Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
Mayhaw Man

Louisiana Cookbooks: favorites (merged)

Recommended Posts

Speaking of junior leauge cookbooks re louisiana, everything i have made from the Roux to Do cookbook that hte JL of Greater Covington put out has always gone over well. It also gets the nod for best cover in my small (but growing) cookbook collection.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have the new book by Tom Fitzmorris now.


It is good to be a BBQ Judge.  And now it is even gooder to be a Steak Cookoff Association Judge.  Life just got even better.  Woo Hoo!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After reading the thread regarding Louisiana cookbooks, favorites and recommendations, I decided to toot my own horn. I appreciate the kind words regarding my cookbook WHO'S YOUR MAMA, ARE YOU CATHOLIC, AND CAN YOU MAKE A ROUX? Unfortunately it went out of print almost three years ago due to a legal problem. But I'm happy to announce that the book is being republished and will be re-released in June by Acadiana House Publishers. It has been redesigned but will include all the original recipes, photographs and narratives. The book will be available at most bookstores and through this website http://www.acadianhouse.com/acadianhousepu...ingonlinestore/

Book signings in New Orleans, New Iberia, Houma, and Lafayette, as well as in Shreveport, and perhaps Pensacola are being scheduled for this summer.

I hope to see some of you then! And thanks again.

Marcelle Bienvenu

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love most of the books mentioned, but I thought I'd add a few of my favorites not yet mentioned:

--Pirate's Pantry: good SW LA cooking, produced by a community group in Lake Charles, with nice instructions & illustrations on picking crabs, opening oysters, peeling shrimp, cooking wild game, etc. These features make it a great gift for someone unfamiliar with seafood.

--the New Orleans Cookbook by Richard Collin; very good!

--Times-Picayune's Creole Cookbook (various editions)

Of the already mentioned cookbooks, I also love Leon Soniat's La Bouche Creole, Lafcadio Hearn's Creole Cook (more for historic interest rather than cooking), the Real & Rustic Emeril/Bienvenu's book, and Bienvenu's Who's Your Mama.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I love most of the books mentioned, but I thought I'd add a few of my favorites not yet mentioned:

--Pirate's Pantry:  good SW LA cooking, produced by a community group in Lake Charles, with nice instructions & illustrations on picking crabs, opening oysters, peeling shrimp, cooking wild game, etc.  These features make it a great gift for someone unfamiliar with seafood.

--the New Orleans Cookbook by Richard Collin; very good!

--Times-Picayune's Creole Cookbook (various editions)

Of the already mentioned cookbooks, I also love Leon Soniat's La Bouche Creole, Lafcadio Hearn's Creole Cook (more for historic interest rather than cooking), the Real & Rustic Emeril/Bienvenu's book, and Bienvenu's  Who's Your Mama.

Pirates Pantry is the local Junior League cookbook.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some favorites from my ever growing collection are:

The Picayune's Creole Cookbook - One of my absolute favorite's, edited by Marcelle Bienvenu. I love historical recipes, and old methods that remind us how spoiled we really are.

American Cooking: Creole and Acadian (time-life) out of print, but fairly easy to find, wonderful reading for Louisiana food lovers. (Marcelle Bienvenu had a hand in this one too.)

The New Orleans Cookbook by Richard & Rima Collin

From Woodstoves to Microwaves: Cooking with Entergy **available only through United Way here:

http://www.unitedwaynola.org/be_a_leader/cookbook.htm

Creole Feast by Nathaniel Burton & Rudy Lombard

Both Commander's Palace Cookbooks - the 1984 by Ella & Dick Brennan and the 2000 by the late Jamie Shannon and Ti Adelaide Martin

Creole Gumbo & All that Jazz by Howard Mitcham

Louisiana Real & Rustic by Emeril Lagasse & Marcelle Bienvenu (once again, she's so wonderful :-) ) This one really turned me on to this cuisine that I love so much and made me want to dig deeper.

The Evolution Of Creole & Cajun Cuisine by John Folse

Chef Paul Prudhomme's Louisiana Kitchen

Danno

http://www.nolacuisine.com


Edited by Danno (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great news! If I may, I want to recommend two places to refresh yourself while in Houma. 1921 for crawfish, oysters, shrimp and crab. Christiano's for Italian(localized), the young chef there ,Michael Chancey, is doing great work there, and Christiano, besides being the consumate host, can better advise you on who'll have the best oysters and such at that time.

