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Ling

wine courses in Vancouver

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I'm interested in taking a beginner-level wine course for fun, and so far I only know of two: one at Dubrulle (Level 1: An Introduction to wine and wine service) and the International Sommelier Guild (ISG) program (Wine Fundamentals, Level 1).

The one at Dubrulle, judging from the description, is more geared towards people who are seeking a job in a restaurant, but I could be wrong.

Does anyone know how much these programs cost, approximately? I've left messages and sent emails but I haven't received a reply yet.

Are there other, more basic, wine courses I should be considering?

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i think that mark davidson is still teaching wine courses out of northwest culinary. he used to be with dubrulle but brought his class to northwest.

another good way is to join wine clubs. we are members in the vancouver american wine society and they have tastings every couple of months, and wine dinners as well. i just joined this past spring and have learnt quite a bit by just going to the tastings.

http://www.vaws.org/


Edited by makanmakan (log)

Quentina

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Lo and behold, Lorna (click): UBC Continuing Studies offers a variety of courses in conjunction with the UBC Wine Research Centre.

I was thinking of taking some of these courses myself. Wonder if anyone else is interested?


Edited by Mooshmouse (log)

Joie Alvaro Kent

"I like rice. Rice is great if you're hungry and want 2,000 of something." ~ Mitch Hedberg

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Hey Ling again,

Some wine shops around town do tasting classes, which I'm sure would be a good starting point (something that I need too BTW). I have heard that Liberty does one, and a quick Google lead to this link. The course linked says it is "basic training for professionals" whatever that means, and it is $200 which is a bit steep for a non-professional enthusiast. Perhaps someone like Lancelot can chime in here with a promotion - of self or otherwise.

Santé!

ETA: Another simulpost with Moosh. Looks like someone had brulee for breakfast...


Edited by BCinBC (log)

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I too am interested in some local courses and would be interested in hearing about the experiences of anyone who has taken them, especially the ISG and the WSET programs.

Here's a link to South World Wine Society's "links" page and if you scroll down, you will come across quite a few urls for educational opportunities.


Edited by appreciator (log)

sarah

Always take a good look at what you're about to eat. It's not so important to know what it is, but it's critical to know what it was. --Unknown

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For a well-rounded, basic knowledge I heartily recommend the WSET course at the NWCA with Mark Davidson. He's taught half the city about wine...

k.

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Ahhhh... I thought he was still doing both as has been the case in past years.

My bad.

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^Maybe he is doing both? I have no idea...there is just info about the ISG program on that page though.

Would you recommend the WSET program over the ISG program?

For the casual fan? Yup. ISG is a LOT more studying and coin...

k

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I took the WSET classes a few years ago. They were called the Intermediate and Higher Level at that time I think, taught by Mark Davidson at Dubrulle. As Kurtis says, Mark taught a lot of people in Vancouver about wine.

The WSET classes are suitable for anyone. In my classes there were a good mix of industry people - servers, a food writer, winery workers, people in sales and distribution, etc - and civilians like me. What I like about WSET is that it is an internationally recognized program, and I figure if you are going to get educated you might as well go through a program that is recognized.

It looks as though Mark does not teach the WSET courses anymore, but they are offered through UBC at UBC Robson Square (check Moosemouse's link above).

I hear the International Sommelier Guild courses are good as well (lots of overlap with WSET), but I haven't taken one of those.


Cheers,

Anne

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I've taken both the WSET and ISG and they are similar at that level. Mark is a great teacher and alot of fun. As far as I know Ian Phillips is teaching the WSET at Dubrelle. He is also a great teacher. You would learn enough and have a great time in either program so decide which one fits your schedule and budget best. I think they are both around $4-500. They are geared towards professionals, but at that level you are really just covering the basics and there would be nothing that you would feel left out on.

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Ling

The WSET Courses would be my choice as well.

For basic info you might want to start with The Windows on The World Wine Course. It is a hardcover book by Kevin Zraly. Very informative.Each section is well thought out informative and not Wine for Dummies.

Just trying a lot of wines and taking note of favorites can be very helpfull.Our more formal tastings are not as focussed on instruction as they are stand up tastings. There really isn't a substitute for sitting down and writing good notes though.

At Marquis Wine Cellars we open two bottles of new/interesting wines to taste every Friday. Anyone is welcome to come by and try them.

I am always happy to answer any questions about wine and if I don't know I'll find out.

David Lancelot

PS We could always trade baking tips for wine tips..


If it's slower than me.

Dumber than me.

And tastes good.

Pass the salt.

Anthony Bourdain

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Would you recommend the WSET program over the ISG program?

I would too. The ISG program is geared toward training professional wine waiters, and focuses on a lot of service-related information you might not be interested in. From what you've said, it sounds like the introductory level of the WSET would be a good fit. The names for the different levels can be confusing; take a look at the

list of programs on the WSET site. Just to make it more confusing, I've heard that those levels are going to be re-worked soon...

Of course, the absolute best way to learn about wine is to taste it, constantly. In addition to taking some organized classes, do lots of informal study on your own.

Check out some tastings at wine stores Marquis Wine Cellars on Davie has some great ones, which are reasonably priced.

Have some friends over for wine tasting nights. Everyone brings a bottle, do a different region or theme each week like 'sauvignon blanc,' or 'Rhone varietals'. Read up just a little bit beforehand in something like Auntie Jancis.

That way, wine becomes not just a component of your learning, but a part of your life.

