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Lunch at Salumi


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Thursday, Feb 3rd.

726-1717 in Seattle and 425-453-1717 on the Eastside for delivery.

I'll be running it on the slice bar that Saturday here at the University Pizzeria.

"So, do you want me to compromise your meal for you?" - Waitress at Andy's Diner, Dec 4th, 2004.

The Fat Boy Guzzle --- 1/2 oz each Jack Daniels, Wild Turkey, Southern Comfort, Absolut Citron over ice in a pint glass, squeeze 1/2 a lemon and top with 7-up...Credit to the Bar Manager at the LA Cafe in Hong Kong who created it for me on my hire. Thanks, Byron. Hope you are well!

http://bloatitup.com

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  • 5 months later...

Another "finally made it to Salumi" here. There's no question that the meats are first-rate. I tried a couple in line and-- since they were out of lamb prosciutto-- had the culatello sandwich. The culatello is everything I could ask for in prosciutto; wonderful stuff. My folks had roasted lamb which was also quite good: juicy, flavorful.

But I have to say that the bread was absolutely awful. It was a round roll that was pale, doughy and bland, with almost no crust or flavor. Other sandwiches-- porchettas, for example-- were served on nice-looking slices of baguette, but not the cold cured meats. I walked away mystified: why would a place that takes such care with their meats spoil their sandwiches by serving them on shitty bread? It's weird. I'd go back to Salumi (and no doubt will, the next time I'm in Seattle), but, I think, just to buy the meat, and make my own sandwich off-site.

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But I have to say that the bread was absolutely awful.  It was a round roll that was pale, doughy and bland, with almost no crust or flavor.  Other sandwiches-- porchettas, for example-- were served on nice-looking slices of baguette, but not the cold cured meats.  I walked away mystified: why would a place that takes such care with their meats spoil their sandwiches by serving them on shitty bread?  It's weird.  I'd go back to Salumi (and no doubt will, the next time I'm in Seattle), but, I think, just to buy the meat, and make my own sandwich off-site.

They'll use the baguette if you ask and they have enough. I think the round, soft bread is from La Panzanella bakery. The bread does serve well to soak up the olive oil-based dressings they use. I like the bread although I do think it is too much and offsets the bread/meat ratio. I simply pick things apart as I eat.

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yesterday's special was fennel sausage (on italian) i think salumi's marinara is exceptionally good. perfect salt, perfect tomato flavor. clearly a very simple recipe with nothing but top-notch ingredients.

i agree with andrew about the round rolls - doughy and bad. i always pick the good stuff off of them.

next time i suggest getting the meat and cheese plate (i always get one to go) it's got a great variety and comes with a few slices of baguette, or you could swing by essential bakery just up the road in pioneer square.

from overheard in new york:

Kid #1: Paper beats rock. BAM! Your rock is blowed up!

Kid #2: "Bam" doesn't blow up, "bam" makes it spicy. Now I got a SPICY ROCK! You can't defeat that!

--6 Train

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I'm glad I'm not the only one bothered by the bread. I mentioned it to my sister and she insisted that she loves the Panzanella rolls. Which just seems crazy to me, but whatev'.

I kinda got the sense that Salumi isn't too interested in their sandwiches, just the meat: the cheese (domestic provolone, mozz) and other toppings (grilled onions) were pretty boring. But if you bought your meat there and picked up some good bread, cheese, etc. elsewhere, you could have a truly world-beating sandwich.

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I kinda got the sense that Salumi isn't too interested in their sandwiches, just the meat: the cheese (domestic provolone, mozz) and other toppings (grilled onions) were pretty boring.  But if you bought your meat there and picked up some good bread, cheese, etc. elsewhere, you could have a truly world-beating sandwich.

If you are referring to the 'provolone picante' then that is imported. The mozzarella is made in-house.

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that's annoying, andrew, because that provolone is very good. i wish you'd been properly informed. it's also a little odd, since the folks working there are generally very knowledgable. i did notice a couple of guys who i hadn't seen before - maybe they're filling in for others who are on vacation. in addition to the provolone piccante and fresh mozzarella, they also have a gorgonzola (well, i should say it's a soft italian blue) that comes with the meat, cheese and (3 token) olive plate.

the day i was there (i think the day after you) they also had as the veggie side dish some seasoned (pickled or vinegared i think) italian peppers. i agree that the peppers and onion that top the sandwiches don't add a lot, but the seasoned ones looked bright and fresh.

i think you're totally right that meat is the focus - but when aunt izzy is there making gnocchi...even the meat takes a back seat.

from overheard in new york:

Kid #1: Paper beats rock. BAM! Your rock is blowed up!

Kid #2: "Bam" doesn't blow up, "bam" makes it spicy. Now I got a SPICY ROCK! You can't defeat that!

--6 Train

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Dayne and I went today and got the pleasure of running into Vengroff picking up his proscuitto! very fun. Also had the pleasure of having a vegetarian in line behind us ask for a 'non meat sandwich' LOL!! good times, good times! :laugh:

Reese thanks for the tip on ordering the meat plate, I normally go with a sandwich but today got meat and cheese and was very happy!

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Ohhh Salumi - how I miss it already... I was there a couple of weekends ago (just two hours away from Canada) and bought some of their spicy Salami - but I forgot it at my friend's place. I could shoot myself.

They will DHL their product accross the US - but not into Canada. Aaaugh! It is like some form of torture. That house salami of theirs is sooo good - sweet porky goodness pearled with just enough fat to remind who's the boss.

Well - consoling myself with this thread will have to do for now.