Tim Haws, Chef

previously of New Orleans and Houma

and now lost in New England

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The old Time-Life series, Creole and Acadian volume is interesting, has some recipes I've not seen anywhere else, and really cool old pics of some of the giants of New Orleans cuisine. Paul Prudhommes first book is a great one too. I've got a notebook with several menues from the likes of Brennan's, Antoines, Galatoire's, Commanders, dating from the 60's and 70's. averitable greatest hits of New Orleans cooking, and the prices are hysterical.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My favorite cookbook right now is written by Danno and available free on-line at www.nolacuisine.com. Keep up the excellent work Danno. I must say that many of your creations look better online than they do in person at the venerable establishments that serve them. I am thinking Chicken Pontalba this weekend. Charlie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks so much for the kind words Sauturn bar, that put a huge smile on my face. This site is nothing but fun for me, and it makes me extremely happy to hear that someone finds it enjoyable also! Be sure and give me details on your Pontalba, one of my absolute favorites.

Danno

http://www.nolacuisine.com

My favorite cookbook right now is written by Danno and available free on-line at www.nolacuisine.com.  Keep up the excellent work Danno.  I must say that many of your creations look better online than they do in person at the venerable establishments that serve them.  I am thinking Chicken Pontalba this weekend.  Charlie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My favorite of the ones I have is Creole Gumbo and All That Jazz by Howard Mitcham. It's silly, irreverent, full of character and a real education in Louisiana seafood and jazz music. I just adore this book.

My second favorite looks cheesey from the outside but is excellent: The New Cajun-Creole Cooking by Terry Thompson (now Terry Thompson -Anderson).

Don't have any Prudhomme ones yet but will keep a lookout. Has anyone read Susan Spicer's Crescent City?


Jennifer Brizzi

Author of "Ravenous," a food column for Ulster Publishing (Woodstock Times, Kingston Times, Dutchess Beat etc.) and the food blog "Tripe Soup"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks so much for the kind words Sauturn bar, that put a huge smile on my face. This site is nothing but fun for me, and it makes me extremely happy to hear that someone finds it enjoyable also! Be sure and give me details on your Pontalba, one of my absolute favorites.

Danno

http://www.nolacuisine.com

My favorite cookbook right now is written by Danno and available free on-line at www.nolacuisine.com.  Keep up the excellent work Danno.  I must say that many of your creations look better online than they do in person at the venerable establishments that serve them.  I am thinking Chicken Pontalba this weekend.  Charlie

Hey, I love your site! I made your recipe for Shrimp Remoulade for a Thanksgiving fête last year and WOW it was certainly a big hit; folks loved it!

Next up: that Shrimp Creole is sure lookin' good! :biggrin:


John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have both official Commander Palace cookbooks (the one by Dick and Ella Brennan in 1984, and the other one by Ella Brennan's daughter Ti Adelaide Martin and the late Jamie Shannon in 2000). The 2000 edition probably is more comprehensive and teaches you how to create spice mixtures like seasoning mixes or crab boil from scratch. I found it very handy for someone overseas like yours truly. Recipes wise, the 1984 cookbook was trying a little too hard to be relevant to contemporary food trends - the gumbos are thinner as roux is left out. The 2000 cookbook is somewhat more sensible.

But I feel a little disappointed that many of the traditional Creole restaurant dishes, even as famous as oyster Rockefeller and crawfish etouffee, are absent because the newer restaurant dishes have occupied their places.

I would recommend another NO restaurant cookbook, preferably one of the grand dame establishments, to complement the two Commander Palace books as good as they are. I found Kit Wohl's Arnaud's Restaurant Cookbook a good title to complement the two discussed so far. It has the old time favourites that are left out of the Commander Palace cookbooks.

It must be seconded recommendations by others the best most comprehensive of all is John Folse's The Encyclopedia of Cajun and Creole Cuisine. It is not exhausive but has very broad range of dishes. I don't like the graphics though - as a reviewer on amazon.com has commented, their quality are more akin to the 1980s than one made in 2004.

