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I have to say that learning to make mayo has been terrific. When we go to our cabin up north, I hate hauling up a whole big jar of mayo, and I'm never sure if we're going to use it (yes, I know I could decant some into a smaller jar), but the kids and I had a lot of fun making it up there. This is a great project with kids.


Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

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Welcome to Maggie's World 'O Mayo...I've made 4 batches since last evening! :biggrin:

When I tasted the chipotle mayo (made in the morning, with EVOO) in the afternoon, it was awful. VERY bitter. I believe someone upthread said beating EVOO to death can result in this. I have definitely confirmed this fact. Into the disposal.

Second attempt - I knew after about 30 seconds of whisking that it was not going to work (gaining experience now :smile: ). It was split or separated, I can't quite remember the term, but someone upthread mentioned the term. Into the disposal.

Third attempt - used Andiesenji's tips - regular oil, lime juice, add the adobo into the oil, etc. The magic happened, and I had chipotle mayo.

About the time I got the margaritas and quesadillas made, in walked two hungry thirsty golfers. They were indeed delighted to see margaritas and quesadillas, and were overwhelmed by the simple deliciousness of the chipotle mayo. They ate all the quesadillas and got some Mexican frozen product out so they could have more mayo! So my three tries were definitely rewarded.

This morning I put together a terrine before work. The recipe called for a topping that featured mayo mixed with some other things, so I of course had to make homemade mayo again. The first try was clearly not going to work...into the disposal. Undaunted, I tried a second batch, and the magic happened. To this I added garlic, parsley, and fresh dill from the back yard. Wow. I can hardly wait for dinner tonight!

Things I have learned so far:

1) If at first you don't succeed, try again for heaven's sake. Eggs are cheap and it's a really quick process. Besides which, isn't that what learning is all about?

2) Likkered up husband is more appreciative of food.

3) Must learn to whisk left handed (doing all this manually is giving right arm and shoulder a bit too much of a workout).

4) Ask Santa for immersion blender (the turbo stick ensemble mentioned above) for Christmas


Edited by MaggieB (log)

Maggie

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Things I have learned so far:

1) If at first you don't succeed, try again for heaven's sake. Eggs are cheap and it's a really quick process. Besides which, isn't that what learning is all about?

2) Likkered up husband is more appreciative of food.

3) Must learn to whisk left handed (doing all this manually is giving right arm and shoulder a bit too much of a workout).

4) Ask Santa for immersion blender (the turbo stick ensemble mentioned above) for Christmas

:laugh::laugh: Thank you for sharing your learning points, Maggie! That's always important.


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Mary Baker

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After a holiday weekend hiatus, saffron mayo has been made (successful on the first try!), and is chilling out in fridge pending tonight's dinner. I have a lovely beef roast in the crock pot...planning to shred/slice it for sandwiches, which provide a vehicle for the mayo. Will report in tomorrow on everybody's reaction.


Maggie

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Last evening's beef sandwiches with saffron mayo were delicious. The mayo was good and a beautiful color, but I think my favorite of this adventure so far has been the chipotle mayonnaise. Now, on to mustard!


Maggie

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What is viognier?

Edited to say, I see it is a white wine, I guess. Is it dry or sweet?


Edited by MaggieB (log)

Maggie

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What is viognier?

Edited to say, I see it is a white wine, I guess. Is it dry or sweet?

Mostly dry but there have been some dessert wines made from this particular grape.

It is still fairly rare, or so I have been told, but is apparently becoming more popular.

This site has some more information Viognier info.


Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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What a successful weekend it was! The saffron mayo gave repeat performances on leftover roast beef sandwiches, then got a new life mixed with cocktail sauce to dip some crab appetizers in...it was really tasty. I think I read to do that somewhere on eGullet.

I also whipped up a batch of ketchup - the flavor is good, if a bit "skunky". I think it may have been the influence of the sun dried tomatoes. I also made homemade french fries for the first time, to give the homemade ketchup a proper tasting session!

I also remembered to look for viognier at the liquor store, and was pleasantly surprised to find 3 varieties available. Mustard saga begins tonight. I bought my mustard seeds at an Amish bulk food grocery, so they wouldn't be so expensive.

I sure am having fun!


Maggie

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Maggie, You are an inspiration!


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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My mustard seeds are soaking, even as we speak. I'm pleased to see that canning is an option for this mustard - maybe if it's really great it can become part of my holiday gift giving! I enjoy canning, and my husband built me really neat shelves under the steps to display all the beautiful canned goods.

Trying to use an avatar for the first time - hope it works!

Edited to say... the avatar worked...can you tell what it is?


Edited by MaggieB (log)

Maggie

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Looks like a kitty with a drum.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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That's right Andie, that's my big fat boy cat named "Toes" because he's a Polydactl, also known as a Hemmingway Cat, who um, also eats mayonnaise?(must stay on topic) :wink:


Maggie

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One of my friends has a Maine Coon cat named Missy Mayonnaise because when she was a kitten she crawled into a mayonnaise jar that had fallen out of the trash, licked it clean and went to sleep in the jar. Now she is a very, very large cat - still likes mayo! No sandwich is safe and she can reach just about anything.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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What a sweet kitten story!

Oh, back to mustard . . . any somewhat heavy, fruity white will do. Chardonnay would also be a good choice. I like Viognier in the mustard because it's a very "muscular" white, strong, floral and sexy. Viogniers are usually not over-oaked either, so the clean fruit flavor comes through in the mayo. (Well, if you're a wine geek, anyway. :wink: )

Edited to correct: in the mustard, I meant!