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next time i suggest getting the meat and cheese plate (i always get one to go) it's got a great variety and comes with a few slices of baguette, or you could swing by essential bakery just up the road in pioneer square.

Grand Central Bakery? Main location with great selection is on 1st, right by Elliott Bay Books. (I had lunch there the other day, which was pleasant, and shopped at the Paper Cat next door, which is probably the best stationery store I've ever been to.)

Hungry Monkey May 2009
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  • 2 months later...

I had a hearty lunch at Salumi yesterday with some Seattle Egulleters. This is what I had:

Meat plate:

salumimeatplate.jpg

Porchetta (not the prettiest sandwich I've had, but DAMN it was the TASTIEST!! :biggrin: )

salumiporchetta.jpg

I don't think I could ever get past the porchetta if I lived in Seattle and had access to Salumi all the time. It was that good.

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Over thenext few days I'm moving to Chinatown and will be living within about 5 minutes of Salumi.

I am:

screwed.

(or at least my waistline is)

Bacon starts its life inside a piglet-shaped cocoon, in which it receives all the nutrients it needs to grow healthy and tasty.

-baconwhores.com

Bacon, the Food of Joy....

-Sarah Vowell

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Over thenext few days I'm moving to Chinatown and will be living within about 5 minutes of Salumi.

I am:

screwed.

(or at least my waistline is)

Excellent. I always wanted to live there!

-Kathy

"Save Donald Duck and Fuck Wolfgang Puck."

-- State Senator John Burton, joking about

how the bill to ban production of foie gras in

California was summarized for signing by

Gov. Schwarzenegger.

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  • 7 months later...

I had an incredible bison sausage dish (served with braised greens which were a little salty) a few weeks ago. I think it was one of their daily specials and I urge you all to try it if it appears again! It was delicious--chewy, not too fatty, gamey. Mmmm....

Also tried the veal breast sandwich, which was also good, but there was too much bread.

(I'm having a big lunch there on Friday! Will take pictures... :smile: )

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  • 2 weeks later...
I had an incredible bison sausage dish (served with braised greens which were a little salty) a few weeks ago. I think it was one of their daily specials and I urge you all to try it if it appears again! It was delicious--chewy, not too fatty, gamey. Mmmm....

Also tried the veal breast sandwich, which was also good, but there was too much bread.

(I'm having a big lunch there on Friday! Will take pictures... :smile: )

Was that last Friday?

BTW - we have noted the change of reference from "date" to "boyfriend". Have fun.

I had the cinnamon pork this week - too much bread, too little pork. Keep telling myself, order the hot meat plate...

Edited by tsquare (log)
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We only ate there once, after a long drive up from Southern Oregon. Apparently we'd hit the jackpot: pig cheek day. We sat in the cramped back room and drank the serve-yourself wine from juice glasses and fell into a conversation with an older gentleman with a law degree and one eye on the register who seemed please to talk liberal politics with folks from the other Washington, in between tending to the last trickle of the lunch rush. Altogether charming and delicious,

I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

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Was that last Friday?

BTW - we have noted the change of reference from "date" to "boyfriend". Have fun.

I had the cinnamon pork this week - too much bread, too little pork. Keep telling myself, order the hot meat plate...

Yes it was! Someone forgot to bring the camera...so no pictures :sad:

We had the meatball sandwich (very tasty...the meatballs were tender and juicy), the Marco Polo (chicken and prosciutto...good, but this was someone else's choice and I probably wouldn't get it again), a spicy pasta dish (ditto), and Gina bought out a few platters of sliced meats, some braised chicken and mushrooms, and some meat on minty fig jam/goat cheese and bread. The meatball was far and away my favourite last Friday.

They were out of the porchetta!!! :sad:

Cinnamon pork sounds interesting...

I was not aware there was a HOT meat plate. What's do you get when you order that?

(Yes, I have a bf now. He wooed me with food!!!! :laugh: )

Edited by Ling (log)
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So.....how much of a drive would it be from Portland? I'm drooling uncontrolably right now.

Kathy

Cooking is like love. It should be entered into with abandon or not at all. - Harriet Van Horne

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So.....how much of a drive would it be from Portland? I'm drooling uncontrolably right now.

Oregon or Maine? :laugh:

'bout three hours as I recall.

I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

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Right by the train station is a huge plus - I would much rather ride for three hours than sit behind the wheel of my car. Sounds like a trip I need to take very soon!

Kathy

Cooking is like love. It should be entered into with abandon or not at all. - Harriet Van Horne

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Right by the train station is a huge plus - I would much rather ride for three hours than sit behind the wheel of my car. Sounds like a trip I need to take very soon!

Remember, they are only open Tuesday through Friday. If I were you, I would call first, ask for Gina, and mention that you are training up from Oregon specifically for lunch at Salumi and see if she can set up a special lunch for you. It's really quite the experience. Get a large group together (I know where you can find interested people :wink: ) and you can even reserve the back room!

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Right by the train station is a huge plus - I would much rather ride for three hours than sit behind the wheel of my car. Sounds like a trip I need to take very soon!

These are the sammies we had. I think the pork cheeks are on the right. Fortunately the kids lacked the sense of adventure and the wife lacked the stomach capacity to finish off theirs, so I had Salumi buffet for two days on the leftovers. If you're training, I recommend picking up a bottle of the best wine that still tastes good in a plastic cup, and swilling and snacking the whole way home.

gallery_7296_1706_408588.jpg

BTW, if you are indeed "soon to be" in Portland, you should know that you will be within driving distance of one of the most kick-ass farmer's markets on earth.

I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

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