About Susan Spicer, I think she is more New American but happens to be based in New Orleans. Recipes like seared duck breasts with pepper jelly glaze or seared yellowfish tuna with walnut red pepper sauce would be just as likely to have come from Napa Valley as Louisiana. It is still a good title though and I would say it is a must if you want to build a library of good food from New Orleans and Louisiana in general.

I do plan on getting Emerile Lagasse's specific Louisiana books, Paul Prudhomme's classic and Terry Thompson-Anderson sometime in the future.

Does anyone have Roy Guste's Antoine's cookbook? Is that a good read?

And how about Tom Fitzmorris's New Orleans Food?

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's a couple new good un's I've run across. I'm very fond of the Cooking Up A Storm book released by Judy Walker and Marcelle Bienvenu of the Picayune. I'm fairly new to real New Orleans cooking and have been getting good mileage out of the recipes here. They're compiled from recipes people wrote to the paper looking for after the storm, and it's an interesting mix of seriously old school stuff (Daube a' glace) , new specialties, and recipes from now defunct New Orleans restaurants and bakeries. I make the Creole Okra with shrimp on a very regular basis now. It's definitely worth a look.

I'm also loving the Crescent City Farmer's Market Cookbook, mainly because it brings together fresh market ingredients and New Orleans cooking in a really nice, approachable way. Haven't been able to cook much from it since I'm away at school, but I intend to get into it in a big way when I come home to California. The barbequed shrimp pie, sauteed sheepshead with tomato Sauternes butter sauce and the gumbo z'herbes perked my ears up. Nice profiles of the people who run the market and sell their produce there as well.

Has anyone picked up Donald Link's Real Cajun yet? Dying to get my hands on that.


Edited by faine (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Has anyone picked up Donald Link's Real Cajun yet? Dying to get my hands on that.

I have it. Right now I'm a little disappointed but that has more to do with my expectations than anything else. I bought it sight unseen thinking it was going to be mostly old-fashioned, rustic recipes. There are a few recipes like that but most are fancier than I expected. For example, he calls for poblano and jalapeno peppers in his etouffee and gumbo recipes. His seafood gumbo recipes calls for 3 cups of oil and 4 cups of flour, which sounds weird to me. There's no recipe for crawfish bisque. Duck gumbo and rabbit gumbo are mentioned but no recipes are provided. Come to think of it, I don't think the book contains a recipe for duck or rabbit. I was also hoping for more seafood recipes. Every recipe might be excellent, but the book is certainly not what I expected based on the title and the press.


Edited by Harry (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Harry, sounds like you are a definite candidate for Folse's Encyclopedia of Cajun and Creole Cuisine. ch

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Has anyone picked up Donald Link's Real Cajun yet? Dying to get my hands on that.

I have it. Right now I'm a little disappointed but that has more to do with my expectations than anything else. I bought it sight unseen thinking it was going to be mostly old-fashioned, rustic recipes. There are a few recipes like that but most are fancier than I expected. For example, he calls for poblano and jalapeno peppers in his etouffee and gumbo recipes. His seafood gumbo recipes calls for 3 cups of oil and 4 cups of flour, which sounds weird to me. There's no recipe for crawfish bisque. Duck gumbo and rabbit gumbo are mentioned but no recipes are provided. Come to think of it, I don't think the book contains a recipe for duck or rabbit. I was also hoping for more seafood recipes. Every recipe might be excellent, but the book is certainly not what I expected based on the title and the press.

I definitely expected something a little different, but it seems like a good book. I haven't had a chance to make anything from it yet, but I expect to get a lot of use out of it this summer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Harry, sounds like you are a definite candidate for Folse's Encyclopedia of Cajun and Creole Cuisine.  ch

Somebody gave that to me and I have to say it doesn't do much for me. Too much filler and the recipes seem a little too calculated to appeal to the masses or keep up with the times.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Harry, sounds like you are a definite candidate for Folse's Encyclopedia of Cajun and Creole Cuisine.  ch

Another one to consider is Talk About Good from the Lafayette Jr League. I use that for reference a lot. The recipes are very authentic.


It is good to be a BBQ Judge.  And now it is even gooder to be a Steak Cookoff Association Judge.  Life just got even better.  Woo Hoo!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Talk About Good recipe for cheesecake is a mainstay at our house around the holidays. Is it still in print? ch

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Harry, sounds like you are a definite candidate for Folse's Encyclopedia of Cajun and Creole Cuisine.  ch

Another one to consider is Talk About Good from the Lafayette Jr League. I use that for reference a lot. The recipes are very authentic.

