canget powder pudding or custard etc so I could try the recipe using that instead of eggnog. I make a recipe that is very close to Kerry's above but that uses cream.

And thanks for the link!

These days eggnog comes in cartons like chocolate milk at holiday time around here. You can make your own with eggs, cream, milk, a bit of sugar, rum, some vanilla and some nutmeg. You can even make it with those eggbeater fake eggs, and it tastes pretty much the same.

Oh and a 'foof' is like a 'poof' - a fluffy decoration!

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Ok, now I see! Good you explained "poof" cause I don't kow that one either!!

So foof and poof-okay....

So the eggnog drink is thick like custard or more like a thick chocolate milk drink? We used to make eggnog ("goggle-moggle") by beating raw eggs and adding hot milk with cinnamon. That was it. Is this similar? Well thanks!! :rolleyes:

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For some reason, the store here only brought in 2% and skim eggnog this year. I drink eggnog and eat fruitcake once a year and they didn't bring in the good stuff this time? grumble, grumble, grumble Eggnog ganache does sound tasty though, I'll have to try it.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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I found what turned out to be a really nice egg nog ganache recipe on Tomric's site - clickety click.  It's made with egg nog, so it tastes like egg nog.  Really nice as a filling for dark chocolate cups topped off with white chocolate foofs and a sprinkling of nutmeg.

Patty.

Thanks for the props on my recipe. The first time I made it, it wasn't quite egg nog season and had to make the nog from scratch. Imagine the shelf life on a praline made with nearly raw eggs!

b

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I found what turned out to be a really nice egg nog ganache recipe on Tomric's site - clickety click. It's made with egg nog, so it tastes like egg nog. Really nice as a filling for dark chocolate cups topped off with white chocolate foofs and a sprinkling of nutmeg.

Does anyone have a working link to this recipe, or maybe have it saved and could post it here? I'd love to try it but can't find it on the site. Of course this was posted here in 2008 so I'm only 5 years late to the party. Thanks!

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