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aidensnd

How To Make Transfer Sheets

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I think I am going to order some premade transfer sheets!!

I dont understand why but my colored coca butter it stays on the sheets doesnt transfer on the chocolate when I put them on it ,I wait till it get dry the peel the sheet and the darn colored cocoa butter stays on the sheet!!!

I know there is something wrong cause I havent seen anyone here talking about this problem.So I dont know what that could be.


Vanessa

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Vanessa,

We still have a few issues with cocoa butter sticking to the transfer sheet and not to the chocolate, so we're not experts . . . yet. But here are some things you might try:

How long do you let your cocoa butter sheets set? Try letting them set at least overnight (if you're not already doing this).

Do you let the chocolate you pour onto the sheets set in a fridge? That might help.

And make very sure that the chocolate has completely set before removing the pieces. They should lift cleanly, without sticking, off the acetate.

For what it's worth, I've never had a similar problem with commercial transfer sheets. But making your own is a noble thing.

Cheers,

Steven


Steve Smith

Glacier Country

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Vanessa,

We still have a few issues with cocoa butter sticking to the transfer sheet and not to the chocolate, so we're not experts . . . yet.  But here are some things you might try:

How long do you let your cocoa butter sheets set?  Try letting them set at least overnight (if you're not already doing this).

Do you let the chocolate you pour onto the sheets set in a fridge? That might help.

And make very sure that the chocolate has completely set before removing the pieces.  They should lift cleanly, without sticking, off the acetate.

For what it's worth, I've never had a similar problem with commercial transfer sheets.  But making your own is a noble thing.

Cheers,

Steven

Thank you Thank you Steven :smile:

I actually didnt try all the things you have listed :raz: .I guess I have should treat the sheets like the painted molds ,so I will try to follow these steps then, before giving up ( but still probably buy some store bought :rolleyes: ).

Thank you again for taking the time to explain this to me .

Grazie


Edited by Desiderio (log)

Vanessa

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Vanessa,

I have been playing around a little bit and thought you might like to see this...my results are very crappy as I was just messing around with a bit of not so nice cocoa butter, etc.

I guess that's enough excuses:

gallery_10108_2820_404440.jpg

This is a picture of a fairly large rubber stamp. It has four designs, one on each side of the cube, leaving two sides clear for holding onto the stamp itself. I bought it at Michael's, the craft store.

gallery_10108_2820_777969.jpg

This picture is of a sheet of chocolate onto which I transfered the design.

I got the idea from another thread which discussed using rubber stamps to make transfers or designs on chocolate.

I melted some cocoa butter and used a paint roller (they sell very small ones for detailed work)...probably not food safe, but this was just an experiment. I rolled the cocoa butter onto the rubber stamp and stamped it onto a piece of acetate. I let it sit overnight. The next day, I spread a little bit of tempered chocolate onto the stamped images. After it crystallized, I peeled off the acetate and voila!

I'm trying to think of better ways to get the cocoa butter onto the stamp. The first time I did this, I just dipped the stamp into the cocoa butter, but it didn't allow for a clean impression of the image. The paint roller worked pretty well, but you lose a lot of cocoa butter in the fibers of the roller and I don't think it is food safe. I want to find a good quality sponge (more like a stamp pad) to do this with.

Another thing I don't love about this, or cocoa butter in general...it is murder to clean off of anything. Including your hands! It takes the hottest water you can stand and tons of soap. This might stop me from experimenting as I hate that feeling. Sort of like working with shortening :smile:

Anyway...just thought I'd show you what I'm up to.

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Cool -- I love the stamp too. They do sell stiff rubber rollers, like a printer would use for ink, much like these here CLICK. Still not sure on the food safe issue, but at least it isn't furry like a paint roller. If it can pick up the fine grooves of a fingerprint, it should work for your stamp.


Cheryl, The Sweet Side

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Vanessa,

I have been playing around a little bit and thought you might like to see this...my results are very crappy as I was just messing around with a bit of not so nice cocoa butter, etc.