I really like those Junior League-type cookbooks. Especially fun to see who's on the cookbook committee, and then look for their recipes.

Particularly good.


I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Talk About Good recipe for cheesecake is a mainstay at our house around the holidays.  Is it still in print?  ch

I picked up my copy at Hebert's Specialty Meats here in Tulsa. (they are of the Turducken fame). Give Ed Richard a call, if he has one in stock he will probably send it to you.


It is good to be a BBQ Judge.  And now it is even gooder to be a Steak Cookoff Association Judge.  Life just got even better.  Woo Hoo!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Talk About Good recipe for cheesecake is a mainstay at our house around the holidays.  Is it still in print?  ch

I picked up my copy at Hebert's Specialty Meats here in Tulsa. (they are of the Turducken fame). Give Ed Richard a call, if he has one in stock he will probably send it to you.

Still in print. Along with 'Talk About Good II.' Great book. Several people have mentioned it in this thread.

You can order here: 'Talk About Good' - Amazon


I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't worry, I have copies of both. I just figured that they had gone out of print a long time ago. But I see now that Talk About Good I is on its 23rd printng, rather incredible really. ch

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
But I see now that Talk About Good I is on its 23rd printng, rather incredible really.  ch

'River Roads' is in its 70th. Whomever it was that initially said "I know, let's put out a cookbook!" deserves a spot in the fundraising hall of fame.


I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By Burmese Days
      Hello everyone,
       
      This is my first post, so please tell me if I've made any mistakes. I'd like to learn the ropes as soon as possible. 
       
      I first learned of this cookbook from The Mala Market, easily the best online source of high-quality Chinese ingredients in the west. In the About Us page, Taylor Holiday (the founder of Mala Market) talks about the cookbooks that inspired her.
      This piqued my interest and sent me down a long rabbit hole. I'm attempting to categorically share everything I've found about this book so far.
       
      Reading it online
      Early in my search, I found an online preview (Adobe Flash required). It shows you the first 29 pages. I've found people reference an online version you can pay for on the Chinese side of the internet. But to my skills, it's been unattainable.
       
      The Title
      Because this book was never sold in the west, the cover, and thus title, were never translated to English. Because of this, when you search for this book, it'll have several different names. These are just some versions I've found online - typos included.
      Sichuan (China) Cuisine in Both Chinese and English Si Chuan(China) Cuisinein (In English & Chinese) China Sichuan Cuisine (in Chinese and English) Chengdu China: Si Chuan Ke Xue Ji Shu Chu Ban She Si Chuan(China) Cuisinein (Chinese and English bilingual) 中国川菜:中英文标准对照版 For the sake of convenience, I'll be referring to the cookbook as Sichuan Cuisine from now on.

       
      Versions
      There are two versions of Sichuan Cuisine. The first came out in 2010 and the second in 2014. In an interview from Flavor & Fortune, a (now defunct) Chinese cooking
      magazine, the author clarifies the differences.
      That is all of the information I could find on the differences. Nothing besides that offhanded remark. The 2014 edition seems to be harder to source and, when available, more expensive.
       
      Author(s)

      In the last section, I mentioned an interview with the author. That was somewhat incorrect. There are two authors!
      Lu Yi (卢一) President of Sichuan Tourism College, Vice Chairman of Sichuan Nutrition Society, Chairman of Sichuan Food Fermentation Society, Chairman of Sichuan Leisure Sports Management Society Du Li (杜莉) Master of Arts, Professor of Sichuan Institute of Tourism, Director of Sichuan Cultural Development Research Center, Sichuan Humanities and Social Sciences Key Research Base, Sichuan Provincial Department of Education, and member of the International Food Culture Research Association of the World Chinese Culinary Federation Along with the principal authors, two famous chefs checked the English translations.
      Fuchsia Dunlop - of Land of Plenty fame Professor Shirley Cheng - of Hyde Park New York's Culinary Institute of America Fuchsia Dunlop was actually the first (and to my knowledge, only) Western graduate from the school that produced the book.
       

