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firedogut

17.11 pound ribeye roast...help!

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i have a 17 pound 7 rib ribeye roast.

i was thinking about seasoning it with salt and fresh pepper and maybe some rosemarry. the question i have is how long to cook it at .

i was thinking cooking in a 250F oven. should i cover it? how long per lb?

i want a med-rare to med doneness.

thanks

also i need side dishes

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a) Get a meat thermometer, preferably digital

b) Cook at 145F until the inside is at 140F for med-rare, or even better 132F for rare-med. About 6 hours.

c) Be amazed

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Dry age it first for a week then shave off the dried out layer.

Then I'd cook to 120 internal and the temp will easily go up to 130. This is perfect med. rare in opinion. Finish it with a blast under the broiler to get a slight crust and some Maillard action.

250 seems a little low to me but if its that big perhaps you want to cook it that low. I would tend to say 325-50ish.

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jack and I always disagree on how to cook a roast. :biggrin: I do mine at 300 convection. Brush with olive oil, season with kosher salt and pepper. Cook to 122 for rare, 125 for med rare , 130 for med. I use the ratio of 22 minutes per lb.

Using convection if you have it will give you a nice crust regardless, but at 17 lbs, even a regular oven at 325 will do the same thing.

At 22 minutes per lb figure six hours for med rare. and go up from there.

Do not cover it.

use drippings for yorkshire pudding.

See here for finished 4 bone rib roast.


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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i have a 17 pound 7 rib ribeye roast.

i was  thinking about seasoning it with salt and fresh pepper and maybe some rosemarry.  the question i have is how long to cook it at .

i was thinking cooking in a 250F oven.  should i cover it? how long per lb?

i want a med-rare to med doneness.

thanks

also i need side dishes

I cooked a 7-bone, 20#, USDA Prime, standing rib roast for Christmas. Here's how we did it.

Cut it into 2 roasts, a 3-bone and a 4-bone. We knew about half the guests preferred their meat medium to well, we figured two roasts would give us enough latitude to satisfay everyone's doneness preferences. We made a seasoning paste with butter, salt, pepper, garlic and some other spices I can't remember and smeared it over both roasts. 425* oven for 30 mintues, then down to about 300* for the remaining time. Remove when meat thermometer hits 120* internal temp. Residual cooking will finish it. Let stand minimum of 20 minutes before cutting.

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Julia Child's method never fails.

For a seven-rib, 17-pound roast, smear the cut ends with butter, season with salt and pepper, and roast in a preheated 325ºF (170ºC) oven for 3¼ to 4 hours, until the meat's internal temperature is 125ºF (52ºC) for medium rare. Every half hour, baste the cut ends with the fat that accumulates in the pan. About an hour before the end of the cooking, strew some chopped onions and carrots around the roast.

You should start checking the temperature at or slightly before the 3-hour point; when it reaches 105ºF (41ºC), check it every 5 minutes.

As soon as the desired temperature is reached, remove the roast from the oven, leaving the door ajar. Allow the meat to rest for 10 or 15 minutes while the oven cools, then return it to the oven, close the oven door and leave it, for up to an hour. Check the temperature every 15 minutes; 100ºF (38ºC) is fine for serving.

While the roast rests, make the jus. Remove the fat from the roasting pan. Add 2 or 3 cups beef stock and use a wooden spoon to scrape up any brown bits stuck to the bottom. Bring to a simmer, mashing the vegetables into the broth. If you want to add rosemary, now's the time to do it. Skim off any fat. Season with salt and pepper. Just before serving, strain the jus into a warmed sauce boat, adding any juices from the resting roast.


Edited by carswell (log)

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jack and I always disagree on how to cook a roast. :biggrin: 

See here for finished 4 bone rib roast.

That sounds like a challenge!

I was planning on Beef for Sunday, anyway. Probably not 17lbs, as there will be only 4 of us..

However the time doesn't go up that much, since its coverned by the thickness, not the length...

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Jack, I'll see your roasting temp and raise you 150 degrees. :biggrin: Although I'm supposed to be smoking butt on Sunday. Pick a day and we'll have a roast off. :biggrin:


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Allow the meat to rest for 10 or 15 minutes

I say rest for 30 minutes, minimum.