I guess that's enough excuses:

gallery_10108_2820_404440.jpg

This is a picture of a fairly large rubber stamp.  It has four designs, one on each side of the cube, leaving two sides clear for holding onto the stamp itself.  I bought it at Michael's, the craft store.

gallery_10108_2820_777969.jpg

This picture is of a sheet of chocolate onto which I transfered the design.

I got the idea from another thread which discussed using rubber stamps to make transfers or designs on chocolate.

I melted some cocoa butter and used a paint roller (they sell very small ones for detailed work)...probably not food safe, but this was just an experiment.  I rolled the cocoa butter onto the rubber stamp and stamped it onto a piece of acetate.  I let it sit overnight.  The next day, I spread a little bit of tempered chocolate onto the stamped images.  After it crystallized, I peeled off the acetate and voila!

I'm trying to think of better ways to get the cocoa butter onto the stamp.  The first time I did this, I just dipped the stamp into the cocoa butter, but it didn't allow for a clean impression of the image.  The paint roller worked pretty well, but you lose a lot of cocoa butter in the fibers of the roller and I don't think it is food safe.  I want to find a good quality sponge (more like a stamp pad) to do this with.

Another thing I don't love about this, or cocoa butter in general...it is murder to clean off of anything.  Including your hands!  It takes the hottest water you can stand and tons of soap.  This might stop me from experimenting as I hate that feeling.  Sort of like working with shortening  :smile:

Anyway...just thought I'd show you what I'm up to.

Simply wonderfull!!

I just love the result you obtained , I think it looks very neat ( I know might be impossible to achieve the perfection of the store bought ones ) but it sure look great .I havent try make anymore transfer sheet ,I was on mother's day production, I will have to get my hand dirty again soon though.

Thank you for showing your experiment I really really love it :biggrin:


Vanessa

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Alanamoana,

Nice results with the rubber stamp!

We too saw the stamp thread and began a bunch of experimenting, and got really excited by the results. I think we're at a point now where we could do a demo for other readers. In the meantime, here's some info:

This picture shows some early experiments with the process. In this case the pieces are solid tmpered couverture poured onto the transfer sheet (seen in the background).

choc-cust-early.jpg

Apparently rubber stamping is a huge hobby (associated with scrapbooking). We have a local hobby store that makes custom stamps right from computer files. They're laser cut and the detail is pretty amazing. We pay just $5.00 for a 1-1/4" square custom stamp (ideal size for palets).

We also use a standard stamp pad. You can buy blank ones and "ink" them with cocoa butter. The ones we use are made by Adirondack. The box says they are "non toxic."

The amount of titanium dioxide you use in your "ink" is critical to the process, because the opacity will enhance the brightness of the finished items. This will take experimentation. So far we've stuck to a gold-yellow because it seems to read the best.

One technique we learned from "stampers" was to touch the wet pad to the stamp (rather than vice-versa). This gives you more control over how much ink goes on to the stamp.

We use a hair dryer to keep the cocoa butter ink at about 95F and slightly damp. You don't want the crevices of the pad to fill up with ink. Wipe the stamp frequently if you need to.

If you make a mistake, just wipe the ink off the acetate and do it again. After you've finished making the chocolates, gently wash the acetate sheet and reuse.

With practice the end results can be pretty good (but never as clean and bright as commercial transfer sheets). Stull, stamping opens up a whole new world to chocolatiers.

I'll try to put together and post a demo in the next week or two. In the meantime, have fun!

Cheers,

Steve


Steve Smith

Glacier Country

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Apparently rubber stamping is a huge hobby (associated with scrapbooking). We have a local hobby store that makes custom stamps right from computer files. They're laser cut and the detail is pretty amazing. We pay just $5.00 for a 1-1/4" square custom stamp (ideal size for palets).

