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Molded Chocolates: Technique Questions [MERGED TOPIC]


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When chocolate is rapidly crystallizing (ie setting up) it gives off heat - the "latent heat of crystallization". Depending on the mass of chocolate, the air circulation, whether air is trapped in an upside down mold - the heat can reach levels that will throw off the temper of the chocolate around it. It is the reason you see streaks of bloom on the left over chocolate you pour out onto a piece of parchment when you are done.

So putting the molds into the fridge (10º C less than room temperature is ideal) while they are rapidly crystallizing (signalled by seeing the chocolate starting to become matte around the edges of the mold) will prevent this from happening.

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So I'm not doing anything wrong then? Like I said it turns out beautiful as long as they're 5 minutes in the fridge. I just wasn't sure if that was correct or if I was messing something up and the fridge step was covering up my mistake.

I can't even begin to tell you how long this was on my mind. I'm glad I'm not doing amything wrong, I too always thought I was covering my mistake, but it was working. Thanks for asking this and taking the time to explain the little details, and thank you Kerry for the answers.

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That appears to be some sort of cocoa butter application - I would guess untempered cocoa butter.

ETA if you're cleaning without detergent, you're not getting all the fat off the mold.

Edited by keychris (log)
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I have a question along this line... I can't seem to get my finished chocolates out of the mold without sticking them in the freezer first. Does this mean there is something wrong with the temper (I use a tempering machine)? If I leave them in the freezer for a few minutes they pop out nicely and they are shiny and have a nice 'snap'. But today I forgot a tray in there for longer and after I popped them out they began to sweat and they lost that nice 'snap'. I'm sure they won't be looking very shiny in the morning either. How do I avoid this? It's such a shame to do all that work and then lose temper trying to get the chocolates out of the mold!

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Try fridge for 20 minutes then let them sit in the molds for another 20 on the counter. I have no problem with condensation and they pop right out for me.

As far as I can tell, as long as you leave them in the mold no condensation occurs so let them come back to room temp that way, then flip them over and let them come out.

Note: I haven't tried leaving them in the mold with ones from the freezer. I may just be getting lucky with the condensation issue but I've been trying to be very careful with the 20 minute time in the fridge and so far that's worked for me. I've heard using a heat gun to "dry" the truffles can help after condensation has happened and someone else told me you can air brush them to restore shine but that makes no sense. You'd be airbrushing OVER the spots.

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ETA if you're cleaning without detergent, you're not getting all the fat off the mold.

Do you need all of the fat off of the mold? I've been using detergent (and sanitizer) but was thinking none of that was needed if I was doing same chocolate again. Meaning if I did dark and am doing dark again, I could do so with just a quick polishing of the cavities rather than a full blown cleaning of the mold.

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That appears to be some sort of cocoa butter application - I would guess untempered cocoa butter.

ETA if you're cleaning without detergent, you're not getting all the fat off the mold.

I use only hot water to clean, then polish with a tea towel before molding. Some people don't even wash their molds!

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I would argue that you shouldn't need refrigeration to get a properly set shell. Do you test the chocolate on paper before molding to make sure it is in good temper, or do you just trust the machine? In what position are your molds after casting the shells? Standing them on edge allows better air circulation than laying them flat on the table. I only use the fridge if the kitchen is particularly warm or if I'm molding thicker bars.

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I agree with Kerry. Chocolate unfortunately maintains heat in itself. I don't know the word in english. Therefore you need to create a correct cooling of the shells. To control your cristalisation, ideally you can test it with a little bit of chocolate on the tip of your room temp scraper (room at approx 20/21oC) or marble or piece of paper. The absence of streaks, or... will indicate to you correct cristalisation.

Each time you fill your mold remember to stir your chocolate (this has a function). Once your mold has started to set, put in on a tray in the fridge for 1.5 min then flip it for 3 (the flipping prevents condensation to set on the chocolate).

If you have a room at 21 degrees C and immediately fill them with ganache, the fridge can then wait a few minutes. But if you put cacao butter on it, it s a safer bet to fridge it.

Better exercise for you, try adding 3 to 5% of cacao butter to your couverture. Play with that in order to have thinner shells and a better reaction of your chocolate.

For the freezer, i would avoid freezing chocolates in molds. The thrmic choc is what creates condensation. Truth be told you will never get them back to original state and most likely have a weird reaction from the ganache. If you do want to freeze your chocolates, place them in a ziploc bag, extract as much air as possible and zip it (or vacuum pack), then freeze. To bring back from freezer, take it out of the freezer, place the sealed bag in the coldest part of the fridge for 24h, then 10h in the warmest part of the fridge. Then use/eat.

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Not to sound rude but, is your chocolate cristalized when you are using it? Are you spraying cacao butter on the molds?

It doesn't appear to me that it comes from a cleaning phase but more from the chocolate itself.

As Chocolot has mentionned, take a hairdrier or heat gun (be carefull) warm up the cavities and polish with a cotton ball or makeup removable disk or cheese cloth ....

