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Molded and Filled Chocolates: Troubleshooting and Techniques


rookie
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Interesting that we've gotten such wildly different advice. This topic has come up several times over the years. Which manufacturers suggested doing this?

Steve Lebowitz

Doer of All Things

Steven Howard Confections

Slicing a warm slab of bacon is a lot like giving a ferret a shave. No matter how careful you are, somebody's going to get hurt - Alton Brown, "Good Eats"

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Uh... I do't think toothpaste will work. As it is, I can't even get a q-tip into the crevices.

As you can see in the pic, some of the cavities are clean, and some stick bad.

I think....

I think it might be water spots.

I don't usjualy wash the molds, but every couple of months, they get really grotty, so I toss them in the commercial d/washer. This has a cycle of about 2 mins, and uses liquid detergents and rinse aids. I've got about 25 or so molds and they do get washed every now and then, but only have had serious issues with sticking now--same dishwasher, same soaps, same everythibg else.

After they come out of the d/w, I do "the chicken" with the molds. That is, I take one mold in each hand and flop my arms up and down, shaking as much water as possible out, then shake some more, then place upside down on a cooling grid or in a toothed d/washing rack overnight.

If I have time, I buff out with those facial pads, or a q-tip.

This particular mold was sprayed (mouth atomizer) with cocoa butter, dried overnight, then filled not once, but twice with tempered 70% couverture. Some slight sticking, but nothing major.

When I molded for bon bons, I filled as usual, tipped out, scraped clean, allwed to harden, and then filled with a butter ganache.

I'll fill the mold again with solid 70% over and ove gain untill I can get this problem figured out....

guitar and wokbench 009.jpg

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Edward, put the mold thru a household dishwasher that has a much longer cycle. Then during or after the rinse cycle, take out and rinse again with a running tap. Get your compressor and dry the cavities as buffing with towel is too difficult. Derrick from Callebaut suggested drying with an air compressor.

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Thanks.

Don't have a compressor yet, but will use a hairdryer on "cold".

I'll be seeing Derrick in St. Hycinth in May, where I'll be taking a workshop there for a week.

May I ask who that is and where? Or should I already know?

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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Thanks.

Don't have a compressor yet, but will use a hairdryer on "cold".

I'll be seeing Derrick in St. Hycinth in May, where I'll be taking a workshop there for a week.

May I ask who that is and where? Or should I already know?

Rather sure Edward J is taking this class with Derrick Tu Tan Pho. The same Derrick who will be presenting at the 2011 Chocolate & Confectionary Conference!

Edited by curls (log)
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Yup, that's the one.

Tried to take it last year, but "stuff" got in the way.

Right now I'm stocking up the freezer with pastry prep for my one week "holiday", bunny production is at full tilt, and by the end of the month will be making fresh batches of all 25 variaities of bon bons hold over until I get back.

And when I get back, I run right smack dab into Mother's day, with full houses for Ma's day brunche and high tea.....

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  • 4 weeks later...

I have several of the white molds like those, and I tend to have better luck with them than the clear.

I never wash my molds. I scrape off as much as possible, then melt every thing with my heat gun. Once it's softened, I wipe them down, then polish the cavities with cotton batting. For the molds with crevices (I have a fleur de lys that's like that) I use a Q-tip. I have the worst water here, it leaves a white spotty residue if anything air dries, so no washing. When I did wash some that were hopelessly stuck, I gave them a rinse with distilled water and that helped with spots.

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  • 9 months later...
  • 1 month later...

Hello,

I was wondering if anyone could help me out with a question about the results I got when I used a mold for the first time. In the attached photo you'll see that some of my molded candies came out fine while others did not. I am not sure if the problem was that my shell walls were too thin, or if it was because this is the first time I have used this mold. The problem was the flat surface on the bottom of the mold -- non of the sticking was on the sides. Is it normal to have problems the first time a mold is used?

Any feedback would be appreciated.

April 12 076.JPG

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OK -- that makes sense. I chilled them in the refrigerator for 15 minutes and then put them out to thaw, but I did not check the temperature to make sure they had made it to room temp before I tried to un-mold (de-mold?) So next time I will be more aware of the temperature.

Thanks for the tip.

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  • 2 months later...

exactly... There was a smear of milk (test looked OK, buta fter 20 minutes the test had bloomed) on the top of the chocolate (base of mold) and it didn't contract away from the surface, stuck, had to bash the bejeezus out of it to get them to come out... luckily there were plenty of people on hand willing to taste test those ones LOL

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exactly... There was a smear of milk (test looked OK, buta fter 20 minutes the test had bloomed) on the top of the chocolate (base of mold) and it didn't contract away from the surface, stuck, had to bash the bejeezus out of it to get them to come out... luckily there were plenty of people on hand willing to taste test those ones LOL

Some time, and sometimes some more time, in the freezer will usually help the more stubborn ones come out. Then even if they aren't pretty, they are more intact.

A different kind of disappointment: happily made three molds of bonbons on Tuesday for a catering order I had next week. Checked the banquet menus today, and no more chocolates on that party. :angry: Oh well, guess we'll see how well they freeze, and if nothing else they can be part of the spread at my brother's wedding in 6 weeks. That's what I get for trying to stay ahead.

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  • 4 weeks later...

My moulds are driving me mad, my chocolate is in temper (I've checked) and moulding bonbon's isn't an issue, assumed it might be residual heat so moulded in layers (they're solids), made sure they weren't shocked by putting layers between the mould and the kitchen surface, made sure the mould's warm enough, that my colours are in temper (this occurs on non-coloured chocolates that are solids too) and keeping an eye on room temp and humidity. What am I doing wrong? I've even pre-sprayed the moulds with clear cocao butter.

IMG_2095_400x600.jpg

Sian

"You can't buy happiness, but you can buy chocolate, and that's kinda the same thing really."

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Calebaut milk chocolate at 30. Also having the same problem with dark, but not the white. Can, ironically, mould the lips fine though in any colour which is a rather large mould.

Try pushing it to 32 and see what happens.

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it looks like (from that picture) the milk chocolate is OK - they're contracting away from the walls ok - but the colour isn't contracting away with the chocolate. I know most people around here say that the temperature of cocoa butter isn't important, but I've found it seems to be - if you airbrush it in, what temperature is it before you apply? It was recommended to us in class that you have it at 32-34C before spraying (after stirring it down from 45C).

Was there much time between applying the cocoa butter and the chocolate?

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I've been playing and think it's either an issue with the cocoa butter or adhesion between the chocolate and cocoa butter, tried plain choc in the moulds, all fine, sprayed half the frog in each mould with the coloured cocoa butter, it left most of the butter in the mould and the choc half was beautifully shiny, looked to be perfectly tempered on cutting, I'm still casting as a thin layer of choc, letting it set and then filling with inclusions and choc.

I took the chocolate up to 32, made sure it wasn't over stirred. I've tried spraying, leaving it for 5 minuted then casting, spraying, putting it in the fridge to set up then casting about 10 mins after, and I currently am testing with 1 I sprayed yesterday and will be casting today.

Is it because there is a lot of cocoa butter being used, or am I barking up the wrong tree?

(Please ignore the bubbles, this was just a test casting so didn't put it on the vibrating table.)

IMG_2105b.jpg

As you can see the highly decorated frog is most damaged, whereas the lesser decorated one has few imperfections, both only where the cocoa butter was...

Sian

"You can't buy happiness, but you can buy chocolate, and that's kinda the same thing really."

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