You're quoting out of context. Child suggests resting the roast, untented, on the countertop for 10 to 15 minutes and then transfering it to the cooled oven, where it rests for up to another hour.

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My choice of seasoning - salt, pepper, and a smear of hot British Mustard. The mustard mellows and makes it taste more beefy. That is all you need.

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I didn't notice--do you have enough time to dry age it? You would really have a fine piece of meat.


Cooking is chemistry, baking is alchemy.

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I usually get one that has had the fat cap cut off and tied back on. I remove the ties and lift the cap and trim excessive fat from the meat.

Then smear with copious amounts of finely minced garlic, kosher salt, and fresh ground pepper. Then put the fat cap back over it and roast at 350º for 3 to 3 1/2 hours. In the restaurant I would pull it at 115º but for home I would go for 130-135º unless you want it well done.

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i have a 17 pound 7 rib ribeye roast.

i was  thinking about seasoning it with salt and fresh pepper and maybe some rosemarry.  the question i have is how long to cook it at .

i was thinking cooking in a 250F oven.  should i cover it? how long per lb?

i want a med-rare to med doneness.

thanks

also i need side dishes

firedogut:

I question if you actually have a 17 pound "Ribeye" 7 rib Roast. Almost all regular commercial boneless ribeyes come in 2 ways. Spencer average 9/12 pounds and denuded average 6 1/2 to 10 pounds.

There is a 3rd type sometimes cut by retail butchers from the whole primal rib that contains the deckle or rib flap meat with some additional fat cover that may weigh as much as 17 pounds but I haven't seen any sold retail since the advent of boxed beef in years.

If the Rib is with the deckle it will require a lower temperature to remove the collagen on the topside of the Rib where the Flap or deckle is located as this cut is tougher then the eye of the rib.

If your rib roast has the 7 bones it very likely that is has the deckle removed with the fat trimmed and placed on top of the exterior.

Whatever way you decide to roast the Rib it simplest to simply place it in a Pyrex or deep roasting pan with a grid on top or placed high enough from the bottom of your pan to cover the bottom with at least a 1 to 1 1/2 inch cover of water to keep everything moist during roasting and to catch the fats and drippings.

You can start under the broil in your over for about 8/10 minutes each side (top and bottom) just long enough to sear. I prefer not to salt since it brings some of the juices to the surface, but pepper and yes some English dry mustard paste cover does enhance the beef flavor, it a excellent professional enhancement.

The rib may then be roasted at 200/225 degrees until it reaches a internal temperature of 140 degrees for medium rare and 145 degrees for medium, then removed from your oven again on a elevated grid and permitted to set for 20/30 minutes away from any heat. Since it was roasted at a low temperature the heat rises less during the setting time then if it was roasted at a higher temperature.

I generally drain off the water from the bottom of the over pan and bring it to a boil skimming off the fat mixing the remaining liquid with the juices from the resting roast together with a splash of wine to use if anyone wants to have the meat done more then medium. Cooked this way the meat roasts very evenly thru out.

Irwin


I don't say that I do. But don't let it get around that I don't.

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I question if you actually have a 17 pound "Ribeye" 7 rib Roast. Almost all regular commercial boneless ribeyes come in 2 ways. Spencer average 9/12 pounds and denuded average 6 1/2 to 10 pounds.

There is a 3rd type sometimes cut by retail butchers from the whole primal rib that contains the deckle or rib flap meat with some additional fat cover that may weigh as much as 17 pounds but I haven't seen any sold retail since the advent of boxed beef in years.

I have to disagree with you here - boxed beef ribeyes come in a variety of weight ranges, and the two I see most often (and I sell the stuff for a living) are 12 and ups, and 12 and downs. The 12 and downs most often weigh in at 11 to 12lbs - we are seeing far more larger ribeyes these days - the 12 and ups. I put one on the scale the other day and it was 15.65lbs - so 17lbs doesn't seem totally out of line.

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Nothing like a lovely standing rib roast. Makes the house smell like Christmas to me! I like to start at 400 degrees for about 10 minutes, then drop to 325 degrees. I take mine to 120 degrees for a nice medium rare; once out, covered in foil, I let it rest for about 1/2 hour while I use the drippings to make some nice Yorkshire puddings. Sides? along with the Yorkies, how about gratin of cloved onion. Goes great with it.

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Love the onion gratin idea. A certifiably great paring with beef.

