Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

"Making Artisan Chocolates" by Andrew Shotts


choux
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • 3 weeks later...

Getting back to an earlier posting about corn syrup...glucose. At the grocery store I can buy a 250mL bottle of corn syrup. when I go to Michaels they sell that small tub of glucose which in small print has "corn syrup" My question is: Does the glucose tub at Michaels have less water content than the bottle of Lily White Corn syrup at the grocery store?

Second question is in regards to Sqwerls post about invert sugar Nuveline(? possibly misspelled!) Which is better to use: corn syrup or the invert sugar?

Hey I finally got my book! oh yeah, oh yeah!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

while for the most part, corn syrup and glucose can be used interchangeably in recipes calling for one or the other...it is my understanding that invert sugar (known by name brands: trimoline, nuvoline, etc.) cannot be used in place of corn syrup or glucose. it is a different ingredient which will give you different results.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Quite a few of the ganache recipes call for small amounts of cocoa butter (about 1/4 oz.). Since cocoa butter is not easy to source in Australia, can I simply sub a bit of heavy cream for the cocoa butter, or just leave it out altogether? I realise that either way, there will be a change in the texture of the final product. Would it be worth my while trying to track down some cocoa butter? Cheers.

Hi! I'm from Sydney as well, and get my cocoa butter in 850g tubs. I order mine through a company called Deshel, but I think you can also get the same from stores like Essential Ingredient (in Crows Nest).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
  • 3 months later...

So I had some leftover marshmallow from last week (don't forget to grease the parchment!!) and I cut it up to make the Rocky Rhode bars. They are so good!. Only one little hitch, I don't see how 35g of graham crumbs and 35g of PB ganache should cover the bottom of an 8" pan! Unless it was supposed to be paper thin. I doubled the amount and managed to cover the bottom. Drew, if you're still watching this thread, was the amount printed in the book correct?

I love using the g pectin, it makes the gelee the perfect texture every time. My latest favourite is passionfruit with a milk chocolate ganache.

Edited by choux (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

I have a couple of questions for Andrew Shotts. I am trying some of the ganaches from you book and today I did the Lemon grass - coconut ganach. It called for 1 tablespoon of Mojito flavored liqueur. I live in Washington state and the liquor board here controls the types of liquor that we can purchase and I could not find a mojito flavored liqueur. Is there a brand name or trade name for this or could you recommend a substitute? I can get coconut flavored rum and used that but it may not be the same. Any help with this would be appreciated. Fred

Fred Rowe

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In one of the recipes, he suggests using dark rum as a replacement if you can't find the Mojito liqueurs. Mojitos have lime, rum and mint, so coconut rum wouldn't be an equivalent replacement, although it might still taste good!

Tammy's Tastings

Creating unique food and drink experiences

eGullet Foodblogs #1 and #2
Dinner for 40

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pamela Wilkinson

www.portlandfood.org

Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

Way "back in the day" duckduck wrote:

The mango mint coriander was really nice. It doesn't scream mango but the three flavors work really well together. It's nice and delicate.

I just got this book today and was thinking of having a go at these when my molds arrive next week: I really like mango, and like Greweling's technique of using pureé that has reduced by half. Do you think that doing that in this case would work to give more mango flavor, maybe with a slight modification to the amount of cream to account for the water missing from the pureé? I know, I'm probably not advanced enough to be making modifications to recipes yet... oh, well... that has never stopped me before! :smile:

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To get good mango flavour I start with the puree, add some of either freeze dried mango or a Phillipine powdered mango mixture I have, plus a bit of mango compound. And a bit of citric acid.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have made these using a hot chili oil. I also have infusec olive oil with cut up habaneros. They both worked fine. Might have to add a couple extra drops to get a good bite.

BTW wasn't the recipe from Greweling.

Mark

www.roseconfections.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Chris - I think the point of using the oil is to address the consistency issue you had with your batch of Habanos - when you use fresh habaneros, the level of heat can vary quite dramatically from batch to batch. A habanero (or other chile) oil will let you reproduce results exactly from time to time. So if you're in a rush to make your truffles, you could just infuse your cream with habanero and take your chances, rather than looking for the oil.

Tammy's Tastings

Creating unique food and drink experiences

eGullet Foodblogs #1 and #2
Dinner for 40

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, I'm definitely in favor of using the oils, I am just wondering what the stuff *is*. In the image in the book it looks like a nearly-perfectly clear liquid, which certainly does not describe the various "hot-sauce" type products, or even "hot oil" type products, I have seen. That, and the local Wegman's was out of habañeros last night. Doh! :smile:

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Chris I have made both of them, spacing out on recipes & source.

Wasn't impressed with Habanero from Greweling. Might have to let cream steep for a longer time.

The South of the Border, I have made with both hot chili oil & habanero oil that I made. I believe that color of the oil will change with the source of the infused ingrediant. The habanero oil i made is just a bit darker than the olive oil used (been sitting for a couple of months now). The hardest part of making the truffle is chopping the pinneapple small enough. Not sure if bite at end comes from habanero oil or the chili powder used to decorate (would change with different types of chili powder available. I like the taste very much & would consider using them in truffles that I sell.

gallery_45240_3105_11573.jpg

Had a problem getting a sharp focus.

Edited by mrose (log)

Mark

www.roseconfections.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By ShylahSinger
      Hello! I'm fairly new to this site so I don't know if my search was weak. I'm trying to find a way to make Mandarin orange puree at home, but I couldn't find anything even similar in the forum. I am a home cook, but I have been making chocolate bonbons and other confections for over 4 years (intermitantly). It is too expensive for me to purchase this online- not because of the price of the puree, but the cost of shipping makes it prohibative. The recipes I've seen online are all differant and don't seem to be what I need. 
      I would love any help with this! I look forward to hearing and learning from those who have much, much more experience than me. Thanks!
    • By Darienne
      A quite unusual take on the favorite American chocolate bar: click
    • By ShylahSinger
      Help! I am an amateur and make chocolate truffles, bonbons, and caramels for friends and family. I made some soft caramel for filling molded bonbons. The flavor and consistency are fine, but the caramel is filled with bubbles. I don't know how to get the air bubbles out, and am concerned using it in my molded chocolates. I would like to know if it is okay to use. I have been making confections for about four years and this is the first time this has happened. I would really appreciate any help! I'm new to the forum and don't know anyone yet.
    • By rookie
      I am making molded bunnies for Easter and I am finding that the
      necks are cracking and the head breaks away from the body. I have noticed that the neck is not as thick as the rest of the bunny. Total grams for this bunny is 200.
      Does anyone have any suggestions on how to rectify this? Oh yeah I didn't mention that after pouring into molds I place in the refridgerator.
      Any suggestions are welcome!
      Cheers
      Mary - Rookie
    • By cc.canuck
      I couldn't think of a better way to word that! 
       
      I'm experimenting with adding a very small amount of cocoa butter decoration onto bars I'm making and am not sure whether I should heat the moulds up with a hair dryer as I would for completely bare moulds or just abandoning this step. I would avoid blowing directly onto where the cocoa butter is as much as possible. Thoughts?

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...