      Recipes
      Here are screenshots of the table of contents.  It has some recipes I'm a big fan of.
       
      ISBN
      ISBN 10: 7536469640   ISBN 13: 9787536469648 As far as I can tell, the first and second edition have the same ISBN #'s. I'm no librarian, so if anyone knows more about how ISBN #'s relate to re-releases and editions, feel free to chime in.
       
      Publisher
      Sichuan Science and Technology Press 四川科学技术出版社  
      Cover
      Okay... so this book has a lot of covers.
      The common cover A red cover A white cover A white version of the common cover An ornate and shiny cover  There may or may not be a "Box set." At first, I thought this was a difference in book editions, but that doesn't seem to be the case. As far as covers go, I'm at a loss. If anybody has more info, I'm all ears.
       
      Buying the book
      Alright, so I've hunted down many sites that used to sell it and a few who still have it in stock. Most of them are priced exorbitantly.
       
      AbeBooks.com ($160 + $15 shipping) Ebay.com - used ($140 + $4 shipping) PurpleCulture.net ($50 + $22 shipping) Amazon.com ($300 + $5 shipping + $19 tax) A few other sites in Chinese  
      I bought a copy off of PurpleCuture.net on April 14th. When I purchased Sichuan Cuisine, it said there was only one copy left. That seems to be a lie to create false urgency for the buyer. My order never updated past processing, but after emailing them, I was given a tracking code. It has since landed in America and is in customs. I'll try to update this thread when (if) it is delivered.
       
      Closing thoughts
      This book is probably not worth all the effort that I've put into finding it. But what is worth effort, is preserving knowledge. It turns my gut to think that this book will never be accessible to chefs that have a passion for learning real Sichuan food. As we get inundated with awful recipes from Simple and quick blogs, it becomes vital to keep these authentic sources available. As the internet chugs along, more and more recipes like these will be lost. 
       
      You'd expect the internet to keep information alive, but in many ways, it does the opposite. In societies search for quick and easy recipes, a type of evolutionary pressure is forming. It's a pressure that mutates recipes to simpler and simpler versions of themselves. They warp and change under consumer pressure till they're a bastardized copy of the original that anyone can cook in 15 minutes. The worse part is that these new, worse recipes wear the same name as the original recipe. Before long, it becomes harder to find the original recipe than the new one. 
       
      In this sense, the internet hides information. 
       
    • By TexasMBA02
      After batting about .500 with my previous approach to macarons, I came across Pierre Herme's base recipe online.  After two flawless batches of macarons, I've been re-energized to continue to work at mastering them.  Specifically, I want to try more of his recipes.  My conundrum is that he has, as far as I can tell, two macaron cookbooks and I don't know which one I should get.  I can't tell if one is just an updated version of the other or a reissue or what the differences really are.  I was hoping somebody had some insight.  I have searched online and haven't seen both books referenced in the same context or contrasted at all.
       
      This one appears to be older.

       
      And this one appears to be the newer of the two.

       
      Any insight would be helpful.
       
      Thanks,
       
    • By K8CanCook
      Update!! --- the sale is still going on at Amazon as of Sunday (11/24) at 11:15am EST
      ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
       
      Did anyone note the sale price on Modernist Cuisine today (maybe yesterday)? Amazon and Target dropped the set of tomes to $379!!!
       
      This price looks like it will change after today...so get it ASAP!!!

      https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/0982761007?pf_rd_p=183f5289-9dc0-416f-942e-e8f213ef368b&pf_rd_r=SRFCHFB5EFTGAA8AZHJX
      -or-
      https://www.target.com/p/modernist-cuisine-by-nathan-myhrvold-chris-young-maxime-bilet-hardcover/-/A-77279948
    • By Bollo
      I need a book on the application of rotavapor machine. I've searched something on web but i can't find something strictly professional for the kitchen please help me. To improve the research. 
    • By Smokeydoke
      After a delightful brunch at Koslow's Sqirl restaurant in Los Angeles, I've decided to attempt to cook through her cookbook. I'll post my results here.
       
      Please follow along and join in, if you're so inclined. Her food is wonderful, but I will surmise that her true deliciousness comes from using the best and freshest ingredients. I'll do my best to recreate the magic I felt at Sqirl.
       
      Here's the link to her book at Eat Your Books.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...