Then make sure your mold is not too cold when you cast your cristalized chocolate. Make sure your room is not too humid, nor too warm....... (all the other fun factors)

Once you casted, let the chocolate set slightly and put it in the fridge for 2 min, then put it on a tray upside down for another 8/10 min. take out and let themselves release slowly. If they come out bloomed again then you have a cristalisation issue or bad molds (but you said they werent scratched or anything)

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Like pastrygirl, when my kitchen is >71 degrees F, my chocolate shells set properly without the aid of refrigeration. I also stand my molds on edge while the chocolate is setting up. I do use the fridge for 10 minutes or less if the kitchen is warm or if I am molding bars or large figures (bunny rabbits, eggs, etc.). When I use the fridge, I always wait until the chocolate starts to set (goes from looking wet to matte) before it goes in the fridge.

And then there was the NOTL workshop where the room was sooooo cold we were all wearing our jackets... a new set of problems for working with cocoa butter and chocolates. :)

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I use only hot water to clean, then polish with a tea towel before molding. Some people don't even wash their molds!

I should point out I never wash mine either! But if you've got a layer of poorly tempered cocoa butter on there, I was just pointing out that you might want to use detergent to get that off :)

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Stop making this so difficult. Put the molds in a warm oven for a minute and wipe them clean with a soft towel. I did the math and it's exactly 1 billion times more efficient and easier than washing with soap and water.

Always speak your mind. Those who mind don't matter and those who matter won't mind.

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Stop making this so difficult. Put the molds in a warm oven for a minute and wipe them clean with a soft towel. I did the math and it's exactly 1 billion times more efficient and easier than washing with soap and water.

Exactly. I usually just run my heat gun over the whole mold and wipe the outside with a paper towel. Then use cotton batting to clean the cavities. I gave up on the whole soap and water thing about the second time I molded. If the "seasoning" thing is true (cocoa butter residue building up), then washing them just defeats the purpose. I have really bad water (I live next to the ocean) and there are spots left on everything when air drying, I know it would screw up the molds.

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Thanks for all the replies! Just to clarify, I put the finished tray of chocolates in the freezer for 2-4 mins just so I can pop them out of the mold. Otherwise, no matter how hard I tap, they won't come out. I only put them in the freezer after they have been filled and capped and they are completely set, not still wet. I'm thinking the tips about standing the molds on edge is for the first step? Is that for when I fill the molds initially? Usually, I pour the chocolate from the machine onto the mold, spread it evenly, tap the mold, then pour it back into the machine's bowl. I flip it upside down and tap it again to get out the rest of the excess and scrape it again, then I leave it to dry upright while I work on the ganache. It's possible the kitchen is to warm. But the chocolate sets well on the tip of a spoon. I'll try the trick about refrigeration and keeping them in the molds for a while before popping them out, maybe that will work out better.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Greweling also suggests refrigerating shelled molds for 5 minutes. It's not long enough to "chill" the molds, so condensation isn't a problem. I also put finished molds in to the refrigerator for up to an hour before tapping out the pieces. You can tell when the molds are ready by looking at the underside of the mold and looking for the pieces to pull away from the mold. It's easy to see when this happens. Condensation on the finished pieces can be a problem if the relative humidity is high. If so, then let the pieces come back up to room temp. Following this method gives me a consistently high shine.

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Steve Lebowitz

Doer of All Things

Steven Howard Confections

Slicing a warm slab of bacon is a lot like giving a ferret a shave. No matter how careful you are, somebody's going to get hurt - Alton Brown, "Good Eats"

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  • 2 weeks later...

Gary,

I wanted to thank you for bringing up the issue of refrigerating shells--and also Kerry for confirming this practice. Interestingly, it is not mentioned at all by Peter Greweling (and therefore I never thought of the refrigeration procedure). I am doing my first batch since this discussion, and I added the chilling time. What a difference! A tray of hearts, filled with Greweling's cherry kirsch ganache and made bright red with my first airbrushing attempt (fairly successful, I would say in all modesty), fell out of the mold before I could even give it a twist. Is there anything so satisfying as that sound when the pieces fall?--as long as there is something to catch them!

Many thanks for the help.

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  • 2 months later...

Hi everyone!
I have been having some trouble with capping molded chocolates. This is one of the only frustrating things that I deal with in our chocolate business. It looks as if the cap is not adhereing to the rest of the molded chocolate and it develops a small crack where they come together. I have tried everything that I can think of...heating before capping, not heating, using different utensils, using the chocolate at different viscosities, and so on. This happens with almost all of our molds no matter what the shape. Does anyone have any ideas why this is happening and how I can fix it? I end up having to cap them twice, which makes things very time consuming.
Thanks!!
Michelle
Pizzelle's Confections

I am still trying to figure out how to upload a photo.

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The chocolate that I use is El Rey 61%. After decorating and casting with chocolate, I fill with ganache and let crystallize overnight. Depending on how much chocolate I need, I either use a mol d art melter or a JKV molding machine. I heat the edges slightly with a heat gun, then ladle on the chocolate and use a palet knife to cap the molds. Then five minutes later, the cracks show. The ganache or caramel does not leak out of this crack, but this still can't be good for structure or shelf life.

I am having trouble posting a picture, so I can email it if that would help. My email is michelle@pizzellesconfections.com.

Thanks!!

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the technique you're describing doing sounds quite textbook (well, it's how I do it!)

Perhaps you're filling your ganache a fraction too high and the cap is a fraction too thin?

Edited by keychris (log)
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