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Andy Lynes

When Recipes Attack!

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I bought 5 pounds of Concord grapes last weekend for Concord grape pies, two of them.

Are you using the recipe from a recent issue of Saveur? I wanted to try that.


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In general:

table salt = 10 oz. per cup

Morton's Coarse Kosher Salt = 7.7 oz. per cup

Diamond Crystal Kosher Salt = 5 oz. per cup

Use 1.5 times as much if you use Morton, or twice as much if you use DC.

G, could you put this in your sig line so we don't forget where to find this info? :smile:

Hell of an idea, Matthew!

Yes, I'm dense.


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In general:

table salt = 10 oz. per cup

Morton's Coarse Kosher Salt = 7.7 oz. per cup

Diamond Crystal Kosher Salt = 5 oz. per cup

Use 1.5 times as much if you use Morton, or twice as much if you use DC.

Um, I think you meant 1.25 times as much Morton compared to table salt. :smile:

In the salt thread, there's a link to an article that contains information from the Morton Salt Consumer Affairs department, where they give the following numbers:

table salt = 10.2 oz per cup

Morton Coarse Kosher = 8.1 oz

(The article also mentions that Diamond weighs 5 oz, but that info didn't come from Morton).

Cook's Ill also gave some measurements recently, but that info isn't readily at hand at the moment.

edit: add link to mention of salt thread


Edited by Human Bean (log)

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In general:

table salt = 10 oz. per cup

Morton's Coarse Kosher Salt = 7.7 oz. per cup

Diamond Crystal Kosher Salt = 5 oz. per cup

Use 1.5 times as much if you use Morton, or twice as much if you use DC.

Um, I think you meant 1.25 times as much Morton compared to table salt. :smile:

In the salt thread, there's a link to an article that contains information from the Morton Salt Consumer Affairs department, where they give the following numbers:

table salt = 10.2 oz per cup

Morton Coarse Kosher = 8.1 oz

(The article also mentions that Diamond weighs 5 oz, but that info didn't come from Morton).

Cook's Ill also gave some measurements recently, but that info isn't readily at hand at the moment.

Thank you.

I had heard add 50% more Morton somewhere else. I neglected to do the math.

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In general, recipes LIE.

My favourite sticking point is the onion softening/browning.

Nearly every cookery book has something like 'soften the onions without browning on a low heat - about 3-mins' - NO NO NO , who are they trying to kid?

And when they need browning, and they say it is going to take 5 minutes?

Some books are good, and tell the truth. I would like to know why they do it though. Do they think people will not cook any recipe that says it will take over 20 minutes?

I totally agree with you on this. Whenever I see that browning onions should take 10 minutes or less I always wonder how high a flame they're using. My onions never brown that quickly. 482.gif


"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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Time for a decade-of-hibernation bump! A cookie recipe on the back of the Andes chip bag:

image.jpg

 

Basically the instructions are to dump everything in the bowl and stir. Which yields a lumpy mess with room temperature butter. Maybe it would have baked out fine, but since basically every other cookie recipe on the planet at least mixes the butter and sugar together, if not creams it, I tossed attempt one and made the dough following a normal procedure instead.

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Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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On 15/12/2015 at 4:18 AM, Chris Hennes said:

Time for a decade-of-hibernation bump! A cookie recipe on the back of the Andes chip bag:

image.jpg

 

Basically the instructions are to dump everything in the bowl and stir. Which yields a lumpy mess with room temperature butter. Maybe it would have baked out fine, but since basically every other cookie recipe on the planet at least mixes the butter and sugar together, if not creams it, I tossed attempt one and made the dough following a normal procedure instead.

 

I'd be highly dubious of any recipe that calls for crème de menthe.  Especially if it's in the title.

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On ‎12‎/‎15‎/‎2015 at 10:18 PM, Chris Hennes said:

Time for a decade-of-hibernation bump! A cookie recipe on the back of the Andes chip bag:

image.jpg

 

Basically the instructions are to dump everything in the bowl and stir. Which yields a lumpy mess with room temperature butter. Maybe it would have baked out fine, but since basically every other cookie recipe on the planet at least mixes the butter and sugar together, if not creams it, I tossed attempt one and made the dough following a normal procedure instead.

Hmmm. You probably could have put the lumpy mess into a 9x13-inch pan, smoothed it out, baked it and then sliced bar cookies from it. (But I don't suppose you want to try it again.)

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6 hours ago, jmacnaughtan said:

I'd be highly dubious of any recipe that calls for crème de menthe.  Especially if it's in the title.

The Creme de Menthe component was the Andes bits: there is no liqueur in the recipe.


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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1 hour ago, Chris Hennes said:

The Creme de Menthe component was the Andes bits: there is no liqueur in the recipe.

 

Sorry, I had no idea that crème de menthe chocolate chips existed.  Seems like a weirdly retro flavour...

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17 hours ago, Chris Hennes said:

They are actually just fragments of Andes chocolate mints, if you're familiar with that product.

 

I  don't think those ever made it across the Atlantic, but I'm sure there's an equivalent.  I do however stand by my earlier reservations against Crème de Menthe.

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