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Mary Baker

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Sorry for the long delay in posting. Over the weekend I finished off my first batch of mustard. It smelled and tasted delicious before I sealed it into jelly jars. I have burgers on the menu for this week, eventually, to test it out on the husband.

So the weekend went by, had jury selection on Monday, lost my job on Tuesday, and the rest of the week has just flown by. Looks like I'll have a lot more time for eGullet now!

Seriously, this downsizing has been a long time coming, and I am relieved to have the big announcement over with. I have been wanting to enroll in our local Culinary Arts program, which begins August 29th, so I'm taking this as a sign that I should proceed. Let the next chapter of my life begin!

Anyway, back to mustard, soon I will be making the tarragon mustard recipe...I'll let you know when I get it together.


Maggie

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Sorry for the long delay in posting. Over the weekend I finished off my first batch of mustard. It smelled and tasted delicious before I sealed it into jelly jars. I have burgers on the menu for this week, eventually, to test it out on the husband.

So the weekend went by, had jury selection on Monday, lost my job on Tuesday, and the rest of the week has just flown by. Looks like I'll have a lot more time for eGullet now!

Seriously, this downsizing has been a long time coming, and I am relieved to have the big announcement over with. I have been wanting to enroll in our local Culinary Arts program, which begins August 29th, so I'm taking this as a sign that I should proceed. Let the next chapter of my life begin!

Anyway, back to mustard, soon I will be making the tarragon mustard recipe...I'll let you know when I get it together.

How about some photos of the finished product? Show off your creations.


Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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MaggieB,

Good luck in whatever awaits you in the upcoming months! And thanks for trying and reporting on the recipes for the rest of us.

Alex

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I've been thinking about those photos. I do love to take pictures of food, but, I do not have a digital camera - hope to get one soon. And I did have a great 35 mm camera, but it is broken, which means I am down to disposable cameras for the time being. I believe I can still post photos, and I will try, but there will be a delay as I will need development time and then I need to learn how to scan and post these photos. However, I will begin the process-you're never too old to learn new things! :biggrin:


Maggie

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had jury selection on Monday, lost my job on Tuesday,

:shock:

How interesting that you've decided to attend a culinary arts program! Good luck with your future path. Hmmm, perhaps we have a new eGCI instructor-in-training here. :wink:


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Mary Baker

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I have just finished my final assignment in the Basic Condiments course - my first eGCI adventure. It is Viognier French Tarragon Mustard, and it is whooee hothothot! But I gave it to my husband, and he said it was good. I could taste nothing but hot. I'm sure it will enhance the right sandwich sometime in the near future.

Thanks to our instructors and everyone who chimed in to help me through this - it was really fun. Since every day is Saturday now, I'm ready for a new course! When can we start?


Maggie

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Thanks, Maggie!

For anyone interested in some more kitchen science and mayo variations, there's an article in today's San Francisco Chronicle on the art of mayo, including variations: sauce vert, rouille, cilantro mayo, thousand island dressing, soy-sesame and mustard-dill mayos, along with serving suggestions.

Enjoy!


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Mary Baker

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I have just finished my final assignment in the Basic Condiments course - my first eGCI adventure. It is Viognier French Tarragon Mustard, and it is whooee hothothot! But I gave it to my husband, and he said it was good. I could taste nothing but hot. I'm sure it will enhance the right sandwich sometime in the near future.

Thanks to our instructors and everyone who chimed in to help me through this - it was really fun. Since every day is Saturday now, I'm ready for a new course! When can we start?

Do remember that with any mustard, from whatever source, whole seeds, dry mustard powder, etc., you can adjust the heat level by carefully heating it for short periods either in a double boiler or in the microwave. The microwave process is very quick, you do have to stir the mustard and let it rest after each heating (no more than 20 seconds) and taste it.

I have done this with some commercial mustards which were far too hot when first tasted.

The problem is that the raw heat of the mustard can overwhelm the other flavors and can actually cause the taste buds to have less sensitivity to other flavors for various periods of time.

I love the taste of mustard but also like to be able to taste the flavors of the other components that go into the blend and complement each other.

Just as too much heat in certain chiles can mask other flavors, so can too much heat in mustard or horseradish, etc.

It is fun to experiment. I have mixed my basic mustard, which is somewhat sweet, with various chile sauces, Indonesian sambals, chutneys and etc.

The results of some of these combinations have been incredible. Unfortunately I don't always keep notes so have to try and replicate them by guesswork.

In any event, it is fun to try.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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...there's an article in today's San Francisco Chronicle on the art of mayo, including variations:  sauce vert, rouille, ...

I am curious about Rouille, if anyone has insight. Wikipedia seems to think it's breadcrumb-based, rather than mayo based. And when I've made it from a Provence-born chef I knew's recipe, it was made by blending in roasted ball peppers to fresh aoili.


"Gourmandise is not unbecoming to women: it suits the delicacy of their organs and recompenses them for some pleasures they cannot enjoy, and for some evils to which they are doomed." Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin

MetaFooder: linking you to food | @foodtwit

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I am curious about Rouille, if anyone has insight. Wikipedia seems to think it's breadcrumb-based, rather than mayo based. And when I've made it from a Provence-born chef I knew's recipe, it was made by blending in roasted ball peppers to fresh aoili.

The version of a rouille I learned is similar to what you've described, aioli with roasted bell peppers which is then thickened with white bread(no crust) soaked in water.

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This is great! I've been wanting to make made-from-scratch ketchup for forever, now I can try it! I have two questions:

I was thinking of blending up some Roma tomatoes instead of using tomato paste; has anyone tried something like this?

Is there anything you could add to help the ketchup keep for longer? Two weeks is such a short time!

Thanks!

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