We also use a standard stamp pad. You can buy blank ones and "ink" them with cocoa butter. The ones we use are made by Adirondack. The box says they are "non toxic."

The amount of titanium dioxide you use in your "ink" is critical to the process, because the opacity will enhance the brightness of the finished items. This will take experimentation. So far we've stuck to a gold-yellow because it seems to read the best.

One technique we learned from "stampers" was to touch the wet pad to the stamp (rather than vice-versa). This gives you more control over how much ink goes on to the stamp. 

We use a hair dryer to keep the cocoa butter ink at about 95F and slightly damp. You don't want the crevices of the pad to fill up with ink.  Wipe the stamp frequently if you need to.

Steve, thanks for more ideas. I knew you could buy "blank" stamp pads, but could never find them at the local Michael's. I guess I'll have to go to on-line sources. Also, the fact that you can get custom stamps so inexpensively is great! I'll have to see what resources there are around here.

With the one rubber stamp that I have (with the four designs)...it seems the designs that are more just outlines work the best. They give sharp clean images. The other designs that have a lot of "solid" surface area tend to hold too much cocoa butter and when you lift up the stamp you get areas of blobby color. You know what I mean, I'm sure! edited to add: compare the solid letter "G" you've stamped to the outline letter "G"...just cleaner and nicer looking on the outline.

When you say you use a hair dryer to keep the cocoa butter warm, do you just heat the ink pad itself? I guess you could heat up the stamp too to keep the cocoa butter from setting up in the crevices of the stamp...

Well, it is fun! Also, if you want to customize things, much cheaper than other companies who charge insane set-up fees for artwork! Unless, of course, you have to make thousands...

Also, what kind of acetate do you use? The firm kind or the kind you find purchased transfer sheets screened onto?

Thanks again for your photos and comments!

Alana


Edited by alanamoana (log)

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I recently found this website that has an alphabetical list of stamp companies, a list of "angel" companies that will allow you to sell their hand stamped image and a forum for stampers. Lots of info.

http://www.rubberstampinglinks.com/


Pamela Wilkinson

www.portlandfood.org

Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."

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Another note from an old stamper...do not immerse your stamps in water. You'll lose the foam cushion that holds the rubber onto the wood or acrylic block. It will start to slide. If this happens, you can nuke it in the microwave to peel it all apart and buy a new sheet of the grey foam cushion from a rubber stamp store and replace it.


Pamela Wilkinson

www.portlandfood.org

Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."

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I've just returned from the Philadelphia Candy Show with exciting new techniques to share.  If you haven't heard of www.designerstencils, check them out.  Their stencils are fabulous!  They are also designing large stencil sheets for making transfer sheets and will also be selling acetate sheets soon.

While there, I demonstrated air brushing stencil designs on chocolate and acetate.  You can also use tempered chocolate smoothed across the top of the stencil with an off set spatula to create designs.  But what's really exciting is using a stenciling brush to apply warm colored cocoa butter to acetate sheets or directly onto chocolate.  Imagine what you can do on the lip of a dessert plate!

Now that I've used some of Chef Rubber's fabulous pre-colored cocoa butters, I'll never bother mixing my own (with powdered food coloring).  He sells over 100 colors that are ready to use.  All you do is warm the plastic bottle gently in the microwave to no more than 86 degrees and it's ready to use for stenciling, air brushing, and lots of other things.  His website, www.chefrubber.com, is a gold mine for chocolate artisans.

After working (and playing) with chocolate for over 30 years, it's great to discover new magic tricks to add ti my repertoire.

how does one air brush stencils on to chocolate? i would love to hear more about it, as well as the large stencils for transfer sheets.

