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Favorite uses for Boursin?

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Hi all,

I was gifted with a round of Boursin "garlic and fine herbs" cheese product, which is not a usual ingredient in my cooking arsenal. I'm sure I could just swipe it on crackers, but any other tried-and-true ideas (or inspired ideas) for how to use this would be much appreciated. Thanks!

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If you make grits, add it to the grits and that let cool.. The roll into balls and fry..

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I recently used it with Kalamata olives as a stuffing for chicken breasts. Very good.

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As a filling for cherry tomatoes....you may need to thin it with a little cream first.

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Reduce chicken stock and heavy cream to it coat's back of spoon. Whisk in Boursin for a nice fat free sauce for chicken and fish. Okay... not fat free but very good.


Edited by robert40 (log)

Robert R

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Crumble into a potato & green onion fritatta, or into hot orzo with ham/pancetta

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Add it to fettucine with shrimp or chicken. Amazing!

I have to second this one!!!!


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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1. Add to chicken breasts which are to be prepared en croute.

2. Use in a beef wellington instead of the pate

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Some chain place somewhere fills deep fried breaded mushrooms with this stuff, or deep fried breaded chicken breasts. I don't remember where, or when, but I do remember the chicken rocking my socks.

I would imagine a light pounding, rolled around some frozen Bourisn, ala Kiev style, then rolled in panko or however you bread your cutlets, and fried would be pretty darn good! Or, in mushrooms if you like 'em.

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Yowza! You all are awesome! :biggrin: How is it that I've never had Boursin when it seems to be so versatile?!

One question: the fettuccine +protein + Boursin......is there anything else required to create a sauce? Milk? Stock/broth? Or is it simply meant to melt on its own?

I'm never terribly skilled at stuffing chicken, but freezing the Boursin before stuffing sounds like a marvelous idea.

Boursin-stuffed tomatoes.....a good, simple appetizer idea for upcoming social engagements.

Eggs and Boursin sounds good.......I've recently tried scrambled eggs with a little Neufchatel crumbled in, so I bet that the Boursin will be fantastic! Especially if I have some Boursin grits on the side..... :wink:

Oh, and welcome ErikaK! Your suggestion will have me use up some scallions that are languishing in my produce drawer......

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Possibilities are endless, really...

You could make a compound butter with it and place a tablespoon on a steak while it's resting after the cooking process. You could bake it in puff pastry, then let it cool and enjoy at room temperature. You could throw chunks of it into a caramelized onion or leek tart. You could incorporate it into your favourite creamy dip (artichoke and spinach being a good place to start). It all depends on your imagination!

I really like the stuffed, deep fried mushroom idea though!

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Slice 2 lbs of red potatoes thinly. Place half in a baking dish. Season. Combine 1 cup cream and your boursin in a small saucepan and heat until the cheese melts. Pour half of the cream mix over the potatoes, top with remaining potatoes, season, and pour on the remaining cream mix. Bake in 350 oven for 1 hour, uncovered.

I make these for Christmas dinner every year. They are fabulous.


Stop Family Violence

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Possibilities are endless, really...

You could make a compound butter with it and place a tablespoon on a steak while it's resting after the cooking process. You could bake it in puff pastry, then let it cool and enjoy at room temperature. You could throw chunks of it into a caramelized onion or leek tart. You could incorporate it into your favourite creamy dip (artichoke and spinach being a good place to start). It all depends on your imagination!

I really like the stuffed, deep fried mushroom idea though!

I want to try every one of your suggestions. In the same meal. :wub:

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Love it on a perfectly medium-rare burger with a little bit of Dijon mustard as well.


Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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I just couldn't imagine it ever getting as far as cooking. I would have eaten the whole thing by then. It's possibly my favourite cheese.


"Alternatively, marry a good man or woman, have plenty of children, and train them to do it while you drink a glass of wine and grow a moustache." -Moby Pomerance

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If you make grits, add it to the grits and that let cool.. The roll into balls and fry..

Along those lines I have a grits casserole recipe that calls for it.

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Hollow out cherry tomatos, a a few crumbles of bacon, add Boursin and stick under the broiler just until the cheese gets melty. DO NOT serve these at parties. Other people eat them and then there is less for you. :sad:

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Boursin makes the best baked stuffed potatoes. Bake a potato, hollow it out, mix the inside of the potato with some boursin, put it back in the potato and then bake again at 350F for about 30 minutes. Or you can just add boursin to your favorite mashed potato recipe.

Somewhere I also saw a recipe for baked stuffed artichokes that used boursin.

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Fine Cooking ran this a while back: smashed red potatoes, with Boursin (plus a little cream) and scallions. Yum.

If you have any leftovers, they make great potato patties (or pucks, if you're eating at my house), fried in butter in a non-stick pan.


Margo Thompson

Allentown, PA

You're my little potato, you're my little potato,

You're my little potato, they dug you up!

You come from underground!

-Malcolm Dalglish

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Get some good crackers (stone-ground wheat things, or garlic bagel chips, or really any cracker you like), spread with the boursin, top with smoked salmon. Makes a fabulous, easy lunch or snack or hors d'oeuvre.

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Seriously, I am with Natho -- it never makes it to cooking. It barely makes it to a cracker! Sometimes I barely even manage to get a knife before swiping at it with my fingers... MMMMMM! Oh, though my other favorite way to eat it is to hollow out some mushroom caps, spritz with olive oil, stuff with boursin, and bake at around 375 until boursin is browned -- ridiculously easy and delicious appetizer!

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We use the Boursin with black pepper as a party nibble, simply spread it down the centre hollow of a celery stick, from the heart, and then cut with a hot sharp knife on the bias..........MMmmmm cheese!


"It's true I crept the boards in my youth, but I never had it in my blood, and that's what so essential isn't it? The theatrical zeal in the veins. Alas, I have little more than vintage wine and memories." - Montague Withnail.

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