Staying in the same family, leeks braised with butter and finished with Parmesan are another beef-friendly side.

And let's not forget the classic: mashed potatoes. For a treat, flavour them with garlic or horseradish. Or skip the leeks and put the Parmesan in the spuds.


Edited by carswell (log)

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I question if you actually have a 17 pound "Ribeye" 7 rib Roast. Almost all regular commercial boneless ribeyes come in 2 ways. Spencer average 9/12 pounds and denuded average 6 1/2 to 10 pounds.

There is a 3rd type sometimes cut by retail butchers from the whole primal rib that contains the deckle or rib flap meat with some additional fat cover that may weigh as much as 17 pounds but I haven't seen any sold retail since the advent of boxed beef in years.

I have to disagree with you here - boxed beef ribeyes come in a variety of weight ranges, and the two I see most often (and I sell the stuff for a living) are 12 and ups, and 12 and downs. The 12 and downs most often weigh in at 11 to 12lbs - we are seeing far more larger ribeyes these days - the 12 and ups. I put one on the scale the other day and it was 15.65lbs - so 17lbs doesn't seem totally out of line.

Juanito & BryanZ:

Juanito:

Regarding the weights of Boxed Beef "Ribeye's" they are regularly packed under official USDA designation numbers:

USDA # 112 Ribeye

Range A 500/600 pound carcass = average weight 6 pounds

Range C 700/800 pound carcass = average weight 10/11 pounds

USDA # 112A Ribeye Lip-on

Range A & C carcass weights = 1 pound additional each piece

There is another cut of Boneless rib, not considered the ribeye rarely ordered retail as it's not a good yield with the extra fat and longer tail remaining that can be in that weight range.

USDA # 108, UDSA # 109C and USDA # 109D are all the specialty cuts that may weigh over 17 pounds.

BryanZ:

The reason for cooking a whole ribeye to 140 degrees for medium rare and 145 degrees for medium is that beef cooked at lower temperature while resting elevated in air does not increase it's temperature except superficially during this time frame.

Beef roasted at higher temperatures when setting at rest may continue to cook enough to increase the internal temperature in excess of 10% after removing from the heat. That why slow/low temperature roasted beef appears to be evenly cooked, while higher temperature roasts are pinker in the center. Roasting the beef over a water base also melts away more fats and keeps the beef juicer.

120 degrees after rest = 132 degrees + at this temperature during rest juices often flow from the beef.

When the beef rests at 140 degrees low temperature cooking the juices generally remain until the beef is sliced giving a livelier appearance and beefier flavor and character.

Irwin


I don't say that I do. But don't let it get around that I don't.

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As promised upthread it is beef for lunch this Sunday:

First visit the excellent local butcher and obtain a piece of rib. They have local specialist breeds from time to time. This is a 3 bone roast, about 5lbs, since there are only four of us for lunch (and some for leftover). Goes on about 7am for a 1pm lunch.

gallery_7620_135_5809.jpggallery_7620_135_9865.jpggallery_7620_135_2310.jpggallery_7620_135_0.jpg

Add a thermometer, and put it in the lowest oven of the mighty AGA. The oven was originally intended as a plate warming oven, but it sits about 140F/60C. For those who don't know, the AGA is a stored heat range. It has a small fire (this one is converted to burn oil), and a lot of mass and insulation. It is on constantly, with 4 ovens that are at different temperatures, roughly 450F, 300F, 200F and 140F. However the temperature will vary a little as food cools the oven which then slowly recovers. Its a dry heat.

gallery_7620_135_4198.jpggallery_7620_135_540.jpg

gallery_7620_135_8809.jpggallery_7620_135_7200.jpg

The thermometer is a Maverick Redicheck Smoker themometer witha remote reading wireless display. I find it very good, except the distance over which the wireless works is rather limited.

3 hours later, about half way:

gallery_7620_135_1977.jpggallery_7620_135_9909.jpg

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6 hours later, and 10 mins in a hot oven to brown the outside. Note the lack of juice before cutting. Rare, even to the edges and tender because of the long cooking:

gallery_7620_135_3634.jpggallery_7620_135_2852.jpg

Yorkshires, sliced and plated

gallery_7620_135_9939.jpggallery_7620_135_13570.jpg

gallery_7620_135_4395.jpg

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