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RonC

7-Grain Bread

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Suppose I could adapt one of my own recipes, but, hey, I'd love to see your successful ones for 7-grain bread. Hate to be picky, but I don't use a bread machine so those aren't needed.

Thanks much!

Sidecar Ron

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Suppose I could adapt one of my own recipes, but, hey, I'd love to see your successful ones for 7-grain bread. Hate to be picky, but I don't use a bread machine so those aren't needed.

Thanks much!

Sidecar Ron

PM me your e-mail address and I'll send it to you via mastercook. I'm too lazy to type it all out.

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While you guys are at it, I'd love to get hold of a tried & true recipe for a really dense, heavy, dark multigrain bread (not plain pumpernickel) baked in a bread machine. We have a new bread machine and my husband can't find the recipe he used to bake dark bread in our old one.

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While you guys are at it, I'd love to get hold of a tried & true recipe for a really dense, heavy, dark multigrain bread (not plain pumpernickel) baked in a bread machine. We have a new bread machine and my husband can't find the recipe he used to bake dark bread in our old one.

Suzy, when I did a google search for seven-grain bread, I recall seeing at least a couple of bread machine recipes. I didn't get them because I don't use a machine. Let me know if you're unable to find them.

Sidecar Ron

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<center>

<img src="http://www.recipesonrails.com/recipes/photo/76.png">

</center><br><br>

Our family absolutely loves this bread. It's a big recipe, and I use my own shorthand in the instructions, so feel free to pm me if you have any questions....

You can find the recipe <a href="http://www.recipesonrails.com/recipes/show/76">here</a>

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<center>

<img src="http://www.recipesonrails.com/recipes/photo/76.png">

</center><br><br>

Our family absolutely loves this bread.  It's a big recipe, and I use my own shorthand in the instructions, so feel free to pm me if you have any questions....

You can find the recipe <a href="http://www.recipesonrails.com/recipes/show/76">here</a>

Great looking bread! I'm going to try it. Where can I find the biga recipe? Also, I'd probably try using some whole wheat flour. Have you tried that?

Thanks much!

Sidecar Ron


Edited by RonC (log)

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Great looking bread! I'm going to try it. Where can I find the biga recipe? Also, I'd probably try using some whole wheat flour. Have you tried that?

Thanks much!

Sidecar Ron

Ooops, sorry about that. We upgraded the site, but I forgot to modify the recipe. At the very bottom of the page, you should find a link now to both the biga recipe and the multi-grain mix recipe. Click on the downward arrow (or V) and the recipe will expand out. Or, alternatively, you can use the search in the upper right corner....

I almost always add the cracked wheat, but never substituted in some whole wheat. I didin't think it needed it. I know some people want to cut back on white flour, but I'd strongly suggest you try it out without substitution first, and then change away to meet your own family's tastes. This one is really a keeper..... Please post a comment at www.recipesonrails.com to let me know what you thought of it...

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The VERY BEST recipe I know of is from Cooks Illustrated. It is their Multi-grain Bread that came out a few issues ago. They use seven-grain hot cereal (Like Bobs Red Mill), Graham flour, sunflower seeds.

It is fantastic. It is light and delicious. (Yes, a light multigrain bread recipe.) There is a really long thread on CIs forum discussing this recipe.

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The VERY BEST recipe I know of is from Cooks Illustrated. It is their Multi-grain Bread that came out a few issues ago. They use seven-grain hot cereal (Like Bobs Red Mill), Graham flour, sunflower seeds.

It is fantastic. It is light and delicious. (Yes, a light multigrain bread recipe.) There is a really long thread on CIs forum discussing this recipe.

Thanks Becca. I'll check this out too. We save all our back issues of CI.

Sidecar Ron

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Hey Ron,

Not sure if you're still following this thread, but I adapted my multi-grain loaf over to the no-knead process, and reduced the recipe. Made it today, and it turned out rather well....

<br><center><img src="http://www.recipesonrails.com/recipes/photo/507.png?1151883655"></center><br>

I made rolls tonight, about 5 oz. each. You can check out the recipe, and step by step pictures by clicking HERE.

<br>

Let me know what you think if you try it out.

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The VERY BEST recipe I know of is from Cooks Illustrated. It is their Multi-grain Bread that came out a few issues ago. They use seven-grain hot cereal (Like Bobs Red Mill), Graham flour, sunflower seeds.

It is fantastic. It is light and delicious. (Yes, a light multigrain bread recipe.) There is a really long thread on CIs forum discussing this recipe.

I agree. It was fantastic.

(Pictures in my blog)

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I'll third that recipe from CI, it's our standard sandwich bread now. There's a bowl rising on the counter as I type. I ran out last week and bought some bread and it was awful, spongy and sweet, I barely ate my lunch.

If you can believe it, my local store has 5,6,8,and 10 grain mix. No 7. The bread works great with Bob's Red Mill 10 grain.

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Here's an industrial sized recipe. It can be scaled down. Great bread.

Multi Grain 40 33.5 oz loaves

sponge weights are in lbs.

h20 17.60

honey 8.4

molasses 1.26

fresh yeast 1.26

whole wheat 33.6

sesame seed .83

flax .83

sunflower seed 3.42

nine grain mix 4.15 from Honeyville grains in Utah

1min 1st, 4 min 2nd 80 qt Hobart

3 hr ferment ddt 75 degrees

dough ddt 80 degrees

h20 5.4 65 degrees

yeast .6

salt 1.11

bread flour 8.6

1 min 1st, 2 min 2nd, 4 min 2nd

25 min. rest, proceed right to dividing, scaling, and shaping. Proof at 95 degrees, 85% humidity.

After shaping this bread is sprayed with water and rolled in a mix of flax seeds, sesame seeds and poppy seeds. Slash three times across the top when baking.

Bake at 315 degrees in a rotary rack oven till 190 degrees inside. Let cool thoroughly before slicing. Will last most of the week in a bag on the counter.

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Great looking bread/ I'm gonna try it and will let you know how it turns out --- but you've set the standard pretty high!

Sidecar Ron

Hey Ron,

Not sure if you're still following this thread, but I adapted my multi-grain loaf over to the no-knead process, and reduced the recipe.  Made it today, and it turned out rather well....

<br><center><img src="http://www.recipesonrails.com/recipes/photo/507.png?1151883655"></center><br>

I made rolls tonight, about 5 oz. each.  You can check out the recipe, and step by step pictures by clicking HERE.

<br>

Let me know what you think if you try it out.

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I've made 8 loaves of the CI multigrain and agree that's VERY good! Don't know how I missed it in that issue, so thanks for sending me back to it.

Sidecar Ron

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