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i tried the method today, filled an empty stamp pad with a white colored (titan dioxide) cocoa butter and stamped onto acetate. results on the acetate were quite good, but when i poured the temperedd chocolate the "stamping" would stick to the acetate, and not to the chocolate. on little sheet i put right in the freezer, and the transfer worked fine, the other one where it didnt work i left at room temp.... any suggestions ???

maybe its the acetate... ???

chocolate too cold ??

cheers

t.


toertchen toertchen

patissier chocolatier cafe

cologne, germany

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i tried the method today, filled an empty stamp pad with a white colored (titan dioxide) cocoa butter and stamped onto acetate. results on the acetate were quite good, but when i poured the temperedd chocolate the "stamping" would stick to the acetate, and not to the chocolate. on little sheet i put right in the freezer, and the transfer worked fine, the other one where it didnt work i left at room temp....  any suggestions ???

maybe its the acetate...  ???

chocolate too cold ??

cheers

t.

Correct... chocolate was too cold. Slightly warmer should fix the problem, as long as you're still in temper.


John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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Regarding air brushing stencils onto acetate sheets: Lay the stencil on the acetate, holding it in place with your finger. I use Chef Rubber's colored cocoa butter melted no higher than 88 degrees. Fill the cup and spray. For best results hold the gun slightly angled to the surface as you spray (without allowing any of the cocoa butter to flow out). If you hold the gun at a sharp angle, the air pressure sometimes lifts the stencil and causes the design to smear. Give the sprayed design plenty of time to dry completely. I put the sheet in the refrigerator for about 5 minutes, take it out and allow it to come to room temperature. If the cocoa butter is still tacky at this point, it means that you probably overheated the cocoa butter and broke its temper.

My best advice when air brushing with cocoa butter is to warm the tip of the gun with a hair dryer before spraying; it helps to keep the tip of the gun from clogging. I also find that the best way to clean the brush is with Dawn dishwashing detergent and hot water.

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Regarding air brushing stencils onto acetate sheets:  Lay the stencil on the acetate, holding it in place with your finger.  I use Chef Rubber's colored cocoa butter melted no higher than 88 degrees.  Fill the cup and spray.  For best results hold the gun slightly angled to the surface as you spray (without allowing any of the cocoa butter to flow out).  If you hold the gun at a sharp angle, the air pressure sometimes lifts the stencil and causes the design to smear.  Give the sprayed design plenty of time to dry completely.  I put the sheet in the refrigerator for about 5 minutes, take it out and allow it to come to room temperature.  If the cocoa butter is still tacky at this point, it means that you probably overheated the cocoa butter and broke its temper.

My best advice when air brushing with cocoa butter is to warm the tip of the gun with a hair dryer before spraying; it helps to keep the tip of the gun from clogging.  I also find that the best way to clean the brush is with Dawn dishwashing detergent and hot water.

Elaine,

What sort of airbrush are you using?

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Correct... chocolate was too cold.  Slightly warmer should fix the problem, as long as you're still in temper.

i temper with mycryo, i usually have around 35 c on tempering (white choc) how high can i heat it without loosing the temper ???

cheers

t.


Edited by schneich (log)

toertchen toertchen

patissier chocolatier cafe

cologne, germany

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Correct... chocolate was too cold.  Slightly warmer should fix the problem, as long as you're still in temper.

i temper with mycryo, i usually have around 35 c on tempering (white choc) how high can i heat it without loosing the temper ???

cheers

t.

At 35C I don't see how you're in temper... seems way too high.


John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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I use mycryo as well , but I work around 31 for dark , 29 for milk.35 seems t high for me as well.


Vanessa

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i mean i add the mycyro stuff at 35, just as the manual tells me...

normally i wait for a few minutes and check the temper on a cold marble.

if the temper is good i smear the acetate ;-)

so is my temperature maybe too hot to bind to the transfer ???? that would be weird...

p.s. callebaut says you should add the mycyro at 35c. sometimes it seems to me that the tiny mycryo crystals dont really "melt" the chocolate at 35c, it looks as it has tiny breadcrumbs in it...

now i use to add the mycryo at 35,2 or 35,3 and it perfeclty melts...


toertchen toertchen

patissier chocolatier cafe

cologne, germany

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