Edit: Lancelot beat me to the Marquis tasting comment--he's right, it can be hard to take notes. Bring a date and write on their back! I still think their tastings are a great way to learn.


Edited by chrisstearns (log)

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For basic info you might want to start with The Windows on The World Wine Course. It is a hardcover book by Kevin Zraly. Very informative.Each section is well thought out informative and not Wine for Dummies.

David, thanks for the recommendation--I'll pick up this book this afternoon. When are the more formal tastings held (and do I need to purchase a ticket for these tastings?) Will there be someone talking about the wines that are opened on Fridays and Saturdays?

Thanks, Chris, for your recommendation on the Janis Robinson book. I've read it already, and I thought it was excellent for a beginner like me! the wine-tasting night is a great idea...unfortunately, I only have one friend who's interested in learning about wine right now, but he just started his wine cellar and he might take a wine course with me. :smile: I'll try calling Dubrulle today (again) about when the next WSET program starts.

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I just got an email for the Level 1 WSET syllabus offered at Dubrulle.

Here's the basic info:

-class starts on January 3rd (which is a Tuesday, but all subsequent classes will be held on Mondays)

-5 classes, 15 hours of instruction

-as I posted above, tuition is $560, which includes your Tasting kit (6 ISO glasses), and a Study Guide

-evaluation includes a 30 Multiple Choice test, a food and wine pairing exercise, and you must submit a portfolio of tasting notes

Week 1: Intro to Wine

Week 2: Wine Tasting Technique

Week 3: The Art of Wine service

Week 4: Food and Wine matching

Week 5: Review and exam

If you are interested, they will send you an application form through email. Just email Dubrulle for information.

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ok, another wierd coincidence. i got a call from mark davidson today for an appointment and it's been a long time since i've seen him. so, i'm seeing him this friday. i'm going to pick his brain and see if he's going to do an amature series at nwcav. if i remember correctly, he's talked about doing it there before as he used to at dubrulle.


Quentina

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Ling:

For what it's worth I would look into the Liberty Wine courses taught by Tyler Dawson.

He has one of the better palates in the city and has a true passion for wine and passing on his knowledge to those who seek it.

I have done both the ISG level 1&2 and after the fact have been thinking that Tylers way of aproaching wine tasting and understanding to be much more organic and terrior focussed than how others approach the subject.

Not knocking Mark D's teaching methods at all, but Tyler takes a different view to how the subject can be embraced.

Look into it before you lay our money down.

PM me if you want more ............uncensored info.

BTW I do not work for Liberty anymore.

Cheers, Steve


slowfood/slowwine

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Any formal course would be a benefit - I certainly would like to have the time to take one. I agree with both Chris and David. I think that informal bring a bottle tasting events with friends, provided they do not get out of control (as David will appreciate), and wine events are fantastic and a great source to learn and taste things that you may never get a chance to. Also, where else would I have enjoyed stories from Chris telling us about a father who stored Haut Brion in an un-refrigerated shed in Arizona. Which reminds me Chris, when Angela and I are back at Christmas we should set something up with Dave et al.


officially left egullet....

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There is another entity offering the WSET programs in Vancouver.

It is Fine Vintage.

A coworker is currently taking a course and likes it quite a bit.

Ian Phillips at the Art Institute is a great teacher.

He tutored me a bit last year when I was brushing up for my ISG exams.

For people not in the food service industry I would recommend

WSET over the ISG. If you should decide to go further

with the wine education thing and want to switch over

from one to the other, both ISG and WSET recognize

each other's programs so that you wouldn't have to start

all over from the beginning.

In my experience ISG is incredibly disorganized at the head office

and getting mark etc. is a nightmare. They aren't too friendly either.


Bob McLeod

VOX BACCULUS HIC VADIS IN VITRIO JUBILIAM

The road goes on forever and the party never ends

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From the desk of Tyler Dawson at Liberty Wines, Park Royal:

Basic Training

Foundation Wine Tasting Course

Consumers and Trade

$265.00 + tax

Wednesdays Jan 25th, 2006 Thru Feb 15th, 2006

Total Course 12 hours

The Basic Wine Course provides you with the tools to taste and communicate the experience. Your will also learn how wine is made and why it tastes like it does. Sensory-based and experience-rich, this is the essential tasting course for consumers and trade alike.

It is only natural to have Tyler as our lead instructor at the Liberty Wine School. Tyler has an infectious enthusiasm for communicating all things wine and he does so with a deep understanding of the subject. Tyler is also the author of "What's up d'Oc", quick reference/ guide to the Languedoc and Roussillon and "Saké Simple", quick reference/ guide to Saké. He is the founder of the Victoria Wine Academy and director of the Liberty Wine School.


Bob McLeod

VOX BACCULUS HIC VADIS IN VITRIO JUBILIAM

The road goes on forever and the party never ends

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they have one at pacific institute of culinary arts. it's taught by the guy who's also the sommelier at le crocodile


bork bork bork

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I met John Gerum last year and took one of his classes in a private setting. Great information, wonderful tastings and great advice for food pairings. Since then he's been nominated as a finalist for Entrepeneur of the Year... not bad for a somelier turned educator.

I encourage you to take a peak if this fits the bill for the class you are seeking. By the way, check out his monthly wine selection tip, always a good resource:

www.wcwed.com

Brian

www.houseofq.com


Edited by BBQ Brian (log)

Brian Misko

House of Q - Competition BBQ

www.houseofq.com

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